Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
39 articles on this page
Advertising

T WHAT'S THIS I 9 .m 11 SEli THIS SPACE TO-MORROW.

Advertising

<. ::J ¡. rhe Cambria Daily I Leader" gives later aews than any paper published in this dis- trict.

I BRITISH FRONT EXTENDED

I BRITISH FRONT EXTENDED. OPERATION ON NORTHERN BANK OF THE ANCRE. SOME CROUND RELINQUISHED TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. The following dispatch was issued from British Headquarters in France at 10.40 a.m. \s a result of yesterday's operations we have extended our front east from Beaucourt along the north- ern bank of the Ancre. During the night there was heavy hostile shelling against Beaucourt and Beaumont Hamel. Yesterday afternoon a strong enemy counter-attack forced us to relin- quish a part of the ground east of the Butte-de-Marlencourt won on Nov. 14th. We carried out two successful raids on the enemy trenches north-east of Wulverghem, taking prisoners and inflicting considerable losses. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. The night was relatively calm on the whole front. Our guns forced two aeroplanes to com edown in our lines, one the day before yesterday south of At- teiciiy, and the other yesterday near Roye en Matz. The aviators were taken prisoners. Yesterday our aircraft in the region of Amiens fought 54 fights, in the course of which Lieut. Heauteaux brough tdown his 13th machine, and Second-Lieutenant Guiyne- mer his 21st. During the night several bombard- ments were carried out, notably ilgainst the railway stations and works of Esch Sur Alzette, Lux- emburg, and the aviation park of Tergnier. Oxer 1,500 kilogrammes of bombs were dropped.

HOMEWARD BOUND

HOMEWARD BOUND. German Underseas Liner Leaves New London. New London, Friday.—The tidal con- iition6 were perfect as the DeutscMand rapidly sped down the harbour this morning. A tug was ahead of her, an- other following behind. A newspaper tug accompanied her throughout the night. The United States cruiser Col- umbia, anchored off the Eastern Point, playe da searchlight over the lower har- bour with the idea, it is believed, of maintaining neutrality., New London, later.—The newspaper launch returned after following the Deu tech land 10 miles out to sea. The voyage thus far has been without inci- dent. The value of the Deutschland's cargo is estimated at two million dollars. It consists largely of. crude rubbed, nickel, zinc, silver bars, and several tacks con- taining the Embassy mail.

BEARING MONASTIR

BEARING MONASTIR. Allied Troops Only Four Miles Away. The French, Serbian, Russian, and Italian troops advancing on Monaetir have won a series of important sncceseas, and have driven the Bulbars to within four miles of the town. A great feat of arms by the Serbians operating in the mountains east of Monaetir was the vital factor. Bad weather ad'doo to the natural difficulties of the country, but the Serbians forced their way to Cegel, three miles south-east of Jaratok, an important stategic point commanding the only mountain tracks in the district. With this position in the ^Serbians' hands., they commanded the Bulgar positions on the other side of the river. The Bulgars were compelled to retire from the Kenali position, which was es- pecially chosen by General von Macken- sen, and had been elaborately prepared for defence. They have retired to a weaker line three and thtee-quarter miles from Monaatir. with the Alhes in pursuit. i On the Struma front the British—as re- ported overnight—turned the Dulgare out of the village of Karakapka, on Lake Tahinos, by a brilliant attack.

NO FOOD TICKETSYETI

NO FOOD TICKETS-YET. The Times has excellent authority for stating that the question of granting food tickets is not regarded as at all likely to j arise immediately. Conditions, of course, Ii may change at any time, but the outlook is not now such as to render tie adoption of I the German system in any degree probable

MEATLESS MENU

MEATLESS MENU. On the suggestion of Colonel oLckwood, I M.P., the Kitchen Committee of the House of Commons will in future provide a vegetarian menu daily for the conveni- ence of M.P!s who desire voluntarily to adopt meatless days. The London and North-Western Railway Company have adopted the suggestion of If-r. Runciman, and instituted a daily rogetarian menu throughout the whole of their system, as well as measures which they .hope will secure a diminution in the consumption of potatoes- j

