Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
7 articles on this page
Advertising

'Every Picture Tells a Story* ="  Of Weak, Aching Backs and Inactive Kidneys; of Irritable, Dropsical Nervous People who Need I Doan's ii0aiLAL S with There areare Loins, antdhe Backache, Dragging Pains in the Loins, the Swellings of Dropsy, and the Stiffness and Aches of Rheumatism, and who do not Understand what Makes them ill. No one knows the Buffering some women quietly endure. They think it is only natural for them to have pain in the back, throbbing headaches, dizzy spells, rheumatic twinges, irregular heart, and to feel tired and worn out before the day is half through. And to they bear up as best they can, in patience and without complaint, never thinking they can be cured, never sus- pecting the kidneys as the cause of their illness. But it is not right for women to be always ailing. Doan's Pills gently heal the tired, overworked kidneys, and when the kid- neys are well they take out the liquid yoiffpna which cause the above symptoms, ms well as bladder disorders, gravel, dropsy, rheumatism and lumbago. a The work the kidneys have to do is totally different from the work of the other organs of the body. The heart pumps the blood. The lungs feed the systm witli-air. The digestive system deals with the food we I BUT THE KIDNEYS HAVE TO FILTER THE BLOOD, and drain out the liquid waste from our food and drink. That is what the kidneys are for-to keep the blood pure. When they fail, the poisonous waste left in the blood makes you feel heavy, sleepy and irritable; your back aches, you may get a touch of rheu- matism, dropsical swellings appear under the eyes or in the ankles. The urinary system is affected, and you may suffer from gravel or stone. Kidney and urinary disorders are a olaøø of diseases by themselves, and treat. ment that is successful for other diseases may be WRONG for the kidneys—only a kidney remedy can help them. That is what Doan's Backache Kidney Pills are for. They are intended for the kidneys and urinary system and nothing else. If this remedy is starred with in good time, before the kidneys are seriously diseased, the good results will be porms, nent. But do not neglect your kidneys too long. In flg boftI only, tix hoxu lSft. Zfever Uxm. Of alt chmisu and storts, or from FoiUr-ifeOtUanOf., t, Willt-itrttt, Word-strut. LONWO, r. MtfuM I I m t) NOTICE. 1 THE BEST SHOP FOR EVENING SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS AND I MATERIAL IS THE SCHOLASTIC BOOK DEPOT. I J.. X:10,3r X-' Z 11 I BOXES OF INSTRUMENTS from Is. to 42B. N TRANSPARENT SET-SQUARES. t DIARIES FOR 1917. DRAWING PAPER, RUBBER ERAZERS. t PROTRACTORS, FRENCH CURVES. t INDIAN INK, DRAWING PENS, t T SQUARES. SET SQUARES, SCIENCE NOTE- 1 BOOKS. I DRAWING BOARDS, TRACING CLOTH. TRACING PAPER. FOUNTAIN PENS from 2a. 6d. to 42s. SWAN, ONOTO. WATERMAN, from 10s. 6d. to 42s. I PARK HALL BUILDINGS, 95, QUEEN-STREET, CARDIFF. l I SVHARTON-BTKEET SALER- OOME, CARDIFF. MR. A. SETCH FIELD will SELL M AUCTION 130 THURSDAY NEXT a Large Assemblage of Superior HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND EFFECTS, removed for convenience of Sale, comprising Pianofortes, Walnnt Sideboards and Over- mantels. Dining and Occasional Tables, Wal. nut and Oak Hallstands, CHocks, Bronzes, Dining and Drawing-room Suites, excedeni T. and Dinner Services, Carpets and Rugs, Curbs and Brasses, 0 Bedroom 8uitee iJl various woods. All-Brass and other Bed. steads Wire and Wool Overlays, Chests of Drawers, Washstands. Tables, Toilet Ware. k. b. r gale at 2 o'clock sharp. Nb reserve. LARGE qaantitien of Yellow and Red WALL JU FLOWER PLANTS FOR SALE. WREATHS and CROSSES sent any Distance at Shortest Notio*. S. WOODHAM & SON, I Wbolesale & Ratiil FiBit^StoRS, 108, HIGH STREET. BARRY. n_' Telephone 374. The Oil Varnish Stain FOR FLOORS IN 12 NATURAL SHADES. t pt.. pt., 1 PL. I qt., gall, & 1 gall. TINS. ASK YOUR ISONMONGER OR DECORATOR FOU STOVO A STAtftOt ELM A SEE THAT YOU GET THCM MANUFACTURER OF BOTH: 1 JAMES RUDMAN, BRISTOL. ) "STOVO," The Famous BLACK ENAMEL For Bicycles, Grata, 8c all Ornamenlcl Ironwork. IN TINS OF CONVENIENT SIZES .# FOR EVERY DESCRIPTION OF HOUSE REPAIRS TOWN OR COUNTRY H. A. FOSTER, PARK CRESCENT, BARRY. POST ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO

