Collection Title: Cambrian Daily Leader

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
27 articles on this page
Advertising

I The Cambria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict. J

Advertising

■ q The London Office ef the C. I bria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), wtiere advertisements can be received 11 up to 7 o'clock each evening for I insertion in the next day's issue. a II Tel., 2276 Central. 1f

I THE PIRATE NOT SEEN SEEM I 01

 THE PIRATE NOT SEEN: SEEM  I 0- 1 I ARABIC'S LAST MOMENTS I CAPTAIN FINCH'S STORY OF A 1 DASTARDLY ACT. i I 1 ENGINE MOM HEROES I The story of the loss of the White Star liner Arabic is told in terse but vivid language by one of the rescued passen- gers and by the captain of the ill", 41-icd vessel. t As in ths case of the Lusitania, no wam- ing of the attack was given, the sub- marine doing its hideous work unseen by its victims. The smart work of the officers and crew j made possible the launching of fourteen boats, and thus the majority of lives were saved. Panic was noticeable by its absence. I About thirty of the survivors were in- ,j jured. Everything they possessed went li down with the ship. U WHAT A PASSENGER SAW. j Interviewed by the Cress Association's ) Queenstown correspondent, one of the i survivors of the Arabic, Mr C. H. Pringle, ■>' of Toronto, Canada, said they had a i beautiful passage Hom J?verpool down' I channel, and had little apprehension of I any danger. In the morning, when after breakfast most of the passengers went up on deck to enjoy the fresh air, the sea was calm and the atmosphere quite clear. Raising ,i his telescope, he noticed what appeared t -to be the track of a torpedo coming at h right angles for the Arabic. He saw no submarine whatever, then or later. I Quicker than I can relate it," he con- tinned, the torpedo, travelling at enor- taous speed, struck our steamer on the starboard side. The impact made her shake frightfully, and then there was an explosion. The Boats Ready. The passengers were by this time rush- ing frantically for the lifebelts. which "erB fortunately at hand at various Placee on the deck. Captain Finch was on the deck. giving orders. and the boats Were being got down over the side when luite suddenly the vessel commenced to unk, and in a few minutf? went down. There was no panic, h?jt naturally a good deal of excitement amongst the women and children, and they were first got into the tfoats. Considering that no warning was given by the brutal enemy, it is astonishing that a much larger propor- tion of these on hoard were not IOfjL Although a number of people were in the water when the Arabic went down. still the vast niajori- of those on board got safely into the lifeboats. After being in 1 the boats for some time, a ship came along and took us on board. The crew of the ship treated the. survivors very kindly, and in some cases clothing was distributed. Nothing was saved by either crew or passengers," but it is well to be alive, under the circumstances. Well Known Soprano Safe. London. Fri(-ia.r.-Iate last night and during the early hours of this morning lists of 122 cabin and 50 third-cla-ss pas- sengers, survivors of the torpedoed Arabic, were issued from thn offices of the White Star Line in London. Among the saved is the well known sopran i, Stella Carol, anxiety as to whose fate had heen considerable. Her husband is also among the rescued. Mr. J. F. A. Day, formerly manager in Dublin of the National Benefit Assurance Company, and his daughter, who were proceeding to Los Angelos to settle, are also safe. j INTERVIEW WITH CAPTAIN FINCH. A Thrilling Story. The Press Association's Qneenetown i correspondent telegraphs:— Captain V.,illiam Finch was eeen at his hotel last night at Queenstown. and said lie was on the bridge at the time, but saw no submarine. From the time of leaving Liverpool a sharp look-out had been kept, and all the i| lifeboats were swung out and made ready ? for use. The Henderson life rafts were  also in readiness, and lifebelts were placed I in prominent places on the deck, to be available in case of necessity. It was well that this was so, ae other- wise the consequences to the crew and passengers must have been lamentable, seeing that no warning whatever was given to them. and that the skim went down under in lees than ten minutes from i the time she was struck. He first noticed the track of the torpedo when it was ahout three thous- and feet away. It was coming at right angles for the ship, and struck her on the starboard side about hundred feet from the stern. I Fourteen Boats Launched. I A violent explosion followed, which blew one of the lifeboats clean off the ) deck and made pieces of it- Fourteen lYJats in all were got over the side, but I the two. last capsized just as the vemel i foundered, It was amazing to see how [ the stood straight up in the water before ( making the final plunge. He was carried down in the maelstrom, hut came to the anrface again after a minute or so. He found his leg had been injured by the wreckage, but it was a trifle, and did not cost him a thought. Heroes of the Engine Room. He at once noticed a few women and children in the water, and a couple of firemen assisted them afloat, until they were picked up hy one of the boatp. He was in the water about twenty minutes cfefore being rescued. The engine room staff behaved like heroes, and stood by their posts when they knew the ship was sinking. Third Engineer London, of Bootle, went, down in the ship, standing by 'his engines ta carry out his orders from the I bridge. Assistant Electrician Burns, Cap- tain Frnrh continued, was equally brave, and stood at the post, of duty. Nearly All Passengers Saved. I Tfeey wm in the boats about one-and-a- (Coatinned at foot of !teXt column.)