I SMUTS TRIBUTE1

I. SMUTS' TRIBUTE 1 I THE OPERATIONS Of SOUTH AFRICAN I FOBGtS AN ABIDING DEBl OF CRATiTUDE From the Prose Association's Special Correspondent with General Smuts' forces in German East Africa:— Moroforo, Wednesday (received Friday). —The following Order has been issued: The Commander-in-Chief desires to take the opportunity afforded by the return of the first considerable number of Union troops to South Africa, and of units in various other quarters, to place upon record his sincere appreciation of the valuable and arduous work performed by all ranks of all the forces under his com- mand during the past nine months. In this war, of which heroism, self-sacrifice, and self-denial are constant features, the j share of the forces in ULt Africa Buffers in lie. way by comparison with that of the Britisn. forces elsewhere. For months the troops of the South African Expeditionary Force have been almost daily in contact with a brave enemy, led with skill and courage, in most difficult and dangerous country, where enervating tropical I, diseases are rife. Few have been fortu- nate enough to avoid their weakening and depressing effects. I HEAVY EXTRA LABOUR. The absence of roads, and the rough nature of the terrain, have constantly im- posed on the troops heavy additional labour, which the Commander-in-Chief would have gladly spared them had it been possible. Deadly animal diseases, which are prevalent throughout the looilntry, added to the scarcity of roads and occasional torrential rains, have ham- pered and restricted the transport work to an extent which caused suffering and privation of which no one who has not been in close association with the troops on the spot can have any adequate con- ception. In order to continue the pressure on the enemy it has been necessary to make demands on the troops which it has sometimes seemed impossible to expect them to fulfil. In thoee adverse circum- stances the response from all ranks has been magnificent. The result of their efforts has far exceeded expectation. AN ABIDING DEBT OF GRATITUDE. The troops which now return to the Union and elsewhere, as well as their comrades who remain to finish the work, may rest assured that their splendid share in the general task, which fitili proceeds towards completion, is fully recognised by the Commander-in-Chief, who wished those returning a safe voyage and speedy recovery from the efFecti of their recent trying experiences. Their countrymen owe them and their comrades who re- main an abiding debt of gratitude.

I KO FOR NOBLE I I

I K.O." FOR NOBLE. I Bermondsey Boxer Beaten by Taney Lee. Boxing at the Liverpool stadium on Thursday night, Tom Noble, the clever Berinondsey boxer, was knocked out in the twelfth round by Taney Lee. Vigorous exchanges, chiefly in clinches, characterised the first two rounds, and Noble was cautioned for holding in the third. There was more infighting in the fourth, in which Lee was very aggressive, but Noble staggered him with a right to the jaw. Lee was cautioned for holding in the fifth round. I Both fought themselves nearly to a standstill in the sixth round, but Lee's constant visitations to the ribs told their tale i.n the next, though Noble's ducking saved him from several hard swings, and in turn he reached the head with the right. Noble was dropped with a swing to the jaw in the eighth round, and stood a gruelling till the gong sounded. For practically the whole of the ninth meet- ing Noble sat on the ropes, and Lee could not penetrate his defence with a decisive j punch. Noble adopted the same tactics in the next round, and though Lee attacked steadily. Noble's blocking wa? good. The Londoner's resting tactics were con- tinued in the eleventh, and the end came ,b an d the en(I in the twelfth round, a right swing to the jaw sending Noble down, to be counted out.

I FINLAND RAID I

I FINLAND RAID. I I Between Six and Nine Ger- man Torpedo Boats Lost. (Press Association War Service;. Petrograd, Thursday.—With referenrei to the important defeat sustained by Ger- I man torpedo boats when they made their recent raid at the entrance to the Gulf of Finland, under cover of fog, t'he naval General Staff issues the following com- munique :— Comparing the number of explosions heard in the fog with the reports of Rus- sian ships it is possible to affirm that! the Germans lost from six to nine torpedo boats. This supposition is confirmed also by an analysis of the debris and floating articles recovered up to the present. The German torpedo boats which we destroyed belonged to the moat modern and largest types of ships of this class.

