Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
TONDU ARMS TONDU I

TONDU ARMS, TONDU. I LANDLADY FINED £8 FOR "TECHNICAL I OFFENCE"! Before Alderman Wm. Llewellyn (chairman) and other Magistrates at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, breaches of the Orders of the Liquor Control Board were allaged against Elizabeth Stanford, aleehouse keeper, Tondu Arms, who was charged with selling after 9 p.m., and George Lloyd, blacksmith, Tondu, and Rowland Hill, collier, Coytrahen, who were in trouble for "attempting to consume beer," and thus attempting to contravene the Order, on October list. 1 Hr, W. la. Thomae appeared for the licensee, w ho was too ill to attend, and in proof a medi- cal certificate was put in. Ilrefendant's advo- cate put in a plea of guilty, and, later, raised points in mitigation. P.S. David said that at 9.25 on the night in question, in plain clothes, and in company with P.C. Osborne, he kept the side entrance of the Tondu Arms under observation. At 9.27 Geo. Lloyd came from the back premises, and en- tered the kitchen, by the side door, leaving the door open about 9 inches. After a short time he called to some one to "look sharp," and put some money on the table. In two minutes the landlady came in from the bar with two glasses of beer, which she placed on the table, one in front of Lloyd, and the other qn the corner of the table. Subsequently she picked up the money Lloyd had deposited. They (the police) then entered the kitchen, and the landlady, see- ing them, rushed away. There were three men in the kitchen—Charles Barry, and the defend- ants Lloyd and Rowland Hill, sitting opposite a. glass of beer on the corner of the table. Barry said he had partaken of nothing except lemon- ade, and he showed his empty glaes. Later, a little girl, who acted as a domestic servant, said "All the drink here I supplied before 9 o'clock." "Not these two glasses," witness observed, be- cause I saw the landlady bring them in." The landlady denied supplying the beer, and witness told her what he had seen. Lloyd also said that he had not paid for any beer. For the defence, Mr. W. M. Thomas pleaded that Lloyd, who was a regular customer was not able to leave work sufficiently early to get a drink. Upon the premises, he saw Hill, whose wife assists in the household work. It was true they asked for a drink, which was at first re- fused, and Mrs. Stanford consented only after the request had been three times repeated. His (Mr. Thomas') instructions were that money was not actually handed over-though payment, no doubt, was intended. That constituted a technical offence, and in these hard times he asked for leniency in behalf of these men, one of whom was engaged about the house, whilst the other, a regular customer, had not had a drink that day. » A previous oonvietion was handed in, and Mrs. Stanford was fined JG8. Lloyd and Hill were fined -83 each.

PBNCOBD

PBNCOBD. COMMITTEE FOR WELCOMING SOL- DIERS.—It i. a regrettable fact that no or- ganised effort has been in existence in the Tillage to aecord a welcome to soldiers and sailors on leave from active service. It is per- 4 haps better late than never, and a committee which met on Friday evening have decided to- meet every home-coming soldier and sailor. A public welcome will also be organised. SOLDIER'S HOMF-COMIN--G.-IAast week a young soldier belonging to one of the old families of the village came home from Singa- pore. We refer to Gunner D. H. Watkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Watkins, Tyradair. Gun- ner Watkins was stationed with his battery at Singapore for about eighteen months. He arrived in the Far East immediately after the mutiny of a native regiment. He helped to hunt out the mutineers who, after murdering several officers and civilians, escaped in various directions. The gunner on the whole looks well after his experiences. MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY.— On Friday the usual weekly meeting of the Penooed Mutual Improvement Society was held at Trinity Schoolroom, Mr. Owen James pre- siding. There was a fine attendance of mem- bers and a most suocessful debate. The sub- ject dealt with was The Cinema-is its influ- ence good or evil?" Mr. Robert Roberta first read a paper in condemnation of the Cinema, followed by another by Miss Elsie Wilkins in its defence. The debate that followed was a most interesting one. A most cheering feature of the evening was the participation in the debate of quite a number of the younger members of the Society who had never attemp- ted anything of the kind before. Both readers replied to the criticisms passed. The voting showed a substantial majority in favour of the Cinema. WICKLIFFE PREACHERS.—On Thursday two Wickliffe preachers visited the village and conducted two lantern services at Trinity Chapel, which was lent for the occasion. The first service, whcih was for children, was crowded, and was under the presidency of Mr.\ J. Edwards-Evans. Slides were shown illus- trating the place of the Bible in the History of England. Interesting explanations of the pic- tures were given by Mr. Wilmot. The service for adults was taken by Mr. Mortimer, the slides shown being of the same character as at the children's meeting. At the close grati- tude to the two preachers upon their visit was expressed by the Rev. D. W. Howell and Mr. W. H. Pickering. It may be stated that the Wickliffe preachers are a body organised to combat Ritualism in the Church of England. During the war, however, all controversial ac- tivity is suspended, and the preachers confine themselves to purely evangelical and: evange- listic work. -CONCERT.-On Wednesday evening a con- cert was held aft the Public Hall. The object was the provision of Christmas gifts for the Pencoedians in the Navy and Army. District Councillor J. T. Salathiel made an admirable chairman. In his opening address, an ac- count was given of the tobacco and comforts fund organised by the Parish Council, and main tamed by a weekly house-to-house collec- tion in the village. It was explained why par- continued on Bottom of Next Column).

