Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
Advertising

STARTLING NEWS! FURNISHING WILL SOON BE A GREAT LUXURY rnv House Furnisher will c

Peep3 at Porthcawl

Peep3 at Porthcawl; It By MARINER. I .r-rTT ) The sug ons I made in this column some -months a,) that inducements should be offered to holiday makers to come to Porth- ca.wl will, I have reason to think, be taken up by the town. Some time ago the first arri- vals from the other side of England were no- ticed, and since then there has been a gradual increase in numbers. Houses have been let to visitors from the other coast. Of course, wo must expect to suffer to some extent from the great convulsion. There will be fewer people able to take a- holiday, but more will be requiring it, and where there are people who could afford the time to take a holiday, there are hundreds more who will not be able to afford the money. Still, we hope, of course, that there will be hundreds who will be able to afford both time and money to take their usual summer holidays. If the cry for economy meant the absolute prohibi- tion of holidays, then the result would not be economy, but a great increase in bankruptcy in seaside resorts, and a consequent heavier burden upon the national resources. That by the way. Our great desire is to get people to Porth- cawi. It is the place where anyone who is out for it can get a complete change. Even those from other seaside resorts can come to Porth- cawl and benefit and experience delights they have never experienced in their home town. Excursions have been stopped, and, of course, that upsets things a bit. Yet we still have our daily visitors, if not in such large num- bers. It must be admitted that we are now feeling a loss of revenue through this cause. Last year at this time thousands flocked along our streets; to-day they number only hun- dreds. We are not down-hearted, though. In our boarding houses we are not feeling dull as they are in other place where soldiers are Dot quartered. There they miss the young men who. about this time of the year, made the boarding-house a jolly place to stay in. They have now, nearly all of them, joined the ranks of the Territorial Army. Their hilarity and jovial spirit has left the boarding- house a quieter and duller place, but here in Porthcawl we have had the soldier boys with us all through the usually dreary winter sea- son, and there has hardly been a dull moment since they first came. < They are leaving us'this week and we sin- cerely regret it. They have conducted them- selves like soldiers and men, but I will have more to say about them later. What con- cerns me here, and I am sure everyone is thinking about it, is what is to be done to prevent hardship resulting from the departure of the Bantams. The houses in the town will be emptied of their well-paid for guests and the summer has just commenced. This week I noticed highly coloured posters advertising the glories and advantages of Blackpool. It's coloura were vivid, though not in tune with the colours of Nature. But the poster caught the eye, and that is the aim of the poster artiist. The Railway Company has of lato done much to assist and advertise Porthcawl in this way-by exhibiting posters at railway t stations on its system; but there are towns that the Great Western Railway does not touch, and the Railway Company's scheme for advertising Porthcawl is not extended to all the towns that its system does touch. It is therefore a question of what can be done to reach those places. Guides are all very well in their way, but are only read by people in- not a good advertising medium. Something terested in that kind of literature. They are that will be seen and read by the masses is what Porthcawl wants to get out, and it would not be a difficult matter for negotiations to be t entered inro with billposters in the towns it is t- desired to reach for the posing of large, coloured posters and brightly worded adver- ¡l tisements could be inserted in the local papers in season. This would, I am sure, result in great benefit to the town, and bring it's name before people who have never heard of Porth- cawl. 

Peep3 at Porthcawl

(Contin.LMd trom Prenoua Colnmn). good luck, and may they still create finer re- cords of achievements of Welshmen in this greatest of all wars. < w Mr. J. P. Leat is arranging to give a con- cert to the 3rd Welsh at Danygraig, and a concert party from Cardie, under Mr. Charles Oswal, has been engaged, Rnd smokes will be provided. All Saints Temperance Class has done a big tning in winning the shield in the temperance examination. Last- year All Saints and New- ton combined, and won the shield, but the classes entered separately this year with the mentioned result. w Porthcawl suffered from the storm on Sun- day nearly as much as any other place. For about ten minutes after the great deluge New Road was almost impassable. It was not long, however, before the water was carried off, and it was gratifying to notice an almost entire absence of those needs which were a bane to the inhabitants of New Road and surround- ing neigbourhood a year or two ago. A query: What became of the gas on Sun- day night ?