I THE BIRTH OF A NATION I

"THE BIRTH OF A NATION." It should be stated there will be only four matinees of the above beautiful pic- torial masterpiece next week at the Grand I Theatre, Swansea, viz., Monday, Wednes- day. Thursday, and Saturday afternoons. I

I AUTHOR OF QUO VADIS I

AUTHOR OF "QUO VADIS." I Verey. Thurwlay.Hi-nry K. Sienkie- wiez, the famous Polish writer, has died here of heart failure. Sdenkiewicz, who was seventy years of age, was the foremost Polish novelist of his day, and his Quo Vadis has been translated into many ianguages.- Press Association.

ONLY JOKING

ONLY JOKING! I here is to be no boxing match between Mr. Stanton, M.P., and Mr. Winstone, the president of the Welsh Miners' Federa- tion, so the £200 purse offered by Mr. Charles Burnett, of Cardiff, will not be battled for under National Sporting Club rules. The ready acceptance of Mr. Wins tone's challenge by Mr., Stanton. who said he would box for a £600 purse and 2200 a side over ten rounds, has drawn the ad- mission from Mr. Wiiis-tone that he was not serious in the challenge. Mjoreover, Mr. Winston;; now Fays he wal to hear nothing more about the 1 suggested fight,

SEIZED PAMPHLETS

SEIZED PAMPHLETS. SEQUEL TO RAID BY SWANSEA VALLEY PDUCE. "HO GO!fSGR!PTI0SI FELLOWSHIP" At Pontardawe Police Court on Fri- day, Thomas Evans, collier, of Ynis- meudwy, wa.s charged under Section 27 of the Defence of the Realm Act for being in possession of pamphlets and docu- ments which were likely to prejudice ue- cruiting and. the discipline of His Majesty's Forces. Considerable interest was taken in the case, the court being packed with people.—Mr. Henry Thomp- son appeared to prosecute, on behalf of Capt. Lindsay, Chief Constable of Glam- organ. Air. Thompson, in a lengthy opening, explained that the defendant was secre- tary of the local branch of the No- Conscription Fellowship." On August 30th defendant's house was visited hv Inspectqj-David, Pontardawe, who found a large number of pamphlets, briefiete,. tracts and documents which were. subse- quently submitted to the War Office, and, after being examined in Tendon the papers were returned to the Chief Con- stable of Glamorgan with instructions to prosecute the defendant. IN THE NATION'S INTERESTS. Mr. Thompson went on to say that he considered it absolutely expedient in the interest of the nation that everything should be done to encourage the brave men who are upholding the standard of their country in France and other places. In his opinion it was nothing short of treachery for anyone, whatever his private convictions may be, to do or say anything which may discourage all those men who, were laving- down their lives daily. Mr. Thompson also added that anyone in I)os. session of such treasonable and seditious pamphlets should not be tolerated in the community in which they lived. Before commencing the evidence, the defendant, asked for an adjournment in order to call legal advice- Mr. Thompson strongly opposed this ap- plication. Mr. Thorpe (the clerk) pointed ont to the defendant that he had been served with a summons since the 9th of Novem- ber, and had plenty of time to secure legal advice. Defendant, in reply, said he expected to see a solicitor there to-day from Mer- thyr, but he had not turned up. Supt. Letheren produced his authority to prosecute the defendant, and he said it was at his instigation that the raid on defendant's house was undertaken. THE RAID DESCRIBED. Inspector David gave evidence of the raid on August 30th, in company with P.S. Thomas. Defendant was then in work, and witness and the sergeant took possession of pamphlets numbering several thousands in all. When seen later the defendant said: Yes, they are my property. L would like to have a list of them." To this the inspector said that he had never seen defendant distribute any pamphlets about the streets, but he' had seen defendant carrying parcels from the station. Witness had also seen de- fendant taking part in several meetings, held under the, auspices of the local Socialist Party. Defendant: Have you had any com- plaint against my moral or political con- duct in this district? Inspector David: No. Captain Harold Williams, military re- presentative for Sfraiusea district, said he had perused a number of the pamphlets (produced), which had been seized, and he had no hesitation in saying that they were prejudicial to recruiting. The Bench took a serious view of the CAGe, and imposed a fine of C30 or three months. < Defendant elected to take the three months.

