Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
17 articles on this page
WENAR POLITICS

WEN-AR POLITICS. Series of Conservative Meetings. On Monday evening a series of open-air meetings, which will be continued during the remainder of this and next week, was began under the auspices of the Breconsbire Con- servative and Unionist Association. The meetings had been organised by Mr T. Mannd (the County Agent). VELINFACH. A BucoeBsful meeting was held on Monday at Velinfach, there being a good and represent. ative attendanoe, despite the demands of the bay harvest. The Chair was occupied by Alderman A. A. Mitchell, J.P., Olyn Celyn, and he was sup- ported by Mr H. S. Neale, of the Union Defence League, and Mrs Mitchell. In his opening remarks the Chairman said the meeting, in conjunction with a series of other meetings in conneoion with the Con- servative Association of the County, was arranged as a counter-blast against the detest- able policy of the present Government, and bad also the object of supporting the candidature of Mr Conway Lloyd. Their opponents said that both the Home Rule question and the Welsh Church question were settled, but be thought that in view of numerous happenings in the House of Commons and in Ulster, Home Rule was still a burning question, whilst the petitions signed by Welsh Nonconformists against the Church Bill spoke for themselves. In conclusion, he appealed to the electors to Vote for Mr Conway Lloyd at the next election, and then uphold the policy of the Conservative Party, which policy he believed to be sound. (Applanse). Mr H. S. Neale, who was well received, delivered a most inspiring address, which he devoted. entirely to the Home Rale question. lIe said the present Government had used every iffort possible to escape a general elect- ion, but before very long the people of this Country would have an opportunity of declaring their mind at the polls. For the first time for Centuries this country was threatened with civil war, and that was due entirely to the instable policy of the Government. Mr Birrell stated on assuming office that Ireland was never in a more peacefol and tranquil state. That, ■the speaker thought, was & good testimony for the Conservative Party but as the resolt of Radical legislation Ireland was now in a tur- moil, and the population thrown into two hostile camps. Proceeding, Mr Neale referred to the plot engineered by some members of the Cabinet early in the year to coerce Ulster, and he compared trained Ulster Volunteers to the Nondescript Nationalist Volunteers, and com- pared the spirit of loyalty which led to the formation of the Ulster Volunteers with the spirit of disloyalty to the Flag and Crown J*bioh characterised tbe National Volunteers. There bad been three Home Role Bills intro- duced, continued Mr Neale, and the present one was the worst of the lot. Under the Present Bill Ireland would not be a self- country, as tbe ratepayers of ^Qgland, Scotland, and Wales wonld have to Pay a million and a half to make up the loss 1tbicb would be incurred in carrying on the government of the country. And with the Provision for labourers' cottages, the comple- &Ion of the land purchase system, and the National Insurance Act, the payments that 1tonld come from Englishmen, Welshmen, and Scotchmen would represent something like 6J 2 Illion pounds. The Loyalists of Ulster baa en true to their trust, but under Home Rule Slither their prosperity, political liberty, or tbe >'otestant religion would be safe (Hear, bear). conclusion he asked them to stand by the l*Ople of Ulster in the present crisis, so tbat K&land sboald not be cot adrift from Great Cttcafita^if tbe electors of Ghteat Britain could jo'y realise tbe position, they woold vote at next general election, which be thought Q Ight probably come off in a few weeks, for 14138 cardinal principle, and that was to main. orin one flag and one Parliament for the whole the United Kingdom. (Applause). On the motion of Mr Mitchell a hearty vote M thanks was accorded Mr Neale for bis j^ress, and Mr Neale returned thanks to Mr 'fchell for presiding. TALYBONT. jOn Tuesday night Mr Neale addressed a esting at Talybont. The Rev W. Lloyd pre- yed over a good attendance. The speaker e*lt in detail with the Radical claim to bave a *Qdate for Home Rale and criticised tbe ^visions of tbe Home Rale Bill, his remarks o|lQg followed with close attention. At tbe Mr S. Rees put about a dozen questions lcb were answered by Mr Neale, apparently the complete satisfaction of tbe audience, < d when tbe Cbairman moved a vote of thanks to the-spewker it was seconded by Mr S. Rees carried with applause. CEFN COED. „ ^t the Stocks, Cefn, on Monday evening, an j^O-air Conservative meeting was held, the ^paker being Mr A. J. Hutson, of the South ^ales Tariff Reform Federation. It was well *i*nded, and Mr Hutson was given every w*Qti°n, bis grasp and knowledge of bis sub demanding it. Numerous questions were ed him, all of which were dealt with in a capable and satisfactory manner. Mr Q.