BANTAMS INSPECTED I

BANTAMS INSPECTED. I 12th SERVtCE BATTAUON WAMT TO GO I TOBERUN. Major-General Sir Ivor Herbert, Bart., M.P., Lord Lieutenant of Momouthshire, on Saturday afternoon inspected the 12th (Service) Bat- talion, South Wales Borderers (3rd Gwent). There was a large attendance which included a large number of ladies. The men, all of whom are under aft. Sin. in height, with the exception of the ofncers, were very smart in appearance. The Lord Lieutenant made an inspection of the various drill grounds during the morning and saw the battalions at work. Headed by the band, under Band-Sergeant H. Parker, the men subsequently marched to the parade ground, where they were drawn up in mass fac- ing the grand stand. Lieutenant Colonel A. E. Pope was in com- mand of the men, and other officers on parade were Lieutenant and Adjutant C D. Phillips, Second- Lieutenants C. E. HoSmeister, W. C. Phillips. W. E. G. How ell, W. J. Proctor, H. S. Edmonds (A Company); Lieutenant B. F. Murphy, Second-Lieutenants W. E. Brown, T. 0. Jones, R. Duckham, and B. C. Bevan (B Company). Lieutenant II. C. Rees, Second- Lieutenants J. S. Lewis, J. R. Symes, H. R. Taylor, and D. R. Williams (C Company); Second-Lieutenants J. W. Foreman and H. E. Brighton (D. Company); Lieutenant and Quar- termaster J. Allbutt, Regimental-Sergeant- Major H. J. Vatcher, Company-Sergeant-Majors W. Parker, W. Codlin, T. Devonport, and T. Alfjrd. The Lord Lieutenant, who was accompanied by his Staff, Colonel Thursby Dauncey (omcer commanding the Western Country Depot, New- pajtt), and Sec.-Lieut. W. Welford, who acted as oruerly onicer, received a rousing reception. After inspecting the battalion, he paid a tribute to the soldierly and smart appearance of the men, laying special emphasis on the need for moral as well as physical culture. Subsequently, the battalion marched past the Lord Lieutenant. In the evening the men were entertained, when Mr. W. J. Orders, D.L., presided. Major General Sir Ivor Herbert, in an address, said that Colonel Pope had received a message that the 12th (Gwent) Battalion the South Wales Borderers, would very probably be removed to other quarters. They had a splendid command- ing officer in Colonel Pope, and, after what he had seen that day, he could, after his forty years' experience in the Army, tell Colonel Pope that the 12th Gwents would make a mark for themselves, He also desired to thank Mr. W. J. Orders for all the work which he and those who assisted him had done. They had also to thank Colcnel Dauncey and his men for their services. The 12th Gwents would go away possibly next week—certainly before many days. They would go to-where should he say? (Cries of "Ber- lin.") If they wanted to go to Berlin they could go there. Everything depended on their having the will and determination to do so. There were V.C.'s still to be won, and they should remember that the South Wales Bor- derers had a good record for V.C.'s.

PORTHCAWL CONFECTIONERI

PORTHCAWL CONFECTIONER AND THE SHOP ACT. At Bridgend Police Court en Saturday, William Frank, confectioner, John Street, was summoned for having employed an assistant after 1-30 on the afternoon that the notice stated was the assistants half holiday. Rhys Williams, County Shop Inspector, said at 2-30 p.m. on Friday, 20th May, he visited defendants shop at Porthcawt. On reading the assistants notice he found two assistants were employed. He found out that one of the assistants was working that day contrary to the statement in the notice, which said that the assistants half holiday was to be taken on Friday. The Cardiff manageress said the assistant took her half holiday on Tuesday. The case was dismissed on payment of costs.

PORTHCAWL I

PORTHCAWL. I RECEIVING ORDER.—Cameron Jeffs, now of Ccldra, Porthcawl, formerly 10, Milli- cent Street, CardiS, wholesale margarine, butter and cheese importer and distributor. FREEHOLDS.—In connection with the sale by Messrs. Michael Davies and Co., at Porthcawl on June 30th, the properties Bay View and Greencroit were sold to Mr. Lang- don, Porthcawl, for .61,775.