I THE PIRATE NOT SEEN SEEM I 01

(Continued, from preceding column.) half hours, when a ship came upon the scene and took on hoard those who were in some of the boats, another ship coming up soon after, and taking off those in the remaining three lxiats. In all, about 40 persons perished, most of whom were members of the crew. The total number aboard was 421. "il, 261 crew, and 160 passengers, mostly cabin passengers. About, 30 of the survivors, added Cap- tain Finch, were suffering from injuries. The survivors lost, everything, and some of them large sums of money. I No Local Passengers. The local agents for the White Star Line, Messrs. Perkins, Somerset-jilace, state that there were no Swansea book- ings for the Arabic I EIGHT PASSENGERS MISSING. Four Believed to be Americans. ) The Press Association was informed on inquiry at the offices of the White Star Company in I/ondon this morning, that ,the dlOlp of (IT5 passengers aboard the Arabi(:. wii-ii the exception of eight have been saved, and landed at Queenstown. Of the eight passengers unaccounted for, according to an official of the company, font 8TP Americans. bnt their names laaw*f«>t been ascer tamed-

MORE VICTIMS 0

MORE VICTIMS. -0 SIX VESSELS REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN I SUNK SW ANSEA SHIP IN THE LIST The German pirates have been extremely I busy, no fewer than seven vessels, includ- ing the White Star liner Arabic, having been sunk. The number of lives lost has not as yet been ascertained. The vessels, other than the Arabic., which is reported in another column, which have been sunk are men- tioned in the following report (Passed by Censor.) News was received in 6wansea on Fri- day that the s.s. New York City, which left the port on Wednesday, has been e." Ilk. A message received by the owners, Messrs. C. Hill and Company, Bristol, states that the whole of the crew is saved. Two Swansea, men are among the number. One is Ur. William Thomas, a carpenter on the ship, who is the youngest brother of Captain Alfred Thomas, the Chief Con- stable of the town. Mr. Thomas lived at West Cross. The sfecond man is Mr. W. Bell, an able bodied seaman. We are further informed by the local agents, the Atlantic Transport Company, that the crew has been landed at Queens- town. The steamship Baron Erskine, of Ardrossan, has been sunk. All the crew -numbering 1J(>—were saved. The Cardiff steamer Kestormel has also been sunk. The crew of 19 were saved. [The Baron Erskine (Captain J. Tasker) is a steel screw steamer of 5,585 gross and 3,505 net register. She was built in 1911. The two vessels mentioned have been to Swansea, but not recently.] A Lloyd's telegram received on Thurs- day night says:— The Dunsley, a British steamer, was torpedoed at the same time as the Arabic, but she is still floating. A message received on Friday morning pays: The crew of the steamer Dunsley, sunk yesterday, numbering 35 hands, have been, landed. One of the survivors is a nephew" of Captain Finch, of the Arabic. [The Dunsley is a steel screw steamer of 4,93ft tons gross. She was built by Wm. Grav and (k> Ltd., of West Hartle-! pool, for the London and Northern Steam- ship Company (Messrs. Pyman Bros.. Ltd.) in 1913. Her port of registry is London.] Information wae received in Cardiff on Thursday that the Norwegian steamer Sverresborg. outward bound with coal, had been sunk. Lloyd's report that the Spanish steamer Tenaeastills has been Bunk. Three of the crew were saved. NORWEGIAN VICILANCE German Submarine's Little Scheme Checked. Copenhagen. Friday.—The mail steamer Irma. while on a voyage from Newcastle to Norway, was yesterday hailed by a German submarine a little north of the Jaeteren's Beef. t It appears that- the hailing took place in Norwegian terri- torial waters. The Irma immediately swung Out her boats in obedience to the submarine's warning shots. In the meantime a Norwegian torpedo- boat arrived upon the scene and called the submarine commander's attention to the fact that he was in Norwegian waters, and protested against the action of the German vessel. The submarine thereupon retired. There were several British tourists on board the Irma. The steamer Drammensfjord yesterday passed ITitteroe at the mouth of Ilekkef- ford, escorted by a Norwegian torpedo- boat.