^es Davies, Conservative Agent, acted as airman, and introduced the speaker. CWMTAF. fcjPo Tuesday evening, at the Huts, Llwynon, a fordid meeting was held, the speaker being ej -A.. J. Hutson, who most ably and convin- hjfly dealt with the various points of Tariff l^Jorm, and the questions put and his replies undoubtedly assisted in adding adherents Wu cause" ^Pen exPre&sion was made as to K hearers' enlightenment, and all enjoyed tbe ,.It and straightforward discourse, throughout lch the utmost attention was paid. Mr Hut- Q thanked the meeting very much for it. Mr 4""Ba Davies, Conservative Agent for the dis- Gpg > in proposing a vote of thanks to tbe er» intimated that very soon they would ju e. the opportunity of listening to their pros- bve candidate, Mr Conway Lloyd, 1 ABERCRAVE. blnmedlately after the Miners' Meeting in the 4hool Yard at Aibercrave, on Monday night Jc#' Henry Thomas, of Pencwarcoch, Pen- *jL^ho bad presided with great tact and judgment, again annexed the office of d^ii for a Conservative Meeting, and ,ea on Mr Geo. L. Paton, of the National \)lo.nist Association, to give an address on the Jtical situation from the Unionist standpoint. ?aid the attemPt by the Radical, to t Separatist, and Labour Socialist groups ill ore through Parliament the Home Rule o^ithput first submitting it to the judgment e British people was contrary to the whole tj0 t anr Great Britain, and gross over- ^o^^talion in the British House of Com- H Purely it was no unreasonable demand that the nnits in the Union should be by having the Home Rule Bill sub- to the whole electorate as a direct issue. If it were claimed that already the exPressed their judgment on Home historical fact told them that Mr Jn 0ne's first Home Rule Bill was defeated ItQI1 ne 8th 1886, in the House of Commons. "rty recked and ruined the historical Liberal the" 4 %vas Gladstone's greatest blunder, for 'WR Rerllral election which followed the result s Qlon'8ts, 894 Gladstonian Liberals and eParatist, 276, a> clear Unionist majority Th011 came Mr Gladstone's second Of^itt *893. Home Rule Bill No. 2 was tl! ^891- *.° ^e electors at the genernl Vieciion •i• &er even more disastrous results to ^atist cause. Tbe figures were—Union- • Separatists, 25' Unionist majority, 152. Tbat sealed the fate of Home Rule Bill No.2. Was there any wonder that the Separatist Coalition dreaded "a third appeal" to the judg. ment of the country, or that Mr Asquith should be doubtful of success at the tribunal where Mr Gladstone twice failed ? So Home Rule Bill No. 3 was to be put on the Statuft Book by a trick It was not the present intention of the Radical Government to consult the people they pretended to trust, or to ask for the judgment of the British people by general election before they forced throughParliament their revolution- ary measure. The Unionist Party urged in emphatic but very democratic terms that the voice and vote of the people should be heard and taken before Home Rule became law by statute (applause). Questions being invited, Mr Paton was asked "You cannot deny the majority in Ireland are in favour of Home Rule—why should not the majority rule ?" He replied "I do not deny that in Ireland the majority favour Home Rule. But Ireland is a unit in a Union, and has been so for 114 years. I demand that the destruction of the Union, the separate Parliament for Ireland, and the terms and conditions contained in the bill, which are wholly new, and are on wickedly bad lines, shall be submitted by ballot vote or general election to the judgment of the whole of the electors of the Union (applause). It is a just demand Mr Paton was next asked What have the Tory Party ever done for the working man ?" He replied: Everything that every working man holds most dear to-day in the political arena was the work and gift of past Tory Governments!" (Disorder, laughter, and cries of Rot!" and 41 Rubbish !") Mr Paton stood smiling, and after the noise subsided, said :— May I be permitted to prove my statement ?" (cries of You cannot.") It was a treat to hear-date and day, and the titles of over a hundred Acts passed by Union- ist Governments in the 30 years prior to 1906 that proved up to the hilt the superlative.claim of the Conservatives as labour legislators on the present support of the workers. Having fully established their past record, Mr Paton con. cluded What we have done before we can do again, and better from past experience." The Chairman and the Speaker were both awarded hearty rounds of applause, and the meeting, numbering about 500 men, peacefully separated. YSTRADGYNLAIS. On Tuesday night, in the Ystradgynlaig Square, another largely attended meeting was addressed by Mr Paton. Mr H Wade Evans, of Bryncelyn, Yetalyfera, took the chair. Mr Paton said there was undisputed evidence that the present Radical Government was now entirely out of touch with the political needs of the moment, and had lost the confidence and support of the