MR FRED GRIFFITHS I

MR. FRED GRIFFITHS. I Serious Illness of Swansea Musician His many friends will regret to hear I that Mr. Fred Griffiths, a well-known Swansea musician, is at present lying very ill in hospital in London. One of the greatest flautists Wales has ever produced, he was about to tour the halls in the early days of the war, but sacri- ficed a number of large contracts with a view to devoting his labours to war work. In March of this year he contracted bronchial catarrh, and. has been in in- different health since.

WELSH PARTY MEETINGI

WELSH PARTY MEETING. The meeting of the Welsh ParHamen- I tary Party will be held on Tuesday next, instead of Wednesday as at first arranged, tn consider the proposal that steps be taken to obt?in a Welsh National Coun- cil of Education after the war.

PRICE OF MILKI

PRICE OF MILK. I Gloucester and Somerset farmers met I on Thursday at Bristol, and resolved to I raise the price of milk from December 1st 4d. a gallon. A resolution was paseed i that if the Government fix the price of milk they should also be asked to fix the phice of feeding stuffs.

CLOSED HOUSESI

CLOSED HOUSES. I The Central Control Board-liquor traffic —have in the past week issued orders clos- ing six licensed premises for the sale and supply of intoxicating liq ilor <)ne in FA i n- I burgh, one in Glasgow, two in Larkhall, I.ÆI.nark6hire, one in Irvine, and one in Gi-eeliock.-for the remainder of the licen- sing year. This brings the number of houses which the Board have found it necessary to deal with in this mann-er in order effectively to control the sale and supply of intoxicating liquor in different areas in Great Britain to 50--2-9 in England and Wales, and 28 in Scotland.

100000 GIFT

£100,000 GIFT. The Quoonreceived the committee of the British Women's Hospital at Buckingham Palace on Thursday, when Lady Cowdray presented to her Majesty a cheque for £ 100.000 for the building and equipment of the Star and Garter Home, one for £ 40,000 for the endowment of a ward, and another of £ 10,000 for the compassionate fund. The donations ranged form Id. to xi,ooo. In expressing her thanks her Majesty said she much appreciated the untiring, efforts rendered to bripg about such a suc- cessful result, and continued: "This hand- some gift will always be a prominent memorial of the gratitude of the women of the British Empire to these who have suffered in the service of their King and ooun try,"

I TONGUES OUT OUTI

I TONGUES OUT OUT. I I FIESDISH TREATMENT Of RUMANIAN | SOLDIERS. I I I THE THIRST FOR REVENGE I Bucharest, Wednesday (delayed).-At the invitation of the Rumanian General Staff some foreign newspaper and news agency correspondents have visited the western front. On their journey to the scene of the fierce battles which are be- ing victoriously sustained' by tbhe Ru- manian troops, who are desperately de- fending the passes, they passed through the rich and well-cultivated province of Oltenie. One of the journalists gives his impressions as follows:— We lived in exciting days, hearing from a short distance the growling of the guns and the characteristic noise of the iiiachiiac-giins. Old men, women, and even children were helping in the defence of their country by carrying, in wagons drawn by horses and oxen, munitions and supplies, and by actively working in the fields. We were able to realise the enor- mous pressure exercised by the enemy toO force the passes between the mountains, in which fierce. fighting lasts day and night. Despite the continual bombard- ment by heavy artillery, the Rumanian soldiers are offering an energetic resist- ance, well supported by their officers, who give them an example of contempt for death. THE THIRST FOR REVENGE. The Jiul front has became the prin- cipal centre of the enemy's attacks, be- cause he hopes to reach the plain, to descend on the Danube, and to capture the regions of Oltenie, and facilitate com- munications oh the Danube. The enemy | also hopes to take cruel revenge for the! defeats inflicted upon him by the Ruma- nian troops. We also visited hospitals, where we talked with a number of German -,v h -ere we t, and Austro-Hungariau prisoners who had come to Rumania from various fronts; such as Verdun, Kovel and Riga. The I prisoners replied without hesitation to • our questions, and all gave the impression of soldiers delighted to have finally got: out of a veritable hell. TONGUES CUT OUT. l I In hospital in Craiva we saw two I Rumanian soldiers who had had their tongues cut out by the Hungarians for refusing to give replies to questions which' had been asked them. We also saw two gallant Russian soldiers who, after hav-1 ing been in captivity for 18 months, sue- ceeded in escaping after several attempts, 1 and reached Rumanian territory after in-; curring a thousand dangers. They are treated as brothers by the Rumanians. We gained the impression that the Ruma- nians will resist the German and Austro- Hungarian attacks with the aid of the Association War Special.