IITALY DEMANDS SATISFACTION

ITALY DEMANDS SATISFACTION. Rome, Thursday.—Instructions have been given to the Italian Ambassador in Cosstantinople to obtain immediate satis- faction for the unwarrantable action of the Turkish authorities in preventing the departure of Italians from Turkey. The firm language lise(I by Baron Son- nino. the Foreign Minister, to the Turkish Ambassador is considered to be a sign of tli" approahing rupture of delations.— Reuter.

SLIPPED FROM FATHERS HAND

SLIPPED FROM FATHER'S HAND. The Lancaster County Police report the death of Samuel Baxter (14), the son of Samuel Baxter, fisherman, of Morecambe. The lad was assisting his father to haul in a net. off Piel Walney. when he over- balanced and fell into the sea. The father grabbed at the boy, but missed him. In his snrond effort, how- ever, he caught the boy's hand. hut tlvs boat, was going so fast that he slipped away and was drowned.

ANOTHER FORT CAPTUREDI I

ANOTHER FORT CAPTURED BERLIN CLAIM I NOVO GEOSCIVSK SAID TO HAVE FALLEN KAISERS ARRIVAL A Reuter's Amsterdam message says it is officially announced in Berlin that Novo Georgivsk has been captured. Over ",OC4) pr.soners feii into the hands of the Germans. The Emperor Wilhelm has arrived at Novo Georgivsk. Writing in Land and Water," Mr. Ililaire Belloc says of Novo Georgievsk: Its abandonment by the retiring Russians is aw ise move." Amsterdam, Thursday.—To-day's Ger- man official e)lum uniq U SRJS (Army Group of Marshal you Hinden- burg.) In Kovno a further 30 officers and 3,900 men have been taken prisoners. Under pressure of the capture of Kovno the Rus- sians are evacuating their positions oppo- c-ite Kalvaria and Suwalki, pursued by our troops. Further south German troops have forced a crossing on the Narew east of Tykocin, capturing 800 Russians. The army of neneral yon Gallwitz is proceeding eastwards north of Bielsk. The railway from Bial vstok to Brest Litowsk has been reached and 2,000 Russians cap- tured. In the sector north-east of Novo Georgiewsk our troops have conquered the Wakra district. Two forts on the northern fronts have been stormed, and there we captured over a thousand prisoners and 125 guns. (Army Group of Prince Leopold of Bavaria.) Our left wing, continually fighting, drove the enemy before them, and in the evening reached ihe district westi and south-west of Mielejizyde. The right wing. which crossed the Bug near Mielnik, has driven the enemy from strong positions north of this sector, and is now further advancing. (Army Group of General von Macken- sen.) Between Niemirow and Janow a cross- ing of the Bug has been forced by the Allies. Before Brest-Litowsk the German troops have penetrated the advanced positions of the £ ortre*s -near RokitnO, south-east of Janow. East of Wlodawa our troops are pursuing the defeated Pnemy. Under pressure of our advance the enemy has evacuated the east bank of the Bug below and above Wlodawa. Pursuit is continuing. Brest I>itowsk is the great fortress on the east of the Bug between Janow and Wlodawa. upon which the enemy's en- circling movement has been directed. Kalvaria and Suwalki are towns abolit five and eight miles respectively south- west of Kovno. Novo Georgiewsk is a fortress two or three mile, north-east, of Warsaw. Petrograd, Thursday.—An official com- munique says:— Our warships protecting the entrance to I the Gulf of Riga, yesterday drew closer in | aft?r a n?hf, owing to the great super- iority of the enemy's fleet. THE PRICE OF KOVNO. Three Weeks' Effort Cost I Enemy 120,000 Men. Geneva, Thursday, Aug. HI.