Advertising

?TheWelshman'tFavoante. iMABON Sauce ?f?' ??OoJ

THANKS TO PORTHCWL THANS TO PORTHCAWL I

THANKS TO PORTHC&WL. THANS TO .PORTHCAWL. I OFPtCERS' APPRECIATION OF THE I AMBULANCE SENT TO THE FRONT. BY THE TOWN. I SERGT. MACK'S !NTEHEST!NG ETTER. The following letters have been received by 1 Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P., chairman of the Porthcawl Council, acknowledging the arrival of ambulances which have been subscribed for by townspeople, and sent out to the front:— Lieut.-Colonel A. G. Prothero, of the 2nd Battalion Welsh Regiment, writes:—"I am desirous of conveying the thanks of the Bat- talion to the townspeople of Portheawl and to the Urban District Council of the town for the handsome gift of two ambulance carri- ages. They are splendid presents, and they will, I am sure, be of the greatest use in alle- viating the sufferings of the wounded by the saving of time and labour in which they can be conveyed to the dressing station from the trenches." Captain A. Ridley Page, of the 2nd Batt. Welsh Regiment, R.A.M.C., says:—"It is my f pleasant duty to acknowledge the safe arrival of idle two Furber ambulance carriages for this regiment sent here by the U. D. Council and the townspeople of Porthcawl. I con- gratulate Porthcawi for leading the way and on being the first town to present these am- bulance carriages, and this regiment on its luck in being the first battalion to receive them. I have been here at the front and have had cause to feel the urgent need of these carriages, so thalI am very pleased now to have them. I might mention that they have already commenced their good work. Yesterday, Lieut. F. J. A. Dibden (who was recently awarded a Military Cross) was un- fortunately wounded when walking along a communication trench, but, thanks to one of these ambulance carriages, he had been dressed at the Regiment Aid Post, and was on the motor ambulance on his way bac* to hos- pital within a quarter of an hour from the time he received his wound. When there is severe fighting it is quit.e Impossible for motor ambulances to come up to the Regimental Aid Posts by day, and it is then that the Furber ambulance is invaluable. I can assure you our stretcher-bearers are very pleased with them, and would like to join me in thanking you for lightening their task, which is by no means a light one. Many a wounded man will have cause to thank Porthcawl for its generosity in providing the carriages." FIRED OX AMBULANCE MEN. An extremely interesting letter of thanks has also been received from Sergt. Mack, of the 2nd Welsh. He says: Gratitude prompts me to write thanking the inventor. Porthcawl U.D. Council, and the townspeople of Porthcawl for the presentation of the am- bulances. I write on behalf of the regimen- tal stretcher-bearers who work with myself. We realise the great boon conferred upon us. Looking back we plainly see what a priceless gift the carriages would have been during our sojourn in the battle areas where the regi- ment has fought. I can recall a number of incidents where they would have saved men who were not stretcher-bearers, but who im- provised stretchers out of barn doors, ladders, etc. These ambulances would have provided faster means of conveyance from the bring line to the held ambulances. It took too long a time for the regimental bearers to take one wounded man away, and return for an- other, and in some cases patients could not be moved from the stretcher. The motor ambulance too could only approach tht Regi- mental First Aid Posts under cover of dark- ness, and it was found to be the best policy to wait till then before getting the wounded from the trenches. Given a Furber ambu- lance, we sixteen stretcher-bearers can keep working with ease. Providence has favoured us. Before we got the ambulance the stret- cher-bearers had exhausting tasks. They had to carry men until they felt they could go no further. Now their task is made easy, and the work of first aid is made more elec- tive. Whatever dimculties arise it is our business to get over them, and before the company settled into trench warfare each open battle meant many a long trudge with the heaving, crunching stretcher carried by four men. The stretcher drills of peace- ful memories were excellent for the parade ground, but not for the battlefield of the Aisne and Flanders. October 24th, 1914, will be remembered by us stretcher bearers of the Welsh Regiment. The French had passed beyond the firing line held by the Brit- ish troops, and we stretcher-bearers searched the ground which originally laid between our lines and the Germans. Several men and a Captain of the South Wales Borderers were found and brought in. Meanwhile our bri- gade had left ————, and we found ourselves isolated. The Captain had sunered fearful agony from exposure, and our medical omcer gave orders for his removal. With our heavy valises we took turns carrying Captain Barry for a distance of over four miles. It seemed as if we were never going to get clear of the screaming shells and bullets. It was slow going; tottering walls of the burning houses of ———— threatened to engulf us as we trudged by. The sweat simply streamed from us. What a great aid the Furber am- bulance would have been then. On another occasion we would have laughed to scorn the German attempt to shell us by the speed with which we could have moved with one of these ambulances. Thinking the enemy would play the game. I ordered the stretchers to be opened out—in a manner that would give the Germans no cause to make any mistake that we were any other than stretcher- bearers. A perfect storm of lead greeted us ripping one of our stretchers. There was no time to lose, and several of us crawled to- wards our front line where an omcer had been bombed. We got that omcer away. There were no barricades then. It meant just a cool contempt of the enemy's shells, and there were those who calmly walked along at the same old pace, making a joke of the whole a,ffair. Given these carriages, they could have run the guantlet crying game the whole way with the foenot 200 yards away. The time may yet come when the carriages will prove their value. They have already given to us brighter prospects for the future."