PBNCOBD

(Continued from previous column). eels, in some cases, have failed to reach their destination, as when, as sometimes happens, removals take place at the front. In other cases the clerk of the Council was not noti- fied of the change of address. After the sing- ing of the National Anthem, the following programme was proceeded with:—Song, Mr. Evan Samuel; song, Miss L. Wilkins; recita- tion, Mr. J. O. Pearce; song, Mr. W. Lewis; song, Miss Olwen Pearce; song, Mr. George Harries; conjuring entertainment, Mr. Rich- ard Thomas; quartette, Miss A. M. Lewis, Miss S. J. Lewis Miss Olwen Pearce and Miss Lena Wilkins; song, Mr. W. Lewis; song, Mrs T. Evans; "Limericks, Mr. Ivor Howell; song, Miss S. J. Lewis; song, Mr. George Harries. All the artistes, with one excep- tion, were from Pencoed, and the reception given showed that they were not without hon- our in their own country. The support, in the choruses, of a smaH glee party, livened up the proceedings. Mr. J. T. Howell, B.A., acted as accompanist throughout. A vote of thanks to the chairman, the artistes, and all who had helped was moved by the Rev. D. W. Howell, seconded by Mr. Jonah Davies, and supported by Mr. W. J. Walford. The Chairman, in a few closing words, appealed for support of the Belgian Refugees in the vill- age.

IHEOLYCYW AND DISTRICT NOTES I

HEOLYCYW AND DISTRICT NOTES I By "SILURIAN." I The good people of Rhiwceiliog continue to perpetuate the good old institution of Memo- rial Sunday—Sul y coffa-and I, for one, ad- mire them for doing so. A memorial service to the late Mr. loan Williams, Bryngwenith Farm, was held on Sunday evening, when the Rev. Beynon, Port Talbot, preached a ser- mon which was very appropriate for the oc- casion. Formerly when the memorial ser- vice was over, relatives and friends wended their way to the burial ground, and knelt in a circle silently around the grave. Probably the custom had its origin in the Roman Catho- lic rite of praying for the repose of the soul of the departed, but the custom was no less touching for that reason Personally, I regret the relegation of the pathetic institution of Sul y coffa to the limbo of things that were. Ill The industrial aspect of Heolycyw and dis- trict was perhaps never brighter than at pre- sent. Very satisfactory progress is being made at Brynwyth and Spion Kop, the output of which has now attained 400 tons per day, while Werntaro, where great developments are anticipated, already employs 100 men and youths, and has a daily output of over 100 tons. Considerable difficulty is experi- enced in obtaining sufficient labour, and.to ob- tain a house in the district is now an utter impossibility. 111 There is a strong feeling at Heolycyw that the postal authorities should provide the place with telegraphic or telephonic means of com- munication, or both, and a money order office. Much smaller villages, such as Coy church and Blackmill, have had these facilities for years, and we should have had them two or three years ago were it not for the lethargy and in- aptitude of our Parish Council. Indeed, the postal authorities offered a telephonic install- ation in March, 1913, on condition that the Parish Council guaranteed a revenue of L12 per annum, and with the recent addition to our population, the Council should no longer hesitate to give that guarantee. It is only the difference between the actual revenue and the JB13 that would have to be provided, and in our parish it is quite possible to save any such difference a hundred-fold in other direc- tions. Ill Another facility greatly needed here is that of railway passenger service, and it will never be obtained without insistently and persis- tently knocking at the doors of the G.W.R. authorities. In fairness to the Council itself, I do not think it lays claim to having done anything to benefit the electors since its elec- tion in April, 1913. While the fight for the retention of the Commons for its rightful owners was going on, it adopted a policy of lying low and doing nothing. Here, however, is an opportunity for it to retrieve its charac- ter. Let it secure postal and railway facili- ties for Heolycyw and Coychurch Higher. Let it also forthwith provide suitable allotments for the many here who justifiably hunger for them. Yes, let it immediately do all this, and much will be forgiven and forgotten. Ill I receive weekly, more or less, letters from Heolycyw men who are with the colours fight- ing for their King and country. All these letters, I rejoice to say, are in buoyant and confident mood. Pte. Wallace Wakefield, Welsh Regiment, who has seen much hard fighting for nearly two years, writes in jubi- lant spirits this week, and tells me the only thing that worries him is that he so seldom meets Heolycyw men, and adds that he would be delighted to meet my son Iwan, who is with a gas section of the R.E. Pte. J. Jones, also of the Welsh Regiment, has blossomed forth in the trenches into a poet of no mean degree. He has sent home five touching verses on Struck Down by Shrapnel," and I venture to insert one of them here:— He fought like a hero, And faced every danger; He charged the big Uhlan Through woodland and dell, But fell in the front line; The victory completed They found him with others Struck down by shrapnel. Ill The pinch of high prices for the necessaries of life is felt here as elsewhere. In many cases this cannot be avoided, but there is a growing feeling that home productions are un- neoeesarily high, and that some measures should be taken to moderate them. How to give this feeling a practical turn is occupying some of the best minds in the village, and we are not without hope that some good may re- sult to the hard pressed from these mental cogitations.