-Telegrams to the Tribune do Geneve from Inns- bruck state that the capture of Kovno has cost the Germans several army corps. In the last three weeks the Germans have lost on the Dubissa 30,000 men, and on the Niemen 90,000 men. The daily I losses around Kovno were 8,000 to 10,000, and the total losses 120,000, not including l those of the last forty-eight hours. lrin- den burg has been unable to fill the gaps, and has been obliged to despatch assist- ance to the army of Prince Leopold of Bavaria. Day of Terrible Butchery. I At 4 p.m. on August 17, after an unpre- cedented bombardment of the Kovno forts, the Germans launched an attack with thirteen divisions (260.000 men). A terrible butchery followed, lasting several The Russians fought with the bayonet to the end, and then the re- mainder cut their way through the Ger- mans and succeeded in joining their main army. The Germans, without losing any time, are continuing their march on Vilna. The armies of von Gallwitz and von Woyrsch will join before Brest-Litovsk. whose capture the Germans have decided is imperative. Their enormous guns are now bombarding Novo Georgievsk, whose outer forts have been pulverised. According to a later telegram, a battle on a large scale is in progress at Brest- Lit ovsk between the Archduke Joseph and the Russians.

THE ENEMYS LOSSESI

THE ENEMY'S LOSSES Estimate Puts Total at Nearly 9,000,000. Tne British Weekly" states:—We have seen an interesting estimate this week of the total casualties in the Ger- man, Austrian, and Turkish Armies up to July 1. The statement comes from a trustworthy French source. Hors de 1 billed. Wounded. Prisoners. Combat. Germans. 1.63:1.000 1,877,000 780,000 4,290,000 Austrians, 1,1)00,000 1,850,000 900,000 4,350,000 Turks. J(}o.OOO. 150,000 100.000 3.,0.00(1 1- _PH-h q- j 3.333.000 3.877.000 1.780,000 8-990.000 I Thp Turkisl1 ('a:,ualh may appear ?Tja?. b?t it mus? be remembered ?hat .n the early days of the war flier* was very i, hayyfihbng in the Caucasus.

r A FORT EVACUATED 1

r A FORT EVACUATED 1 i ACCURATE ITALIAN FIRE CAUSES AUSTRIANS. TO FLEE SLlCHT PROGRESS IN CARSO I Romp, Thursday.—This evening's offi- cial communique says:— In the Tonale zone our artillery has seriously damaged the enemy's fort known as Grozzi Alti. The defenders were obliged to evacuate it and were followed up by our fire. In the Upper Cordevo le, the enemy, after having attempted in vain to drive our troops from their positions. directed their fire against the hamlet and church of I'iev-e di Livinarongo, causing an out- break of fire. In tlie Upper Rieux appreciable progre&s has been made. We have occupied a re- doubt on Monte Patern-) and captured a line of trenches near Trecrochi, making 21 prisoners. In the Tolmino sector violent counter- attacks were delivered by the enemy on the night of August ISth against the posi- tions which had been won by our troops. They were completely repulsed. We have also made slight progress on the Cargo lines, making 53 prisoners and one quick-firing gun. The enemy displays increasing activity in the use ol aeroplanes for reconnoitring and offensive purposes. Our aviators, who. by their continual daring exploits have contributed so greatly to the success- ful progress of our operations, constitute, in conjunction with our anti-aircraft ar- tillery. an effective defence against the enemy's dforts