electors. (Cries of No, No.) If that was not so, why could not they find a seat for tbeir twice rejected Cabinet Minister, Mr Masterman ? It was because they were a discredited and disgraced government, they dreaded to consult the people on their Irish policy. (Applaase). Nothing could now save us from civil war tint an appeal to the people, if that even were not too late. Mr Paton dealt clause by clause with tbe Home Rule Bill, exposing the wickedly unjast terms on which Radicals propose to destroy the legislative Union. Clause 13, which gives 42 Irish members full powers to sit, speak, and vote in the Irish Parliament, as well as in the British Parliament, he denounced as too ample justice to Ireland and a gross insult and grave injustice to Great Britain (Applause). Mr Paton also gave the separate cost of Irish finance as involving eaob family in Great Britain to the extent of 15s lid per family per annum. Then, proceeded Mr Paton, as if that was not enough to wring from us, clause 26 said that 65 Irish Members were to come over to the British Parliament for the purposes of revision, viz., to sit, Bgeak, and vote British money for Irish purposes, on equivalent terms with our representatives, with full revising powers over Irish and also British financial; provisions. It would pass the wit of man to devise a more iosane and unfair proposal! (Hear, bear and applause). Qaestions being invited, several Socialists put queries from Socialism's standpoint. Mr Paton replied to the effect that the British people are a practical people and have waited 100 years to see if Socialiets would practise what they preach, or furnish us with an example or model of their system None being forthcoming, we Unionists were dealing with real social reforms, doing the most urgent things first. We Unionists were real reformers, not tinkerers. (Laughter and applause). Votes of thanks were awarded Chairman as and Speaker. LLANGYNIDR. CHOIR AND SCHOOL TRIP.—The Church Sunday School and Choir bad their annual trip on Saturday last. The venue this year was Llangorse, and the weather proving propitious a most enjoyable day was spent. Two waggODR and the rector's motor-oar took the party, and the joaruey ont aud home was not the least enjoyable portion of the day's programme* After a capital lunch et the Red Lton Hotel, tbe party adjourned to the lake, where boating and fibbing were freely indulged in. Ooe of the visitors made a reputation tor himself as a fisherman, catching 45 perch. After tea, sports, under the direction of Mr Frank EvaDB, took place on the Common. The "waggoners" had the better of it going baok, as the motor-car, owing to a burst tyre, came ic a bad third. Both Choir and Sunday School feel greatly indebted to the following ueutlemen for their generosity :—Mr D Powell ,Jones, J.P. (of Messrs A Jones & Sons, timbe: merchants), wbo gave tbe free services of a waggon and pair of horsep, together with driver Mr Wm. Edwards, Hill Gate, for the free use of a pair of horses and his own and his son's services, and Mr James Price, Gliffaes Farm, for the loan of bis waggon). PRIZE DAY AT THR SCHOOL —Prizes for good attendanoe and conduct prpeietitd by the County Council were given oat at the School on the 10th inst. Miss 0 D Salt, of Gliffaen, kindly attended to make tbo presentations, Mrs Salt accompanying her. The rector (the Rev D J Evans) was also present aoj addressed tbe scholars. Cyril Gibbs, (Jlynne H Roberts and Vera Anne Roberts bad put in perfect attendances, while 39 other pupils received prizes. A special prize (a book value 5/- net) was awarded to Glynne Roberts for perfect attendance for five years. On the proposition of the Rector, a hearty vote of thanks was passed to Miss Salt for her services. GARTH. HOLIDAY.—The Council School wag closed on Friday—a holiday being given in recognition of the splendid attendance made daring the months of May and June. NOTICED.—Tbat a swallow bas been this year again in undisturbed possession of a nesting- place inside the waiting room on the down platform at the railway station. That traffic in timber hauling, both to and from the station, has been exceptionally heavy daring tbe past fortnight. That tbe ungatbered crops of hay are not so heavy as one might have expected after such favourable spring and early summer weather. Tbat tb« wells are now opened daily, and boating tacilities are available on tbe Irfon. That be exJensive work of renovation at Garth House is rapidly proceeding and will be completed very shortly. That during the past decade tbe nnaiber of farm workers in Breconsbire bas only increased 1-3 per cent., Breconsbire has only increased 1'3 per cent., whilst the increase in Cardiganshire is 13*8 per cent. AGENCY.—Tbe local agent for the Brecon County Timea is Me W H Pearce, Oiiderwen, Boalab, wbo will be pleased to distribnte tbe paper on the day of istue, weekly, to intending TIUBBCRIBERB or make such local arrangements aa will ensure their receiving it on Thursday [ evening.