BARRY POLICE COUUT

BARRY POLICE COUUT. FRIDAY. Before Mr. J. C. Meggitt and Mr. W. Jones Thomas. BLAMED THE BOARDING MASTER. William Strother .signed on the steamer Millicent Knight, chartered by the Admiralty at Barry on November 2nd, and was ordered aboard at 6 pgari. the same day. He failed to put in an appearance, and the ship sailed without him. P.C. Brighit arrested prisoner at the Shipping Office on the 6th instant. Strother blamed his boarding-master, Mr. Hill, wmo, he alleged, detained him by keeping his clothes. The boarding maslter denied this, and Strot.her was sentenced to a month's im- prisonment. I NO INTENTION TO DESERT. Thomas tinltin, a seaman, was charged with a simil.ar offence. ¡ He signed on the Loch Lomond trans- port in London, and came to Bairn7 in the ship and deserted. I He now pleaded that he had no in-1 tention of .leaving the ship. I One month's impTiaonment. 1 MET HIS PALS. A young seaman, David Jenkins, was also charged with failing to join the transDort East Wales on November 3rd. L Accused Staid he went to Pontypridd to get his clothes, and met some of his pals, with the result t.hat when he came back the ship had sailed. Fined 40/ j AN EMACIATED CHILD. Mr. Alfred Jackson, solicitor, was for the prosecution in a case against, Maud Lloyd, a housekeeper, at 10, Lee- road, Oadoxton-Barrv, charged by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, for cruelty in re- spect of a ihinteen-year-old girl, Emma Constance Day. Mr. Jackson stated that. the child. only weighed three stone with her clothes on. Defendant asked for an adjournment to get a solicitor. The Bench adjourned the case till Monday, accused being admitted to bail in a surety of L-50. THE DRINK LIST. Four seamen, William FOTsyth, I Ernest Solamsen, William Green, and Wain Homberg. each forfeited a de- pos.it of 10/- for being drunk at Barn'1 j Docks.. I I ABSENT FROM WELSH I REGIMENT. Thomas Wm. Cook and William; Peddle, two privates in the Welsh Re-; gimen/t, at 'Kimnel Park, Rhyl, were both charged with absenting themselves, j and were handed over to await an es- i cort. I I JDJliFA u Jul iJNljr ALilJiiiN o. I Salvador Barros and Ander Eann- quesisg forfeited deposits of X2 each for disobeying the Aliens' Order by coming ashore without leave. I I MONDAY. ) Before Major-General H. H. Lee and Mr. D. T. Alexander. ¡ SCHOOL CASES. I Edward Williams, who failed to ap- pear, was charged with breach of edu- cation bye-laws, and on the applica- tion of Mr. Spencer Jones, County Council attendance officer, the case was adjourned for a week. For similar offence, Bert Spear, Dinas Powis, was fined 5/ GIPSIES' HORSES STRAYED. John Jones, a gipsy, was charged with allowing three horses to stray in Main-street, Oadoxton, and on the evi- dence of PJC. Wm. Gamsworthy was fined 5/ Edith Lee, also a gipsy, was fined a like amount for the same offence. UNDER MISAPPREHENSION. William Grootonk, a Dane, was charged with breach of the Aliens' Restriction Order, by proceeding ashore without the permission of the registration officer. P.C. Brimson said defendant ar- rived from Rotterdam on tire 4th in- stant, on the steamship Skognold. De- fendant had a pass to be on shore from eight a.m. till six p.m., but he was found ashore at 7.30. Defendant pleaded that he was under a misapprehension, and was dismissed with a caution. THE DRUNKS. \V m. LeyfiBld made his first appear- ance on a charge of being drunk and incapable, and was fined 5/ j Ftr similar offences, deposits of 10/- by Olaf Androascn and Henry Hansen, seamen, were forfeited. POLICE OFFICER'S SMART CAPTURE. Patrick Duggan. an elderly man: j was charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 8/11. Police-Inspector R. H. Thomas said that on the 11th instant he saw the accused in Court-rQad, Barry Docks, carrying a pair of boots. He asked defendant, How much was your bar- gain," and he replied, I gave 4/9 for them in Davies' Witness noticed that one of