A PERFECT WASTER I

A PERFECT WASTER." I KENFtG HtLL COLDER SENTENCED. I THEFT AT TONDU. I At Bridgend Police Court on Monday, David Wilkins (24), a collier, of Kenng Hill, was charged with having stolen a 9-carat gold bracelet and a gold chain necklet, valued at .64 9- the properly of Annie Hopkins, from the L!yu6 Arms Hotel, Tondu. David Hopkins, son of the licensee of the Llyn& Arms Hotel, Tondu, said he was upstairs in the sitting-room about 4.30 on Saturday, and heard someone opening the drawers, etc., in the bedroom near. He took little notice, as he thought his sister was there. Presently some- ojie came to the door of the sitting room, and on looking up he saw the prisoner. He asked him what he wanted there, and he made a dash for the passage. Witness followed him, but lost sight of him. Later he saw the prisoner jump over the wall at the back of the premises. He gave chase and found the prisoner hiding in a Bold. Witness told him he wanted him to accompany him back to the house. He aimed a blow at witness, but missed, and witness gave him one back, and then held him until the police came. Annie Hopkins, daughter of the licensee of the LIyn6 Arms Hotel, said she saw a man climb- ing over the wall on the day in question, but she did not know him. In consequence of some- thing that had been said. she went up to her bedroom, and there found that the bangle and necklet had gone. They had been placed in a trinket vase on the dressing table. The drawers were all opened, and the contents were scattered about. She valued the goods at jS4 9s. P.C. 119 said at 5 p.m. on Saturday last, in consequence of information received, he saw the prisoner in a neld being held by the first witness. He there searched him, and found in his possession the two articles produced. He afterwards conveyed him to the Police Station, where he was charged. The Chairman: Had the man been drinking? Witness He had had some drink, but he was not drunk. Prisoner pleaded guilty to the charge. Another charge was then preferred against the prisoner of having stolen from a bedroom at the same time and place, the sum of 4s. 6d. Emily Pritchard, a domestic in the employ of Mrs. Hopkins, Llynfi Arms, said she placed 4s. 6d., together with a farthing, in a purse, which she put into a tin box. The box was not locked, but the money was put beneath other things. In consequence of something being said she went up to the bedroom, and found the purse was left, but the money had gone. P.C. 119 gave evidence that at 5 p.m. on Satur- day, when he arrested the prisoner on another charge, he found the money, 4s. 6d., in his waist- coat pocket. When charged he said, HI don't know what I did altogether; it is too late now," Prisoner said he would not have been there but for a friend. He got drunk, and he did not know what he was doing. There were previous convicticns recorded against him. Inspector Rees Davies said this man had been an absentee and had got away from the escort, and he was also discharged from the Army. He was a. perfect waster. Prisoner was sentenced to two months impri- sonment in the first case, and one month to follow that on the second charge.

KISSED THEIR OFFICER I

KISSED THEIR OFFICER. I HOWPA!NWAS BORNE. I In the first of a series of articles in the Daily Chronicle," describing the life In a London miliiary hospital, Mr. Harold Begbie relates the following:— I will tell you a very beautiful story which I heard this morning from a great surgeon going his rounds of the hospital. It is a story which helps one to understand the British soldier. A certain omcer who had taken part in the storming of Hill 60, and who lay for 13 hours on the ground grievously wounded, was brought eventually to this London hospital, and was visited by my friend the surgeon. The surgeon asked him, "How did you feel, now, lying there unattended for 13 hours?" The omcer replied, "I'm ashamed to tell you. I behaved very badly. I groaned for hours." Then his eyes shone, and he said, "I felt so ashamed that I apologised to the wounded Tommies near enough to hear me. And do you know what they said to me ? They said 'You go on groaning, sir; it eases you; never mind us; you were not brought up hard as we were we know that; it's easier for us to bear pain than what it is for you.' And that wasn't all. Do you know some of those splen- did fellows crawled up to me in the darkness on their hands and knees, in spite of their wounds, they did really, and-well, they kissed me." The surgeon looked at me as he nnished. "How tender brave men are!" he said gently, and added, "You remember, Nelson asked Hardy to kiss him."

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SCENE I

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SCENE I AT PORTHCAWL. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Albert Holloway, Richard Gwilym, and Hopkin Smith, of Rhydfelin, were summoned for having been drunk and disorderly on Locks Common, Porthcawl, on Sunday. P.S. Grimths said the defendants came on to the Common and behaved in a disorderly man- ner. The Military Band was playing, and de- fendants caused a disturbance by throwing chairs about. Some soldiers got hold of them, and rushed them towards the beach. When witness took them into custody they were abu- sive and violent. One of the defendants: Was I not carried away, with my legs in the air?—I can't say; one of you was. P.C. Stockford said the men were very vio- lent all the way to the Police Station. They used filthy language. P.C. Ingrain said Holloway had a war medal, and when he was brought to the station he threw it down, and said, H Here's the medal; I won't do any more work for the country." Defendants were each fined J61.