I NATIONAL SERVICE SUGGESTED j

NATIONAL SERVICE SUGGESTED j Hints of a Bill During the I Coming Session. The Lobby correspondent of the South W ales Daily Nows It is cx- ceedingly probable, if not. certain, that pioposals for national service will be laid before Parliament, euch servioe to include, conscription for the fighting forces of men ol military age not employed in mining or other work necessary to the carrying o.i of the war. the supply of munitions, or in such industries as are considered to be vital to the maintenance of a sufficient, export trade to establish abroad credits on as large a scale as possible." On the other hand, the Cambria Dailv leader" is intormed that the Government does not favour national service unless it becomes absolutely nocessary.

I SWAtfSEA S FM RESMttSE I

I SWAtfSEA S F)M RESMttSE Lord Tredegar Expresses Thanks During Flying Visit. On his way hark from Tenby, the Eight Hon. Viscount Tredegar broke his jour- i noy at. Swansea, where he made a call at Lieutenant John llodgen's office.'the re- cruiting centre for the Royal Naval Divi- sion. Lord Tretlegar expressed his apprecia- tion of the reception Swansea had ac- corded him on the occasion of his recent visit, and also of the number of recruits that the town had sent up to his battalion Prior to this month it is forty years since he wa.s here, but Ix>rd Tredegar made » piomise that he will visit Swansea agai i i] the near fut ire. Li2utenant.Hodgens and Captain man lunched with him at the Mctropole Hotel, and the party then paid a visit to the Picture House, High-street, wliere the film taken in connection with Lord Tredegar's recent visit to Swansea was shown. Prior To leaving for Newport by motor, his lordship expressed his thanks to the local press for the support given to the Naval Division movement.

A PORTUGUESE VICTORYI

A PORTUGUESE VICTORY I Lisbon, Thursday.—A Portuguese de- tachment on the 13th inst. entered Cua- maty, and on the lath occupied the fort- ress of that name after fighting. Chief Hoba and followers fled.

BRITISH LOAN IN NEW YORK I

BRITISH LOAN IN NEW YORK. New York, Thursday.—The Exchange to-day was awaiting the result of the rumoured negotiations between bankers for a large British loan. The said loa.n will not exceed 150.000,000 dollars, which is not enough to meet the' existing obliga- tions.

TURKS INCREDIBLE SAVAGERY

TURKS' INCREDIBLE SAVAGERY. Petrogra 1, Thursday.—As illustrating Turkish and Kurdish acts of savagery in the Vilayet of Bitlis, in one large village only thirty-six persons escaped massacre. In another scores were tied together and thrown into the lake of you, and in another < ne thousand were locked in a voodcn building and burned.

LOCAL MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

LOCAL MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL. Mr..T. W. Thorpe, the clerk to the magistrates for the division of Pontar- dawe and deputy magistrates' clerk for Swansea, has been appointed by the Minister of Munitions as clerk to the Munitions Tribunal for the district of South-West Wales, which includes Swan- sea, Pembroke Pock, Fishguard, Neath. Port Talbot, Llanelly, etc.

I SEEING ZEPPELINS IN SWANSEA I

"SEEING ZEPPELINS" IN SWANSEA. I At Swansea Police Court on Friday, before Mr. H. A. Chapman (in the chair), Dr. Nelson Jones Mr. J. Rees. and Mr. Gwilym Morgan, .lames Smith (41), laliourer. and > ifrerf Henry Gihhs (fish hawker) were fined .Ss. and 7s. 6d..e- spectively on charges of drunkenness. The evidence against the latter was that while drunk he was shouting that llicre were Zeppelins over the town. Tlie eon- stable asked. Whereand the man pointed to two stars. Defendant now said this was quite true. He rair something in the shape <-»f a meteor abo-ut eight minutes past eleven.