BRECON HOUSING INQUIRY I

BRECON HOUSING INQUIRY. I SOME AFTER REFLECTIONS. Hope for the best" may be a very good motto, but in public affairs, at any rate, it is sound policy to be prepared for the worst. Brecon will be well advised, therefore, to pre- pare for an order from the Local Government Board to undertake a municipal housing scheme, as the result of last week's public inquiry. One would be sorry to misjudge the gentleman who conducted the inquiry but, carefully watching the proceedings, one was impressed more and more, as certain questions were put to witness after witness, with the idea that the Local Government Board Inspector had formed, or was forming, the opinion that houses are needed in Brecon and that it is the place of the Town Council to supply them regardless of all diffi. culties. This idea may be wrong, but it is held by others who carefully followed the inquiry. Whether the peculiar difficulties of Brecon, or the proved fact that the agitation for the public inquiry was to a great extent a hollow sham, will influence the report to the Local Govern- ment Board time alone can show. The credit- able effort of a few tradesmen to provide a building society, in the hope of staving off a risky public experiment, was treated in a very off. handed fashion by those responsible for running the case for a municipal housing scheme, who seemed to forget that the old French proverb may be sometimes reversed with e:ffect those who impute motives generally have motives to conceal. The Inspector, one realised, was in no way influenced by the attempt to belittle a genuine private effort, but it is not unlikely that he thought it had come a little late in the day. The Brecon Town Council and their officials, unfortunately, went into the inquiry with their bands tied, and bad the mortifying experience of finding outsiders—who know and apparently care nothing of the underlying facts which no housing scheme, public or private, will get rid of-willing to join in the popular cry for im. mediate public action. In their past dealing with the housing question the Council have borne in mind the poverty of most of the people who live in the houses of an admittedly un- desirable character, and have as a result of this kindly thought often foreborne to take drastic action on official reports. Now they and their officials are rewarded for their consideration by being held up to scorn for neglect of duty, and we must expect a public housing scheme for one or more of three small classes-meu who are here to-day and may be gone to-morrow, men who don't pay their rents, or men who, being poor, live in houses that are too small because they cannot afford to pay for larger ones. The party agitator glibly tells us municipal housing will pay in Brecon. It may, but it will not pay if it is undertaken for those most in need of more room. The Brecon bousing problem, in so far as it is capable of cure, can be cured by private enterprise that private enterprise will have a chance, after last week's experience, is quite another matter. One makes the reserva- tion as to capability of cure advisedly. Despite the theorists, who, in face all experience, still harp on the notion that dirty people will become clean and drunken people sober if removed from one street to another, it is as certain as that night follows day, whatever the Local Govern- J ment Board may order, the worst features of the housing question in Brecon will remain un- touched, because they have to do with human nature as well as with buildings. If you are not a Radical, you crawl on all fours in Brecon. This is one of the lessons of the housing inquiry. It expresses the view generally held by the Radical Party of those people who, being poorly off, yet refuse to enrol themselves under the latest political banner, which, if it means anything, means this-keep all you have got and pet everything you can from everybody else. In other words, it re- presents Socialism turned into selfishness, and robbed of the self-sacrifice of the individual for I the good of the community which has attracted so many thoughtful people towards Socialism as a creed. One hopes that the people of Brecon will remember for all time that (unless they are Radicals) they are crawling slaves 1 Another thing arising in part out of the Brecon housing inquiry bad better be mentioned. One enterprising amateur housing inspector has got into trouble with a business inspector in authority over him in business. The amateur is a Radical-and so is the official inspector who has authority over.*him! Here is real comedy. One would not have mentioned it; however, were it not that long experience teaches that the incident must offer a great temptation to the party man to get up a case of victimisation. It may stop any such foolish- ness in Brecon just now to give this hint that the facts are known. And the inquiry has bad farcical results, too. One has seen Radicals who were pushing it and Radicals who were against it having wordy wars in the street, and it is with unholy joy that one notices how these saints are loving one another just now.