MINERS LEADERS IN LONDON I

MINERS LEADERS IN LONDON WAtTtNG FOR THE BOARD OF TRADE. Xo conclusion has yet been reached in the negotiations proceeding in London for a new agreement reguiadng wages and conditions in the South Wales coalfield. The South Wales Miners' Executive and a committee of the South Wr.les Coalowners' Association again met separately on Tuesday, buu no intimation was received up to lunch time of any further conference with Mr. Run- ciman (President of the Board of Trade). Mr. Isaac Mitchell, of the Industrial Com- missioners' Department, however, saw Mr. Tom Richards, M.P., and Mr. Alfred Onions, secretary and treasurer of the South Wales Miners' Federation, in reference, it is under- stood, to the written interpretation sent in as to the men's outstanding demands. So far as the owners are concerned, it is understood that, while waiting to hear from the President of the Board of Trade, the com- mittee is preparing information upoti points in the Conciliation BoE'.rd agreement which will tend to bear out their case in the event of conferences being held to frame a new agreement on the lines of Mr: Runciman's proposals tentatively acepted by the men at last Wednesday's Cardiff conference. Both owners' and men's representatives met again separately in the afternoon, but their proceedings were of short duration. In view of the fact that a definite reply had not been received from the President of the Board of Trade, the Executive Council of the Federa- tion decided to adjourn until this morning. It was stated that Mr. Runciman was so pressed with other matters that he did not anticipate being able to give them a reply until Thursday. Although, up to a late hour last night; Mr. Tom Richards, M.P.j had received no com- munication from Mr. Runciman, there was a general impression among members of the Executive Council of the South Wales Miners' Federation that to-day they would be in a position to discuss the observations of the President of the Board of Trade upon the interpretation the men's representatives had put upon the terms of the new wage agree- ment. However, nothing definite could be reported last night. COALOWNERS RETURN HOME. The representative of the Coalowners' Association of South Wales and Monmouth- shire, meeting in London yesterday, received no communication from Mr. Runcim-an as to his proposals, but an intimation came to hand to the effect that he did not wish to see the coalowners in conference again at present. The eoalowners' representatives who had been called by telegram to London on Sun day, therefore left for their homes last night. They say they knew nothing whatever as to what is going on between Mr. Runciman and the men's representatives, and they feel very strongly upon the matter.

HOUSE RENT

HOUSE RENT. A report was received at Thursday's meet- ing of the Neath Town Council with reference to rents of certain houses owned by the Cor- poration under the Workmen's Dwellings' Scheme. I Councillor J. R. Jones hoped that no impe- tus would he given M) outside bloodsuckers to raise the rents of the houses they owned. Councillor W. B. Trick (hotly): That term is quite uncalled for. If a man lays out money on house property he is certainly entitled to a return for his money. The remark made use of by Councillor Jones is most ungentlemanly and is tantamount to a reflection upon every man who owns a house. The Mayor: I'm sure Councillor Jones will withdraw his observation. Councillor Jones withdrew the remark, but again expressed the hope that the. rents would not be raised, especially at such a time as the present, when everything was going up. It being stated that there was no intention of raising rents the matter end.

PORRtDGE ADVOCATED

PORRtDGE ADVOCATED. Merthyr Education Committee, on the proposi- tion of Mr. D. W. Jones, discussed the advisabil- ity of introducing into the schools in the borough a system of instruction in thrift. Now was the opportunity, said Mr. Jones, to incul- cate thrift among the scholars. "There is a very good chance that the next generation will be much more thrifty and careful than we have been in the past," he said. Councillor Marsh seconded. Mr. Jones said his definition of thrift was the avoidance of all extravagances and waste, and live the simple life. '")fr. Francis: I live on porridge mostly. He thought that to ask people to transfer Post Office savings to the Government Loan—a jump from 2l to H p<*r cent.—was nothing less than exploitation. The principle of the proposition was carrie 1.

SENTtMENTAL TOSH I

SENTtMENTAL TOSH. I The General Federation of Trade Unions, sit- ting at Derby, on Friday discussed the question of internationalisation raised in the annual re- port. Mr. Bramley, of the Furnishing Trades, com- plained of the meagreness of the reference. He declined to believe that the brutalities of the German military authorities were a fair reflex of the character and temperament of the Ger- man working classes, and he moved that that paragraph be referred back. Mr. Appleton, secretary, said he was in Ger- many in June of last year, and it was obvious to him that war preparations even then evidently had the sympathy of the German people. Mr. Ben Tillett said Fancy asking two pugil- ists to kiss each other when they were scrap- ping. He declared, from personal knowledge, that German Trade Unionists were in favour of this war. It was not the time, while men und nations were in full conflict, to utter sentimental tosh. After the war was time enough for that. The next business was proceeded with amidst cheers.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every claaa of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. I