OGMORE YALE PRESENTATION

OGMORE YALE PRESENTATION. DOWIE" ISAACS HONOURED. I An interesting little ceremony took place at the Non-Political Club and Institute on Mon- day of last week, Mr. E. Hare presiding, when Pte. G. Isaacs (Dowie), K.S.L.I.), Military Medalist, was presented with a handsome cigarette case, suitably inscribed, by the com- mittee of the club, and a purse of gold by the members. Both presentations were made by Mr. D. J. Mansel, the genial secretary of the club, in a few well-chobpn words, and Pte. Isaacs, in modest style, responded. He thanked all the members from the bottom of his heart. For his country's sake, he would do the same deed again that won him the Military Medal. He would always cherish the gifts handed to him that night. Mr. Hare (the Chairman) said that they had met together to do honour to one of their oldest members, who had been successful in winning honours on the battlfield. He was sure everyone present felt happy to assist in doing so, as Pte. Isaacs was one of the most popular lads in Ogmore Vale. Short speech es were also made by Mr: J. Howe and Mr. John Lewis. In the musical programme that followed, the following took part:—Songs, Messrs. G. David (Peel), W. Griffiths, D. Noyes, T. Thomas, Shad Weeks, Orlando Howells, H. Wareham, G. H. Morgan, D. Williams, Bert Weeks, and others; recita- tions, Messrs. Tom Evans and Jim Swash. The accompanist was Mr. G. Orchard.

LICENSING LAPSE AT LALESTONI

LICENSING LAPSE AT LALESTON I LANDLORD OF THE "BELL," AND I LABOURER. Under the Liquor Control Order, at Bridg- end, on Saturday, John Joshua Thomas, licen- see of The Bell," at Laleeton, was summoned for permitting beer to be taken off the premises after the hour of 8 p.m., and William Jones, labourer, Ballast Farm, Pyle, was summoned as the defaulter who took it away, on November 4th. Mr. W. M. Thomas defended. Evidence was given by P.C. Stockford, who said that at 9.15 on Saturday night he was standing by the Bell, in High Street, Laleston, and saw William Jones leave by the back door, with his left-hand coat pocket rather bulky. Witness called upon him to stop. He took no notice, and walked on. Overtaking him after he had gone only a few yards, witness asked him What he had in his pocket? Not satisfied with his answer, he took him back to the Bell. There he saw the licensee, and asked him if he had supplied defendant with a flagon. He re- plied, "Yes; that man," pointing to Jones. Thomas, asked for an explanation, made no reply. Cross-examined: The beer was supplied before 8, and paid for before 8. For the defence, Mr. Thomas said Jones or- dered the flagon and paid for it, and the land- lord at the time told him he must take it off the premises before 8. He made answer that' that would be "quite all right," and the only question was the time he took the flagon off the premises. There was no evidence of a ealè after 8. The man might have taken the flagotf out of the house, and concealed it in a wall or some other place, at the back of the premi- ses, and for that the licensee surely could not be held responsible. In the absence of defendant Jones, who it was said, could not be found, P.C. Williams (Pyle) said that on the previous night he went to the farm, and saw Jones, who admitted having re- ceived the summons, but "was not going to the Police Court in the morning," and only hoped the fine would not be "very heavy." He also said he was "sorry it happened," and added: The landlady supplied me with a flagon a few minutes before 9, and I paid 9d. for it." Upon this evidence, Thomas was fined .£2, and Jones J61.