the boots was marked 8/11, and took accused to Davies', where the manager said they had not sold the boots. Defendant then took witness to three other shops, but none of them had sold the boots. Taking the pri- soner to a fifth shop, the manager said they sold that class of boot, but had not sold this pair. Witness took de- fendant into custody, and in reply to the charge, accused said. I did not steal them. It was further 'pointed out that the two boots were of different sizes. Defendant said he had been in the trenches nine months, and since then he didn't know what lie was doing. I Inspecor Thomas produced prisoner's discharge, whichshotwed that he was medically unfit, and wa's 62 when dis- charged. Sent to prison for seven days with- out hard labour. SENSATIONAL CHARGE OF CRUELTY TO A CHILD. There was a large attendance of women in court to hear the adjourned case* against Maud Lloyd, who had been admitted to bail at the previous sitting, in the sum of ?100, who was charged with causing a child unneces- sary suffering. i Mr. Alfred Jackson, solicitor, was fbr the prosecution, and Mr. F. P. Jones-Lloyd, solicitor, defended. In opening the case, Mr. Jackson said the child Was Emma Constance Day, and lived at 7, Dovedale-street, Cadoxton, with her step-father, John j Tervanah. The child's father died a, few years ago, and her mother, who was now in the asylum, married, again. Accused came into Ter- vanah's service as housekeeper. Mr. I Jackson pointed out that a startling [ feature of the case was that the child, 13 years of age, with all her clothes on, with boots and hat, weighed only 3t stone, whereas the normal weight of such a child was six to seven stone. When the child was taken away she was found to be a mass of bruises, and one-bruise pointed clearly to hav- ing been caused by a stick. Her ears were knocked out of shape," and ap- peared to have been beaten continu- ally. When prisoner was arrested she admitted beating the child, but not to the extent stated. The stepfather, she said, had kicked the child. Inspector Alfred Kempster, of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelfty to Children, said that he visited 7, Dovedale-street, Cadoxton, on the loth of May, in consequence of complaints. Both eyes of the child he found were discoloured. On the child's head were several sores. He pointed out the girl's condition to the housekeeper, who said that the child had knocked her head against the fowl-house, causing two black eyes. Ac- cused then said that the black eyes came from the sores on her head. In his opinion, if the child had hit her head against the latch, (there would have been a cut. He visited 10, Lee- road, in company with Police Inspec- tor R. H. Thomas and Sergt. D. Phil- lips, on the 10th instant, and the child was undressed in. his presence. The ears were very swollen and tender to the touch. There was cataract on the! left eye. There were several abra- sions on the back of the neck, and a small wound on the left arm. From the back of the shoulder to the leg was simply one mass of bruises, all running into one another. There was one bruise, three and a half inches by two and a half inches, across the back of the thigh, showing distinct stripes. He had the child weighed, and she was 3 stone 7 lb., with all her clothes on. She was 13 years old next month, and the noi,mial weight was six to seven stone. The child ate ravenously when he gave her food. In.. his opinion she did not have sufficient food. The stepfather had told witness that he had had to stop accused from ill-breasting the child. Dr. J. R. Draper, Oadoxton, said he examined the child on Wednesday last. The right eye was black, and the left ear had been marked apparently for some timte. The ear had been cut to the extent of an inch and a half, and was permanently out of shape. The ex- planation given him was that the child had cut it. He did not think at the time that it had been caused by a scratch. The