RUSSIANS WILL COME AGAINI

RUSSIANS WILL COME AGAIN. I MILITARY CR:T)C'S CONFtDENCE tN I THES!TUATtON. Colonel Maude, C.B., the military critic of "The Sunday Times," expresses the utmost couiidenee in the Russians "to come again" As I have pointed out before, the struggle now lies between Russian mobility and Ger- man nre-power. The latter have acquired this power to an abnormal degree at the cost of sacrineing mobility, and the problem for the Russians from the first has been to adopt measures which would compel their enemy to hamper himself with this nre-power, in siege- guns, and all their supplies and appurtenances and thus prevent him from utilising his own capacity for rapid movement, which his ar- mies, as neld-troops, undoubtedly possess, in as high a degree as to the Russians. Now, quite apart from the fact thab the German infantry can no longer be trusted to carry neld entrenchments without greater nre- support than neld artillery by itself can give, the Ru-sians still posses and have time to im- provise works of such solidiry, in the way of ditches and parapets, that neld artillery alone can make no impression on them, or only at the cost of a greater expenditure of ammuni- tion, measured in weighty than siege guns would use for the same task. Hence it is im- possible for the Germans to rid themselves of their incubus or attempt to defeat their an- tagonists by rapid marching concentrations, which were in fact the essential foundation of all their strategical concepts until the collapse of their invasion of France. The German staff will presently be in this dilemma-whether to follow their present opponents further east, with a doubtful Roumania on their southern flank-or move northwards against the great Warsaw group, trusting to find sup- port from the attacks which such troops as are still threatening that place can make against it. In neither case could the advantage ob- tained be more than ephemeral, for the Rus- sian armies are accumulating, while those of the Germans are melting at an almost unpre- cedented rate. Ultimately the Germans will find themselves outnumbered on both lines, and from all the indications I can gather I do not think they will have long to wait. Then, with numbers and mobility on their side, the Russian staS will have all the elements at hand for another Beresina, or even a Sedan on the very grandest scale.

A CRY FOR VENGEANCE I

A CRY FOR VENGEANCE. BRtTJSH TRADE UN!ON)STS' REPLY TO I GERMAN LEADERS. The annual conference of the Federation of Trade Unions was, opened in the Temperance Hall, Derby, on Friday. Mr. James O'Grady, M.P., London Furnishing Trades (chairman), presided; supported among others by Mr. Ivor H. Gwynne, Swansea (Tin and Sheet Millmen), and delegates of Trade Unions with a member- ship of 1,086,391 were present. Mr. Appleton (secretary) presented an inter- esting correspondence relating to the Interna- tional Secretariat, the headquarters of which have been in Berlin. This correspondence re- vealed that Mr. C. Legien (the German secre. tary) has within the past few weeks been en. deavouring to arrange an International Trades Congress to be held at Amsterdam. The over. tures to British Trade Unionists were made through the Dutch branch by Mr. J. Oude- grest, secretary in Holland. In a reply to this invitation, writing on the 10th of May, Mr. Appleton says:- Legien is not in a position to appreciate the bitternpss which has been engendered in Great Britain, and I think in France also, by Germany's utter disregard of the Hague Con- vention and the usages !of civilised warfare. Poisoned wells, poisoned trenches, and the in- famous murder of helpless non-combatants have created a new spirit. Hitherto our people have treated war as they treat the higher forms of sport, and they have endeav- oured to observe those amenities which even war demands from honourable men, but to- day there is a cry for vengeance. To-day the papers are publishing photographs of the little babies who were drowned as a conse- quence of the attack of the Germans upon the unarmed Lusitania. Even if any representative was willing to in- cur the risks it would be useless to ask our people to agree to a conference. It may be possible in Germany and the Scandinavian countries to do these- things, but in Britain and in France there is, in fact, democratic control, and to attend any conference at the present moment would be to outrage the feel- ings of a people who are overwhelmed, not only with horror, but with a determination to punish. The Management Committee, in their report for the year, state the question of demobilisa- tion and the effect it would have upon the lab- our market has engaged the serious attention of the Management Committee. When the war was over there would be, or at least they hoped there would be, hundreds of thousands of sol- dier workmen seeking employment at old or new occupations. Many of these were Trade Unionists. It was said that in the 10th Welsh Battalion the percentage of Trade Unionists was 95. Mr. O'Grady, M.P., in his inaugural address, said three-quarters of a million of Trade Union- ists were serving with the British Army. Their enlistment had been for the period of the war, and when the war was over the Federation were anxious that the Government should take care that there was no undue discharge of large bodies of men to flood the labour market. As to the Munitions Bill, he strongly defended the action of those Trade Unions who had vol- untarily agreed to come under its provisions, and prophesied that it would enormously im- prove the status of organised labour in this country. It was decided to invest at least £20,000 in the War Loan. Mr. J. Hill, Newcastle-on-Tyne Boilermakers, mentioned that his Union had decided to invest X50,000 in the War Loan and to convert their old War Stock, so that they would have a total holding of £80,000.

Advertising

LADIES, READ THIS. I ADVICE FREE toi Stamp. Mre. R. A Stewart's Famous Female Remedy ne. I Fails.-Addnm: 9. Gaime* Street, BrMtol. 4aat