BOUTRBBNDOWN MANS COMMISSION

BOUTRBBNDOWN MAN'S COM- MISSION. OLD BOY OF BRIDGEND COUNTY SCHOOL. We are pleased to learn that Mr. Christopher Davies, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Davies, The Vines, Southerndown, has been gazetted Seoond- Lieutenant to the 6th Worcestershire Regiment. He received his training at St. Albans with the 18th London Regiment (London Irish Rifles), which he joined in August, 1914, and proceeded to France with them in February, 1915, taking part in all their engagements for 15 months, notably the battle of Loos, where the London Irish Kifles made a oonspicuous success in the charge. Lieut. Davies was educated at Bridgend Count School, apprenticed to Mr. Thomas Edwards, draper, Bridgend, and afterwards went to Messrs. Cook, Son and Co., wholesale drapers, London. For the last four months he resided at Keble College, Oxford, where he suc- cessfully passed his final military examination.

IGLYNOGWRI

I GLYNOGWR. I NATIONAL MISSION.—The National Mis- sion services of Repentance and Hope were held at Llandyfodwg Parish Church on Mon- day evening of last week, in English; on Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m., in Welsh; and in the evening at the Mission Church, Blackmill, in English, when the Rev. D. J. Arthur, B.A., Vicar of Pyle, delivered excellent addressee, both in English and Welsh, to fairly good con- gregations, considering the inclemency of the weather. The Vicar conducted the services at the Parish Church, and the lay reader (Mr. R. Radcliffe), at All Saints' Mission Church.

Advertising

j Women Workers' Series-No. 6. As warm as Toast- f F IKE the hew work at the I?u? ??????????? -Li way ? Rather! I'm getting to know the time-table, and can answer all sorts of questions straight off. Then I think I can spot all the season ticket holders. They are so I pleased, and say "Good morning," because I know them. It is rather cold standing at the gates, and I used to feel it. Now when I get my bit of time off I always get a good hot cup t of Rowntree's Cocoa. It's delicious. ILt The smell of it is so appetising, and when I get back to the gates I don't mind how chilly it is, for after Elect Cocoa I feel as warm as toast. I a alp of Cocoa maA.ø4 a Sidcu&t u&to' a mæI

i LECTURE ON EDUCATIONAL RECONSTRUCTION

LECTURE ON EDUCATIONAL RECONSTRUCTION AT PONTYCYMMER. On Thursday night of last week there was a large attendance at the Ffaldau Institute, Pontycymmer, to hear an inspiring address on education by Miss Beatrice de Norman, Lon- don. Miss F. M. Thomas, headmistress of the Ffaldau Girls' School, Pontyoymmer, who pre- sided, said the teachers of Glamorgan would remember Miss de Norman as an organising inspector for the Glamorgan County Council, which post she had left to become one of H.M. Inspectors of Schools. Miss de Norman waa now devoting her whole time to pioneer work in education. Miss de Norman, who was well received, dealt critically with the present-day system of education, and showed how it reflected the "spirit of the age." It was too much directed to material ends, too individualistic, too much an equipment for competitive ad- vancement. It was, she said, to education that the nations must look for the solving of many of its problems and difficulties. The conflict in which the nations of Europe were now plunged was not an isolated phenomenon. In our own country and elsewhere the history of the past century had been largely that of internal strife. They were passing through the birth-throes of a new age, an age in which there would be the new note of brotherhood and co-operation, in which democracy would come into its own. The basic principle in all educational reconstruction should be that of brotherhood. (Applause.) It was not changes in school machinery and curricula that were needed, but a radical change of attitude. Our educational system needed to give a fuller individual consideration to the units of the nation, whereby each may realise his place and responsibility in the state. Miss de Norman pleaded for the raising of the age of leaving school, and the providing of vocational training of youth. The open road from the cradle to the university for every one who could with advantage follow it must be realised. Freedom must be secured to the child that he may express himself and learn self-control. Thus the form of educa- tion should be elastic and adaptable. The status of the teacher should be improved, not only pecuniarily, but socially. Large classes should disappear. The child should be self- disciplined rather than disciplined. And in that connection she would say that vital reli- gious teaching on broad and tolerant lines, free from sectarianism, was needed to pro- mote the unfolding of the the highest and best. (Applause.) The child must be led to realise the dignity of work-to see that, however humble the position he occupies, he is a part in the great plan of life, a citizen of the Empire, and of the world, and that he must oo-operate with others to right the wrong, and to help the weaker as his brother. What, asked the speaker, was going to happen, when the war ceasedy3 Were they go- ing to sink back into the old condition of things? If they wanted to make the world a better place to live in than it had been, they had to begin in the school with vital edu- cation, not mere instruction. (Applause.) They saw how the wrong type of education had been going on in Germany. If co-oper- ation and brotherhood permeated the whole of their educational system, a change would take place right through their social future. Let them be among the pioneers. (Applause.) At the close a hearty vote of thanks to the lecturer was proposed by Mr. Ebenezer James, and seconded by the Rev D. D. 'Evans, D.C.