child's back was a mass of bruises, one bruise being three and a half inches long by two and a half inches wide. The mark could have been caused by a blunt instrument, but it must, have been a violent one. There were two weals behind each knee, about two inches long and half an inch wide. The legs and thighs were covered with bruises. There was a -small sore on the left arm, which the child said was a bite. The child was very thin, and did not seem to have been well nourished. The child must have been badly illtreated. Emma Constance Day, the child in question, who was placed on a form in court, gave her story of the cruelty meted out to her. The two black eyes, she said, were caused by the accused beating her on the face. She told the inspector that she had knocked herself against the latch of the door. She said this because she was afraid of the ac-1 cused, who had told her what to say. For the last three weeks she had been beaten all the time by the defendant with a cane and copperstick. One day last week defendant threw a saucepan of hot water over her. She had break- fast and tea, but no dinner, because defendant said she was a naughty girl. She was getting clouts every day, and a good hiding two or three times a week. She ran away last Tuesday to a house in Commercial-road, because of defendant's cruelty, and was told that she would get it worse when her father was on day-work. I At this stage accused fainted, and had to be carried out. Witness, continuing, told her aunt,: Mrs. Duffy, that she was going to com- mit suicide. She had heard her step- father tell defendant to hit her whero the marks would not be seen, but that was a long time ago. Maria Amos, 9, Dovedale-stroot; Cadoxton, said she had heard defen- dant threaten the child. She had seen defendant beat the child three weeks ago with a coppenstick across her back. A week last Tuesday defendant beat the child till her face was bleeding. She also beat her last week. Police-sergeant D. Phillips arrested the accused at 37, George-street, Barry Docks, and in-reply to the charge she said, I have beaten her, but not to that' extent. Her father will make his tale good, but he has kicked her." Mr. Jones Lloyd said the wrong per- son was in the dock. The father of the child ought to have been there. The child had said that on many occasions, when she was (beaten, her father was there. He had told the housekeeper to beat the child in a place where rt would not be seen, and wais present on many occasions when the child was j severely beaten. The child had run way before defendant had ever gone to the house. The girl had given her evidence well, but had apparently tried to screen her step-father. Defendant said she had been in Ter- vanagh's employ for a year and ten months, and he had given her author- ity to beat the children. Trevanagh was not willing for her to take the child to the doctor, as he said it was too much expense. She had always beaten the child with her hand, but had once or twice beaten her with the cane, but not with a stick. Mr. Jackson: The girl says that you told her to tell people that she struck her eyes against the latch of the door, « ,i i J1- 1_1.- _1- andtJha caused me DllaGK eyes. Accused: She did do it, and the doctor said that eczema caused her eyes to be bad. Mr. Jackson: Surely you don't ask the Bench to believe that. Defendant: Her eyes were not blacked; they were inflamed and swol- len. Her step-father kicked her on many occasions in my presence. General Lee: Defendant has be- j haved most cruelly to the child, who appears to be perfectly amenable to kindness, and the least we can do is to send defendant to goal for one month. We think the step-father is just as much tOO blame. It is a case of abso- lute neglect. Prisoner left the dock crying. I JOSTLING FOOT PASSENGERS. I David Callinane, Dennis Healey, I William Collard,. and William Page were cautioned for jostling foot pas- i sengers at Cadoxton. I 