THE CREAT RETREATI I

THE CREAT ] RETREAT. I I WHERE GERMANY HAS FAILED. RUSSIAN WITHDRAWAL "THE FINEST THING IN HISTORY OF WAR." tfttWIYUPLANS DEFEATED j Deling this week in Laud and lratl"" Vntk the Russian retreat, lr. Jiloire Belloc says that iï our alJ" brings the great attempt off and fulfils ills Plan, it will be one of the finest things ever done in the kistoiT of war." A retirement is a retirement, and to that extent, a confession of in- eriority; an advance is an advance, and to that extent a proof of teiuporarilv .silpc,iior power. But the enemy does not adnmee in order to compel his opponent to retire; he advances in the hope of cutting off at least portions of the retirin" army during the process; if possible enveloping the whole. If that be not pos- sible, at least in inflicting such severe losses that his foe shall be crippled. The student; -of strategy j6 interested then once the abandonment of such a great salient is found neeessarv, almost entirely in the success or failure of the perilous mancouvie. ?or, 3f i). gneceed? the expenses in men and maV teriat to which the advancing force has been put are; strategically speaking, thrown a way. Weighty political res-ults may follow the advance; the retirement may depress the moral of the army con- demned to it.; btit isti-a'clegjca]!N. -f he whole point is whether the retreat has been accomplished according to the plan of its uglier command or no, and whether it has been carried out without suffering the oss of any grave portion of its total force by cutting off. If this is dene, especially if it is done in an operation of such enormous scab' as that of the recent Russian abandon- ment. of the Warsaw salient, it is a triumph, not for The offensive, but for the defensive, whi.-h that offensive has at- templed, and failed, to destroy. First Principles, I In the light, ot these obvious first prin- ciples. Mr. HelIoe proceeds to examine the Russian retirement. There are, he savs, in this great operation, three points on which we must concentrate our attention at the present moment. First, the failure of the great enmnv orces upon the .Narev froat to break through and so press upon and confuse the K^ssum retirement as to cause disaster wlJile that retirement was still in progress. Second, the isolated position of Novo (leorgeievsk and the task which that fort. ress is expected to perform in the next development of the war. "Third, and most important, the price which the enemy has paid in that, vast scheme which has, at the moment of writing (August lti), quite failed to achieve its object." A Double Attempt. On Angust Hi, the enemv issues a bulletin to the effect that he lias broken the Narev front." But Mr. Belloc observes that what has happened is quite another thing. There was a double attempt at the rapid envelopment oitthe Russian salient —the great advance upon Lublin and Chohn from tl^p .south, and the great, ad- vance upon the Narev from the north— the latter was really the marching wing of the manoeuvre. On the northern wing everything depended. It was precisely that northern wing which failed in its task. It had to come down between 30 and 40 miles in, say, a fortnight, if it was to confuse the evacuation of Warsaw and Ivangorod and to interrupt the retirement of the main Russian column. The Russian rearguards, vastly inferior in number, as a rearguard must be, so pounded and held this German hammer- blow upon the Karev front that it has I advanced not in two weeks, but in five, l not 40 miles, but less than 20—and in most places less than ].')! It was held tight till the end of the second week in August. while the main Russian bodies drew away. Only then, the manoeuvre thoroughly effected, did the Narev screen withdraw— or as the German phrase will have it, break." A Local If!Strat-on. I This thesis is vividly iHustratedby translating the operations into terms of English geography, in which the Thames represents the Narev. The Russian army is conceived of as standing from Birming- ham, to the neighbourhood of London, and tlience curling round north-eastward tliimrgh Essex ahd Suffolk to Great Yar- mouth. The enemy struggles to cross the Thames, hut in most places does not sue-1 ceed. until, at last, on August H. the re-! treat northwards of the main body on to the distant line—Birmingham—Ely—Yar- mouth. now accomplished, the screen de- fending the Thames line falls back, and the. enemy, which had nearly taken thirfy days to master the river, calls it break- ing a front." The fort of Novo Georgievsk has Iwen left surrounded by the advancing enemy, and by this means, the use of the Vistula as a water way for munition barges has been f>1{)ked. The chances of continued resistance in Novo Georgievsk are, Mr. Belloc points out, not within our powers of calculation. We know that old permanent works can be dominated in a few hours by the nwdenl siege train: but by moving fort- ress artillery into temporary works, a de- fensive system is capable, under certain conditions, of almost indefinitely prolonged resistance. If Novo Georgievsk li4nlds out. it hampers the whole soheme of the Aust ro-German advance. The Price Paid i 'Con?Mcrins' thp qo?<.Ktn of the price paid.Mr.?ip?oc says what matters is the comparison between what you have I achieved and the price at which you have achieved i1, which is the whole basis of I judgment, and that there is hprp a dif- ference perpetually appearing between the way in which instructed and imin-s+rucfed opiniOfl regards any military wtuafion. iCon+inued at foot of next column.)