Advertising

 :ë   _n'T1Ii ÇiELI!Io\TaD ? Tt?a C.S'LK'??

ISTRANDED SOLDIERS THE OGMORE RECEPTION COMMITTEE

STRANDED SOLDIERS & THE OGMORE RECEPTION COMMITTEE. To the Editor. Sir,—There are two items in your last issue which, if taken together, must cause some amusement for those who have the least spark of humour in their make-up. One is the ac- oount of the annual dinner of the Ogmore Re- ception Committee, admittedly held for the purpose of reviving the interest of its mem- bers and the other is the letter, over the sig- nature of William Bartlett, purporting to emanate from the same committee, and claim- ing all the laurels for the excellent bit of work that Bridgend friends have been doing for the last 12 months for the stranded soldiers and sailors of the valleys. Perhaps the first item accounts for the second, and for the unpardonable ignorance it reveals both of the needs of our stranded boys, and the work of the Bridgend Free Church Council to meet the same. Happily, the work is thoroughly understood in the Garw (where a flag day has already been held), at Cymmer, at Maes- teg (where a flag day is projected), and also in the Ogmore Valley, which the letter seeks to belie. But may I be permitted to say on behalf of our workers, that since December, 1915, about £70 has been expended on this work; that 215 has been spent on motor cars alone for the Ogmore, not to mention the share in the cost of food, etc.—say another 210. The Colliery Lodges have been our best supporters. We have already acknowledged their generosity—Ogmore Lodge, L5; Wynd- ham, 2 guineas; Ocean, 2 guineas; and Aber, 10s. 6d. But, as will be seen, there is room for this further effort of a flag day. Mr. Bartlett's letter gives the impression that for the last 27 months an Ogmore car has always been available for Ogmore boys. I have but to say that during the whole of the time we have been working at the station, only twice has an Ogmore private motor car served us, and not once are we aware of having the Motor Cycle Club's help. No Ogmore cars have been at the station when we have needed them; but perhaps this is accounted for by the fact that the ink on the Bridgend contract, so boldly announced, can scarcely be dry yet, seeing it was only signed a fortnight ago, and not at the outset of the war, as the letter pretends. Stranded men need to be met. They don't know about contracts or committees. You need to be on the spot, with a cheery word and a helping hand. That is what our Council is trying to do, and we are sure the friends who are arranging the flag day in Ogmore on this behalf will not be turned aside from their noble purpose hi the letter of Mr. Bartlett or any other member of the Reception Committee. There is mani- festly plenty of room for both efforts, but in the interests of truth, I have been compelled to trespass upon your valuable space, that honour may be done to whom honour is due. —With many thanks, Yours, etc., THOMAS DAVIES, President Bridgend Free Church Council.

r THE WEIGHT OF BREAD

r THE WEIGHT OF BREAD. I To th eEditor. Sir,—From your report of the discussion on the weight of bread in the Ogmore and Garw Council meeting last Tuesday, it appears that one of the Councillors stated that there was no such thing as standard weight for bread. If that is correct what constitutes a; loaf, and why do the Bakers' Associations in the various districts report at times that the price of the quartern loaf will be raised to such or such a price? What, in view of this report db they consider to be a loaf? Again, there are many towns where prosecutions take place when bakers have sold bread loaves of less than 21bs. or 41bs. weight. If there is no standard weight for bread why does this occur ? Under Weights and Measures" in the Dictionary, it will be noted that a quartern loaf is 41bs., which points to the fact that there is a standard weight. But perhaps the Coun- cillor who made the statement will be able to explain this point. I for one would very much like to know why in some districts bread is weighed, the weight being made up by the addition of a piece of bread if under the 21bs. or 41bs. per loaf. Why cannot this be done in the district under the Ogmore and Garw Coun- cil's supervision ?—Yours etc., Pontycymmer. C. S. PARRIS,

Advertising

AxJveMase in the Glamorgan Gazette." If you want, to Bell, buy or exchange; you cannoll. dobotber. i I