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. 1 1 4k A rl A l l Ir I T j v l AV, A r- Ar A P Ir 11 M, Irk Ir IF. -r I T 1 1 'I T Ir Ir I Lead the Simple Life. .I "What is necessary is not a mere trimming of surplus expenditure, but a. revolutionising of class and personal standards of consumption during the period of the war," says the "Nation." "How far even the House of Commons is from realising the meaning of Mr. McKenna's requirements was illustrated last Tuesday when it greeted with 'laughter' the absolutely true suggestion by Sir Joseph Wal- ton that 'the nation should turn its attention to the necessity of leading the simple life.' Foi unless this lesson is learnt voluntarily, it will have to be taught in the much ruder fashion of heavy taxation and forced lending." G.W.R. Emptoyees and the War Loan. The Great Central and the Great Western Railway Companies have made arrangements to facilitate subscriptions by their employees to the New 41, per Cent. War Loan and thus enable the smallest investor to acquire this Government Stock upon exactly the same terms as the capitalist. Upon the subscrip- tions reaching five pounds, or multiples of nve pounds, the sum can be converted into War Loan Stock and the necessary stock cer- tincate will then be issued. This effort on the part of these two railway companies to encourage thrift is very interesting, especi- ally when it is borne in mind the number of trained men who have already been released for active service. ? Li)te in Dancer. the significance of General Jonre's batter- ing ram Is candidly admitted by Mr. Karl von Wiegand, the special correspondent of the "New York Herald" with the German forces. He says:—"I wish that those who cause and make war with indifference could be put in the hell between Neuville and the Lorette heights for a little while. Between the Labyrinth, Neuville, and the Lorette heigths the deeds of valuer on both sides would fill a library. From my lofty observa- tion post it is easy even for a civilian to un- derstand why. the French selected this par- ticular spot for the attempt to break through the German lines, and why the Ger- mans are grimly endeavouring to stop them at all cost. The next defensive line is a long way to the rear. If the French gain all the hills their artillery can sweep the plains ahead with such success that it will mean the prob- able loss of Lille and possibly the rolling up of the whole German line." Board at Trade. anting of Mr; RUheiman a.& President of the Board of Trade, and of Captain Pretyman as his Under-Seeretai-y, a writer in the "Fortnightly Review" says:—"Capt. Prety- man takes a plodding, methodical mind and querulous voice to the Board of Trade as junior to Mr. Runciman, and many would like to know what the President said when he heard the name of his new Under-Secretary. A more ill-matched pair of yoke-fellows could hardly have been brought together. Mr. Runciman is one of the best Presidents of the Board of Trade which that Department has had for many years. But while he is a. north- country Nonconformist Radical to the back- bone, Captain Pretyman is the heir direct of the Anglican divine whom Pitt made a Bishop because he had been his tutor at Cambridge. Mr. Runciman is a managing director incar- nate. Captain Pretyman's idea. of property is property in land. Mr. Runciman is Presi- dent of the Young Liberal League; Captain Pretyman is the founder of the Land Union. and day and night he puts up a prayer that not he but the land taxes mav be confoun- ded. t Mr. Redmond and the Coalition. Mr. John Redmond, M.P., speaking at a banquet in Dublin to the Irish-Australian priests, referred to Home Rule and the Coali- tion Government. He said nothing that had recently happened had jeopardised the certain coming into operation of the Home Rule Act as soon as the war was over. There were some people foolish enough to think, and malicious enough to say, the Coalition Government meant the end of the Home Rule Act. In his opinion a more monstrous, false, and cow- ardly statement was never made. He did not like a Coalition Government, and never really understood why it was necessary to form it. He showed his distrust by refusing to join it. but it was a Government formed for war and war only, and came to an end when the war was over. The Home Rule Act would come into operation at the end of war. Nothing fould prevent that, unless during the war the Coalition Government passed a Bill to repeal the Home Rule Act. That would, indeed, put an end to the political truce. The Coalition Government existed only from day to day by agreement, and if any such insane proposal were put forward the Coalition Government would not live for a week. Not Bluffing. "Mr. Bryan has issued a curious statement. and, incidentally, has disclosed what has here- tofore been hinted at—that Germany and Austria were led to believe by Mr Bryan that the President's 'strict accountability' Note to Germany was intended for home consumption. and need not be taken too seriously by the Teutonic Allies." says the "Morning Post" Washington correspondent. "Mr. Bryan says that after the Note was sent to Germany he had a. conversation with Dr. Dumba. the Aus- trian Ambassador, and later learned that 'the conversation had been misinterpreted in Ber- lin.' Dr. Dumba's attention was called to the matte!) p.nd he telegraphed his Government denying the construction that had been put upon Mr. Bryan's statement. Mr. Bryan does not say what he told Dr. Dumba, or how It was possible for the Ambassador to put an entirely wrong construction on his words, but it is evident that Germany fully credited Dr. Dumba's version of the conversation, and in consequence totally'failed to realise that the Washington Government was in earnest and not Indulging in bluff. It was because of the wrong impression created in Berlin that Count Bernstorff h".d to send Herr Meyer-Gerhard to explain to the German Government that Dr. Wilson meant all he said In his communi- cation and that no weight should be attached to Mn Bryan's opposing utterances." Trade Union Regulations. "The statutory suspension of all Trade- Union regulations