THE CREAT RETREATI I

(Continued from preceding column.) Instructed opinion looks upon war in such a totally different light that, it has some difficulty even in understanding the newspaper terrors of the day. If does net comprehend a state of mind in which prophecy can be presumed upon until some decision is apparent, and the idea that ad vances or retreats are decisions seem to it as wild as the, idea that a. elmm collar and a top hat are a hank balance." ( No seal is yet set on the eastern cam- paign, and in spite of the fact that the enemy have done their very utmost with ■shell under conditions where the big gnr• had it all its own way. it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that the Pnernr has failed in his main endeavour. rThp fortress of Novo Georgievisk has since fallen, according to a Berlin com- munique.]

THEWAR I

THEWAR I Resume of To-day's Messages. I Leader" Offire, 5.0 p.m. I The German Imperial Chancellor, in a lengthy speech to the Reichstag, blamed Great Britain and Russia for fli-m out- break of war. He claimed that Berlin had intervened between Austria and Russia, and made possible an under- standing. hut British statesmen bad mie- led the British public, and had acted in such a manner as to provoke war. The. speech was obviously designed to in- fluence the Balkan States. Ia addition to the Arabic, six other vessels were" on Thursdav night e-unk at. a. indudiug the well-known local trader, the New York City, the crew of which included two Swansea men. Berlfti announces that the Russian fortress Novo Georgivsk: has fallen, the garrison of 20,000 being taken prisoners. The Kaiser has arrived at the l'ortretss. A Rome communique reports that the enemy has evacuuetd Grozzi Alti fort, in the Tonale zone. Good progress has been made in the Upper Rieux, and enemy aerial attacks are well held by our Allies' aircraft.

MINISTERS MEETI

MINISTERS MEET I The Prsmser and Lord Kitchener Confer. I/ord Kitchener visited the Prime Minister at. 10, Downing-street at eleven o'clock on Friday morning. A small com- laittee ol the Cabinot was present at the interview between the two Minister*. Auiong its members were Sir Edwaxd Grey, the Marquis of Crewe, Mr. Churchill,' and Mr. McKemia. This committee remained in session for an hour prior to the general meeting of the Cabinet at noon. The !ntt?)- meeting tile !tbiii(,t at nof)n. i?f?I the private entrance in the. Horse Guards. A crowd of sightseers gathered in Down- ing-ftreet to witness the arrival of the Ministers, bitt there was no demonstra- tion. A cinematograph picture was taken of the arrival of the Ministers.

BOOKS FOR THE TROOPS

BOOKS FOR THE TROOPS To-day's Acknowledgments. Twenty-five volumes are addpd to-day to the collection of books for the troops through the Leader." Handsomely as our readers have done in this direction, the cry from the men on active porriee i? irtore.still more." Seeing how fond Tommy is of literature, and the difficul- ties in the way of his getting it. the ap- peal is one that should not h(' ignored. To-day's acknowledgments are: Ashley," J'entregcthin-rd., periodicals and 11 A. P. H." H Received to-day 4" 25 Already acknowledged .A686 Total 47U

FRENCH STORE OF COLD

FRENCH STORE OF COLD. Paris, Tbu"daY.-Af,-c,)r(Li r g to (.he "Matin, n'ore than £ 18.200,000 jn gold has been deposited in the vaults of the Bank of France during the last seven weeks.