Advertising

LLOYDS BANK I 1 LIMITED. I HEAD OFFICE: 71, LOMBARD ST., E.C. CAPITAL, SUBSCRIBED 931,304p200 I CAPITAL PAID UP 5,008,672 RESERVE FUND 3,600,000 DEPOSITS, &c. 133,958,678 ADVANCES, &c. 56,535,897 | FRENCH AUXILIARY: LLOYDS BANK (FRANCE) LIMITED. FOR mmm§ tMf «vriip ?  .?  L ?—?*?*?*?  ?" %?irrt%?*

HOLTONROAD ENGLISBT BAPTIST ANNIVERSARY I

HOLTON-ROAD ENGLISBT BAPTIST ANNIVERSARY.. I PASTORAL CALL BY THE CHURCH. Sunday last was Anniversary Day at Holton-road English Baptist Church, Barry Docks; the congregations were large throughout the day, and the ser- vices beautifu1, devotional, and impres- sive. The Rev. James Baillie, of Bath. was the special preacher, and the ser- mons preached by the well-known pas- tor were eloquent and effective. Miss Grace Spic-kett was the soloist in the morning, and Miss Florrie Scott and Mr. Phil Williaims in the evening, and an appreciative programme of sacred solos, duetts, and quartettes was con- tributed by Madame Pugh Harries, Miss Mattie George, Mr. Powell Evans, and Mr. Phil Evans. TRE PASTORATE. we understand that the members of Holton-road Baptist Church have ex- tended a unanimous call to the pastor- ate (which has been vacant since the Rev. T. Pandy John de- parted for the United States of America last year), to the Rev. Samuel Jones, of Treherbert. Mr. Jones is one of the strong men in the pulpit of the denomination in South Wales, and has previously held pastoral charges at Risoa and Rogerstone. The reply of the rev. gentleman, as to whether he will accept the ministerial oversight of the church is expected in a week or two.

OUTGREW HER STRENGTH

OUTGREW HER STRENGTH. A fine tall daughter, the pride of her parents, may have grown too fast. If, with her height, she is calm, even- tempered, rosy, with bright eyes and a springing footstep; you have nothing to fear for your girl. But this rapid growth is sometimes gained at the ex- 1 pense of her strength. Wayward tem- per, a consfant hunger for sweets, head- aches, and a pain in the back and side after a little healthy exertion mean that instead of entering womanhood smoothly and without disturbance, as she should, she is paying already the penalty of thin blood. Watch for moods. Look, after she has climbed a hill or run,upstairs, for hreathlessness, a colour that comes and goes, and a heart that beats fast and painfully, These mean ansemia, and an anaemic girl will never make a healthy, bloom- ing woman. She is bloodless. Let her have Dr. Williams' pink pills for pale people—and see that they have the name on the package. Soon a better appetite, bright eyes, calm temper and fresher colour in cheeks will tell you that she is making new blood; and then all will be well. I FREE.—For the help of parents in caring for growing girls and for all women not quite strong, useful hints I will be found in "Plain Talks"; send j I a post card for it to Hints Dept., 46, I Holbom Viaduct, Lonctan.

WHAT I SAW IN RUSSIA AND IN ITHE BALKANS N

"WHAT I SAW IN RUSSIA AND IN THE BALKANS." N DELIVERED BY MR. FOSTER FRAHER AT BARRY. Mr. John Foster Fraser, F.R.G.S.. the famous journalist and traveller, visited Barry on Sunday afternoon last, and delivered two eloquent and interest- ing lectures at the Theatre Royal, on "What I saw in Russia," and "My Wanderings in the Balkans." The lectures were narrated with that gra- phic power and explicitness so charac- teristic of the speaker, !and at times he held the large audiences spell-bound with his wonderful narrations. The stories were illustrated with lantern slides, which rendered word-pictures all the more thrilling and graphic. The chairman in the afternoon was Oapt. W. B. Whall, and in the evening Mr. W. Jones Thomas, J.P. Two-thirds of the proceeds were de- voted to the local Military Hospitals.

Advertising

WEDDING CARDS, To suit all tastes, from 2/6 a dozen, executed promptly and neatly at the Barry Dock News" Printing and Publishing Works.