TRADE PARALYSIS j

) TRADE PARALYSIS. j Australian Government and I the Coal Strike. Sydney, Nov. 15.—As a result of the coal strike, the Government, acting under the powers conferred by the Emergency Bill, which has been submitted to the Legislative Assembly, is assuming control of the elec- tric and gas supplies in Sydney, with a view to conserving the resources for neces- sary industries, bakeries, slaughter-houses, etc. It is estimated that 1,500 factories, theatres, and newspaper offices, employing altogether 20,000 hands, will close to- morrow in consequence. Under Government control the supplies will last for a fortnight, otherwise the elec- tric supplies would have ceased on Monday and the gas supplies on Thursday.— Reuter, Melborune, Thursday.—At to-day's con- ference on the coal strike Mr. Hughes pro- posed that the coalminers should resume work on Monday, and that a tribunal to adjudicate the dispute should be ap- pointed, which should commence its labours on Monday. The conference ad- journed to consider the proposals.— Reuter.

ABERAVON BOXING BOUTS I

ABERAVON BOXING BOUTS. I Another of the series of boxing tourna- ments arranged by Mr. Alf Harry, of Swansea, will take place at the Palace Theatre, Aberavon, on Saturday. The principal contests will be one in the welter-weight division between Will Brooks (Aberavon) and Harry Davies (Caerau). There will be six round bouts [ between Reese Jones (Sandfiekk) and > Young Ricketts (Maesteg); and Bogey Davies (Britonferry) and Young Stephenel, (Melyn). Tal Jones (Pontypridd) and Young Lodge (Neath) meet over a ten round course.

CALLED HIM A GERMANI

CALLED HIM A GERMAN. I The case in which Mr. W. B. Collynt, of Clapham Park, claimed damages for libel from Mr G W. Hill, of High crate, came to an end on Thursday by counsel apologising on behalf of Mr. Hill and stating that be had agreed to indemnify Mr. Collyns a? regards ocsts. Both men were members of the City of T/ondon National Guard, ond the ca was that Mr. Hill had stated to his section leader officer and to the Anti-German Union that Mr. Collyns was o. German. The T/ord Chief Justice ruled that the communication to the section leader was privileged, but the one to Lady Makgill and the Anti-German Union was not.

A WORTHLESS FELLOWI

A WORTHLESS FELLOW. I "He is one of those worthless felIow I vvho tramp the country and dodge work." said Supt. Ben Evans at Neath County! Sessions on Friday, of William Evans, an itinerant.. who was charged with begging at Britonferry. Accused, a young man of rohust appmr-Ii ance, said b? was a dbMmrged eotdier, and had been to the Dnroanellœ. Supt. Ben Evans: Nothing of the kind. We know your record. You are an impn- dmt man, and insolent. He was sent down for 14 days.