during the war may be in- evitable, but their restoration at its close' ought to be secured explicitly by statute in the same way as the suspension," says the' "New Statesman." Conquest. Napoleon said. (Conquest made me what I am, and conquest must maintain me.' Con- quest has made us what we are, and we are too apt to forget that conquest must main- tain us." says the "British Weekly." "The passion for e-ase and comfort and the continu- ance of things as they are has grown so- strong among the prosperous of our nation that it is distinctively angry when anything interferes with it." Bound for Swansea. Lloyd's Bordeaux agent telegraphs :—The- Spanish steamer Juan reports that on July 2nd she &aw the French schooner HirondeIIe, from La RocheIIe for Swansea, with pitwood, sustain gunfire 40 miles north of Ushant andi picked up the crew of seven men and captain of the schooner, which was struck by six shells and capsized after eight minutes with- out sinking. The wreck is still noating. The crew were landed at Pauillae on Sunday. Landfcrd and AHens. Thomas Rees, licensee of the Star Hotel, Wind-street, Swansea, summoned for failing; to give notice of the presence of three aliens; staying at his house, and for failing to enter particulars of four aliens who had stayed at his house on the register, was hned t5 in the first case, the second being withdrawn. Mr. W. A. Thomas, who defended, said the men; left early in the morning without breakfast,, and therefore defendant could not nil in their destination. Church Betis for Cannon. The Austrian Press is loud in its praises of the spirit of saerince manifested by num- erous provinces, and especially by the TyroE in devoting their church belts to war uses, says the "Chronicle." "Judging by the re- ports in the Neue Frele Presse,' these gifts-. of bells are on a very large scale, and in aIL parts of the country the clergy are enthusias- tic in their desire to devote all superfluous bells, or those which strike a false note, or those whose voice is not in perfect harmony with the other bells of the set, to the War Materials Department. In no part of the world, we are told, are the bells sweeter than in the valleys and on the hill-sides of the. Tyrol, nowhere are people more attached to, their solemn music, but, 'says the 'Neue Freie Presse/ when it is the duty of all to keep. back the enemy from their beautiful land. and from desecrating their beloved churches.. no i-acrince can be too great. The Vienna newspaper concludes: 'If we are victorious we shall receive back the metal for our bells, and the metal which we are now devoting to thunder, death and destruction on our ene- mies will once more sound in love and peace from our church towers.' Preaching at Leamington the Bishop oi Worcester said that some years ago-with that limited vision which sometimes seemed to be the measure of philanthropists—a good deal was said about the advantage of dimin- ishing the birth-rate. Those who taught that infamous doctrine led young men and women into pracT-ices for the prevention of birth; which had been one of the greatest curses of. the country. It was easier to suggest such habits than to cure them, and it was dimcuit in the extreme to get back into the clean ways of married life which existed before that disreputable doctrine was preached. To-day with our terrible mortality among marriage- able men, the question of the future supply of children would be very grave indeed. It was a national necessity that men and women. of every class should be brought back to re- cognise the glory of the thing which nature indicated—the gkn'y to married people of large families, and the shame, as well as the physical evils, of measures which prevented it. He wished It were possible, and perhaps it would be possible now, before it was too late, for the State, while leaving to the parent) all the valuable supervision and education of children which was the parents' privilege and duty-to put forward tangible advantages of maintenance for those who gave to the State- the advantage of an increasing population. I The National Register. In vain is it pointed out that compulsory service cannot be imposed by the Government without an Act of Parliament nrst obtained says the "Daily Telegraph," concerning the; debate in the House of Commons on Monday. At once the shriek of "Conscription!" is; raised, and when anyone Inquires what sense there is in raising it, the triumphant reply is made that those who favour compulsory ser- vice also favour this Bill. which, therefore, must be, in spite of its plain text, a conscrip- tioni&t measure. There is really no reasoning wl-zh crazy apprehensiveness of this sort. Those who do not suSer from it will gather from Mr. Long's speech of yesterday, as from what has been said before, that the Govern- ment are attempting a very big thing, and are looking a long way ahead—as we believe and hope,beyond the end of the war, the con- clusion of which will be far indeed from seeing us at) the end of our need for measures of national salvation. They will understand that any effect the registration of voluntary ser- vice may have in adding to the numbers of our Armies is only a small part of the result for which the authors of thN Bill are hoping that the general aim is to render possible the appli- cation of new forces of labour in all those direcTicns in which it is, or may be, most. urgently required. That does not mean only the making of arms and munitions and mili- tary supplies in general. It means, as Mr. Long mude quite clear, the maintenance of our export trade as a pillar of that finance which is indispensable to the cause of tho Alhes. It means providing for the needs of an agneuitural situation which is already serious, and which may, if cur home food production cannot he greatly increased, bring this country to such a pass as few men living in It have ever imagined. If anything that this Government can do to further the necessary reorganisation of cur resources should remain undone they will have betrayed their country. They are not likely, we think, to forget that in the desire to calm the troubled spirit of Sir Thomas Whittaker.