CHINAMANS BOMB MISCARRIES

CHINAMAN'S BOMB MISCARRIES. Shanghai. Thursday. A Chinaman threw a bomb at Admiral Tseng, the mili- tary governor of Shanghai, as he was en- tering his motor-car in the French eon- cassion this afternoon. The bomb mieeel its mark. and exploded against a wall. One person was injured.—Reuter.

GIPSYS UNEDUCATED CHILDREN

GIPSY'S UNEDUCATED CHILDREN. At Neath on Friday, Frank IE-am, a gipsy, was fined, 20s. tor failing to provide his four children with an elementary edu- cation hy wandering from pla-ce to place. The case was proved by 1'.8. Quarterly, Xeatli Abbey. The children, the eldest of whom was 12 years of age, could neither read or write.

SWANSEA BOY INJURED AT PLAY

SWANSEA BOY INJURED AT PLAY It is a rare occurrence when a motor accident, happens in which the driver does not see the luckless victim, but fiuch was the case when on Thursday, a lorry, owned by Messrs. H. Holwill and Co., ran over and seriously injured a nine-year-old boy named George Pugsley, of 5, Paxton- terrace, Swansea. The lad was playing near his home when the unfortunate affair occurred, and apparently he ran into the lorry, being run over by the back wheel of the motor. lie was conveyed to the Hospital with all possible speed, and is now progressing fairly will. It is quite clear that, the driver was in no way to blame. The lnd's father is at present serving his country in France.

Advertising

AMERICA SHOCKED. Tense Situation Aggravated by Arabic Loss. Washin^tijn, Friday.-—'l ho 01 the sinking of the Arabic cainc ao a s-hock to tùo who had iiopod that after tho st jinny there would be no further aggra- Yadom. of t? already tcn? t.ituation- '1 he torpedoing' without warning of a 1%??('l (-ai-i,,ying ic -Is lioiiited ..lit, has beyn pronounced a violation oi the rights of the United States, aJtt if rotated may be regarded as a deliber- "iidly President Wilson the ciitiv- afternoon trying to obtain details of the disaster. SHIPPING LOSSES FOR A WEEK. The weekly returns of British vessele lost by hostile action issued by the Ar- miralty through the. Press Bureau this afternoon shows that during the week ending August 18th, two British mer- chant vessels were sunt by mines, and 11 by submarines, the gross tonnage being 22,970, while ten small British fishing vessels were sunk or captured. The gross tonnage of these wae 647. The total arrivals and sailings of the over- Eea steamers of all nationalities to and from the United Kingdom ports (over 300 tons net) was 1,480 against 1,396 in the preceding week. ONLY FIVE UN/ACCOUNTED FOR. The name of another eurvivor of file Arabic, Thomas Elmore, was officially announced at the London offices of the "1'0 'f L' > I V. Star Lin. this afu-iccon, ÜlcLi I lea\ ing only iivc r.a.»t-r>ogcrs to be ac- counted fur. HEAVY GEHMAN LOSSES, PARIS, Thursday, i lie ioil-V. ir.g communique was issued tliih afterncon: — The same activity continued oil the border?, of the Oi»*\ io the north of the ^isno, in Champagne and £ >d tic' frem o. La Seille. i" Argonne there vn., mine fighting in 111,. region of Vienne la Chateau and > liratsrtuaenolo ib* German losses wera v< ry heavy, and a great number of dead bodies were found in the 250 metres of trenches which were captured. ENGLISH PROGRESS IN GALLIPOLI Paris, Fridar.-An ofticiul report from the Dardanelles states: In the Southern, zone there is nothing to report except patrol fighting and artille.-y engage- ments. In the northern zone the English left wing made progies* in the Anasarta plain.