EMINENT PREACHERS VISIT TOI SWANSEA

EMINENT PREACHER'S VISIT TO SWANSEA. Principal Henderson, of Bristol, one of the most renowned pulpit orators in the country, will preach at Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, Swansea, on Sunday morning and evening next. Large con- gregations are expected- It is interesting, whilst speaking of Mount Pleasant Church, to note that the pastor (the R,ov. H. ç. Mandor), who is doing magnificent work amongst the troops at the front, is quite well-

CREAT GALE

CREAT GALE. — ■■ ■- FRENCH VESSEL ASHORE AT MUMBLES CRW RESGUED BY SOLDIERS AND LiiiHlnuUSE RttPtKS The strong south-easterly gaile which prevailed throughout Thursday night con- tinued on .Friday, and locally has wrought considerable damage to property. The Swansea Bay is sheltering several srnail craft, and no little difficulty will be experienced, if the high winds con- tinue, to bring them into port. Just before 10 o'clock on Friday morn- ing, the three-masted French schooner St. Christoplie, bound from Bordeaux to Swansea with pitwood, dragged her anchor, and was swept on to the rocks near the Mumbles Lighthouse. The crew (10) were, after much difficulty, landed and are now comfortably housed in the battery at the lighthouse. The rescue of the men was effected by various appliances by the soldiers stationed at the fort and the lighthouse-keepers. The craft is in a perilous position, and the is very little hope of her being brought off the rocks. Heavy seas are breaking over her, and she might become a total wrec-d, at any moment. The local broker of the St. Christophe is Mr. W. G. M. Jeffreys, Glo'ster-piaoe, Swansea. DECKS WASHED AWAY. Later news states that the stern of the vessel—owing to the receding tide—is now high and dry, and the crew have been able to get on board to fetch their belong- ings. The decks have been washed away. It may be mentioned that the work of rescue was conducted by the lighthouse keepers, Messrs. John Thomas and Chas. Cottle. They, together with the soldiers, experi- enced much difficulty in getting the crew ashore, they having to link arms before the rescue could be effected. There is a good deal of wreckage lying about, and the ship is expected to break up at any moment. NEATH FOOTBALL STAND DEMOLISHED. At 6 o'clock on Friday morning the grand stand of the Neath Rugby Football Club was completely wrecked by the force of the easterly gale. The structure was lifted from its foundations and fell with a crash into Gnoll Park-road, slightly damaging the railings of the residences. Traffic was impeded for several hours by the wreckage. Happily ne one was in- jured. The damage is estimated at over £100. SAND OBSTRUCTS RAILWAY. The London and North Western Rail- way Co, have to run a single line near Blackpill owing to the large amount of sand being blown on to the lines.

TRADE WITH RUSSIA

TRADE WITH RUSSIA. Lord Rhondda and After-War Outlook. A few days ago Edouard S. Luboff, the Russian journalist now in this country, secured an interview with Lord Rhontlcia. He explained that he was a journalist fighting for Russian emancipation from the German commercial. Lord Rhondda said he was interested in Russia, and had done business with her long before the war. He considered Russia was a country with enormous possibili-i ties, and he felt certain that here in Great Britain they were going to do all they could to establish firm business relations with her. He had made a close study of the subject of trade with Russia, and was acquainted with all the facts. There was scope for large undertakings in Russia, said the coal magnate, and the British had transformed wild countries in the past by sheer hard work. Russia offered much easier work, and offered a market with a population of 170,000,000. He realised, he said, that Russia was the great uropean market of the. future. He did not fear competition; it would benefit Rassia. Concluding the interview, Ed. Luboff goes on to say that as the opinions of Lord Rhondda were valued opinions and highly appreciated in this country, he was con- vinced that the future of Anglo-Russian trade would be rightly handJed by men of mark in this oountry. )

MEDICAL BOARDS

MEDICAL BOARDS^ At Camberley tribunal on Thursday a letter from the War Office was read stating that in view of the ignorance prevailing throughout the country as to the nature of the examination by Medical Boards, ar- rangements are to be made whereby the military representatives and the members of the,local tribunals are, in future, to visit personally the Medical Boards to see for themselves how the medical examina- tions are conducted.

COLLISION WITH CHIMNEY

COLLISION WITH CHIMNEY. At Montrose, on Thursday afternoon, an aeroplane, piloted by Lieut. Fowler. Royal Flying Corps, collided with a chim- ney of a dwelling-house, and remained fast on the roof. The impact caused the petrol tank to catch fire, and before as- sistance could be rendered the pilot was found to be dead. Whether death was due to burning or to the collision is not known.

BACK FROM THE SOMME

BACK FROM THE SOMME. The Rev. David Rhys lewis, of West Vale, Halifax—a native of Rhyd-y-pandv, and well-known in local Welsh and English Baptist churches—has just re- turned after three months' service with the Y.M.C.A. on the Somme front. Mr. Lewis, who was the life and soul of the Y.M.CA. movement at the line, had charge for nearly three monhs of one of the largest huts in France. It is situ- ated in a village not far from the scene of reoent operations, and in the first days of the Push, life was exciting in the hut. A "Johnson" fell in the yard be- hind the hut—which had been improvised out of a huge barn—but the men "carried on." In Mr. lewis" period this par- ticular centre, had quieted down, but he has had some lively experiences between the village and the new fighting line. Mr. Lewis met the Rev. If. C. Mandor frequently. Mr. Mander is now stationed at an advanced hospital near the line and he is held in great regard by the men. Another Swansea man i* also engaged here, Dr..Gabe, of Morriston. Serving the Y.M.C.A. as orderly in a dug-out at one of its most advanced positions on the Ancre front is a soldier named TTalt, whose mother livea 111 Fleet- street, Swansea,

ITODAYS WAR RE8PE

ITO-DAY'S WAR RE8PE I Leader" Office, 4.50 p.m. The operations of the British Forces on the northern bank of the Ancre have resulted in an extension of our front east of Beaucourt. During the after- noon a strong enemy counter-attack forced us to relinquish a part of the ground east of Butte de Warlencourt won on Nov. 14th. North-east of Wul- verghem enemy trenches were cuccee&- fully raided. General Smuts has paid a fine tribute to the energies of the British troops in our African operations. We owe ftiem, he says, an abiding debt of gratitude. French dispatches speak of violent fight- ing in the Ablaincourt region. The French, Serbian, and Italian troops advancing on Monastir were, according to yesterday's reports, only four miles from their objective.

TODAYS HEWS IN BRIEF

TO-DAY'S HEWS IN BRIEF Mr. Forster announced on Tin"?"day evening that in the last twelve months there were ninety-eight fatal accidents to members of the Royal Flying Corps (Mili- tary Wing). The Venetian Palace of Rome, formerly the seat of the Austrian Embassy to the Vatican, has been confiscated. The palace used as the Austrian Embassy to the Court has been sold to an Italian bank. AR British subjects in the Channel Islands of Guernsey, Sark, Herm. and Jethou between 18 and 41, with certain ex- emptions, become enrolled in the Army, I under the Military Service Act, in thirty days' time. Lieutenant-Colonels R. C. Browne-Clay- ton (Cheshires), G. D. Price (Bedford- shires) and F. A. Maxwell, V.C. (Middle- sex Regiment), and Brevet Lieutenant- Colonel P. W. Game (Royal Artillery) are gazetted brigadier-generals. Delegates of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers and' the Boilermakers' Society, who are now in London in con- nection with the Man Power problem, met again on Friday morning. The pro- ceedings were again private. Exemption on the ground of domestic hardship was refused to a pictu re-housc manager with < £ 1,200 a year by the Lan- arkshire Appeal Tribunal on Thursday, the sheriff saying that the hardship was as great on a man with only .£2 a week. General Sir John Maxwell called at Buckingham Palace on Friday, and was received in audience by the King, on the relinquishment of his Irish Command to take up the duties of the Northern Oom- mand. His Majesty invested Sir John with the Insignia of the Grand Cross of the Bath. The death of Mrs. Edith Mary Mills, wife of Mr. Frederick Mills, J.P., DL.. managing director of the Ebbw Vale Steel Iron and Coal Company, has occurred at Llwyndu Curt, Abergavenny. Mrs. Mills, who had been in failing health for many months, took an active part in the re- ligious and social life of Ebbw Vale. The death occurred at Beverley on Fri- day morning of Mr. Frank Fitzroy Lam- bert. aged 61, head of Lambert and Smith, one of the largest seed and oil broking firms in the port of Hull. The deceased was a director of the North Eastern Railway Co., a director of the Hull Shipping Exchange, and a director of the Hull Pacific Exchange.

I REV OSCAR SNELLING

I REV. OSCAR SNELLING. The Rev. Oscar Snelling, of Swansea, has been laid up for several days.

AT 4d A QUART

AT 4d. A QUART. A farmer told the Carnarvonshire Ap- peal Tribunal on Thursday that by careful feeding he could sell milk at 4d. a quart- and make a profit.

MAYORS ENQUIRY OFFICE I

MAYOR'S ENQUIRY OFFICE. The Mayor of Swansea desires us to make it known that he has arranged to open an enquiry office at No. 15, Somerset- place (Borough Treasurer's Department), every day from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., under the charge of Mr. Wm. Evans, and that all persons, including relatives of de- ceased soldiers and sailors, desiring help I and guidance in any way should apply in the first instance at that office.

t BOUND FROM SWANSEAi

t BOUND FROM SWANSEA. Sir Samuel Evans, in the Admiralty Division, on Thursday, concluded the hearing of the action brought by Messrs. Furnees, Withy and Co., owners of the steamer Thornley, of Newcastle, against the owners of the Norwegian steamer Rabbi in respect of a collision in the Bristol Channel in July. The defendants counter-claimed, and their captain, in the course of his evidence, told an extra- ordinary story of the ginking of his vessel by a German submarine while he was on a voyage from Swansea, with coal, a few wep-kr! later. The President held that the speed of the Rabbi was excessive, and that that vessel caused the collision. There would i be judgment for the plaintiffs.

RUSH FOR SUGARI

RUSH FOR SUGAR. I Remarkable scenes were witnessed on Thursday in a Leeds greengrocer's shop, where sugar is being sold in any quan- tity at sd. a pound. Other grocers refuse ¡ to sell sugar unl ess other purchases I amount to 2s. From early morning until early afternoon 1 he 6bop wet- ,e- sieged by men and women of all « anxious to make pu^chitsas. Well dressed men and women carried portmanteaux ¡ of considerable size, and the crowd in- ¡ cluded men and women evidently of good social standing from towns all over York- shire. The largest request was for one cwt., which was taken away in a hand- cart. A woman who arrived hurriedly on the scene on a bicycle harangued well- dressed women on their want of patriot- t ism. The crowd of purchasers ignored her exhortations, and almost fought for admission to the shop. Early in the afternoon the greengrocer issued a notice that the supplies were exhausted till Friday.

MORE STEAMTRS SUNKI

) MORE STEAMTRS SUNK. I Lloyds reports that 11n Indian steamer San Biaranni and the Greek steamers Stvbanni Bebis and Oanis have been fHUlk by German submarine. Crews landed. Swedish :?ivainer Varring and the Danish steamer Tocrasa, of Copenhagen, :Djidp?lli for Kirkcaldy, have also been sunk bv German submarines. Crews landed. Hritish steamer Trevarfack has been [IiUnk.

Advertising

) SWANSEA LIEUTENANT KILLED. The only son of Mr. D. W. Jones, Hueldenê. Evorsley-road, Sketty, Sec.- Licut.. Lawrence Bertram Jones, is re- ported missing, believed killed. He was wit.b. his uncle, Mr. G. W. Fitt, in Rhodesia, when the rur broke out, and he was engaged in the expedition against German South Africa At the end of that campaign he was given a commission in the Linoolns. SWANSEA STOCK EXCHANGE. Swansea, Friday.—Dealings on the Swansea Stock Exchange to-day v.-tr- very restricted, the tone bein-j ftUi01. Amongst local securities E.C. Spelters wore dow. qt 43s. Sd-, at which price the market closes buyers. Stepneys irero rather better at 205. 6d. i ♦ 0 9. I