BRECON COUNTY SCHOOLS

BRECON COUNTY SCHOOLS. List of Scholarship Awards. A meeting of the Brecon County. Schools Governors was held on Tuesday afternoon; present Archdeacon Bevan (chairman), Miss Adelaide Williams, Miss Phillip Morgan, the Revs. R. C. Richards, and Hilary Lewis, Messrs J. Conway Lloyd, A. Beckwith, Edward Bntler, Evan Morgan, and David Powell, with the clerk (Mr T. J. Parry), the headmaster (Mr Percy Morton) and the Headmistress (Miss Davies.) COÐsiderable discussion took place with reference to the drawing up of an altered curriculum for the Boys' School. The Head. master stated that he bad a conversation with one of the Board of Education's Inspectors the other day and he said that the Board would not consider the proposed change in the currioalam of the school if the Governors did not provide additional teachers for those pupils who applied for exemption from French and Latin. There were several warm wordy passages between some of the members and the Head- master, as to who really was responsible for drawing up the time table and onrriculam. Mr J. Conway Lloyd remarked he did not quite see that Mr Morton was right ip lecturing them on their duties and responsibilities. The Headmaster said that in the past the voice of the Governors had been, not what should be the curriculum but what should not be the curriculum. Eventually it was decided to ascertain at the beginning of the September term bow many pupiis required agricultural instruction, and to advertise tbe change. SCHOLARSHIPS. The Governors made the following scholar- ship awards at the Boys' and Girls' Schools Girls' Sebool:-I, Beatrice Bate, 10, Ship street, (Mount Street School), 193 marks; 2, Annie Noella Pugh, 93, The Street (Mount Street Scbooi), 155 marks 3. Mary Morgan, 1, Wellington PJaca, (Meant Street Scbooi), 138 marks 4, Myfanwy Griffiths, Watergate Maiise, (Mount Street School). 137 marks 5, Kathleen Talmage, 91, The Watton (Muunt Street School), 134 market; and 6, Margorie Roberts, 17, Free Street, 133. Boys' School:-I, David Rees William?, Pool Farm, Cradoo (Mount Street School), 211 marks; 2. Harry W. Pogh, 9, Bridge Street, Brecon (Llanfaes Council School), 197 marks 3, Philip Davies, Yscirfscban, Mertbyr Cynog (Mount Street School), 190 marks.

Advertising

CONCERT and Entertainment Promoters will do well to Inspeot Specimens of Posters, ifca., and inquire Prices at the Brecon Coanty Times Office.

I BRECON TOWN COUNCIL

BRECON TOWN COUNCIL. A PROGRESSIVE MEETING. The Mayor (Councillor Evan Morgan) presided over the monthly meeting of the Brecon Town Council, held oa Tuesday. Others present were Aldermen E. A. Wright and David Powell, Councillors Miss Philip Morgan, J. W: Hedger, C. W. Best, J. Conway Lloyd, H. C. Rich, William Morgan, Gwilym Jones and William Williams, with the Town Clerk (Mr G. Hyatt Williams) and the Borough Surveyor (Mr Llewelyn Griffiths). MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT. Dr. Valentine Rees (medical officer) reported that eight deaths were registered during Jane, equal to an annual rate of 16-2 per thousand inhabitants. The town was now free from infectious disease, with the exception of a mild case of scarlatina. The child was convalescent, and he did not apprehend any spread of the disease. He had inspected a single-room tene- ment in the Struet which was, in his opinion, unfit for occupation. In reply to a member the Surveyor said the house was No. 46b, the Struet. Ald. Powell moved that a closing order be made, Mr Gwilym Jones seconded, and it was agreed to. 'Ald. Powell said he would like it to go forth that the house was not occupied. Mr Best The closing order should be made nevertheless. Ald. Powell Oh, yes. THE HOUSING QUESTION. A letter was read from Mr J. M. Brookes, bon. secretary to the Brecon Chamber of Trade, enclosing the following resolution of the Chamber :—"That this meeting of the Brecon Chamber of Trade suggests that the Brecon Town Council does not embark on a municipal building scheme, and considers that if houses are required in the town they should be erected on the co-operative system, and wishes to inform the Council that the Chamber is now considering the formation of a society to promote such a scheme." Ald. Wright That is satisfactory. ^.r Hedger It is a pity that could not have been bad before, to be placed before the inspector. ST. MARY'S CHURCH IMPROVEMENT. PROPOSED ROAD WIDENING. The Town Clerk read the following letter from Archdeacon Bevan :—"The removal of the houses adjoining St. Mary's Church will shortly be completed. Before we proceed to lay out the ground we should be glad to know whether your Council would desire to take the opportunity of widening the street at this point. If this should be the case we shall be very glad to discuss the matter." The Town Clerk suggested that a small committee be appointed. Aid. Powell It is a very desirable improve. ment. Mr Best moved that Ald. Wright, Ald. Powell and the two senior councillors, with the Mayor, act as a committee, and Mr William Williams seconded. Aid. Powell Mr Best would be very useful on the committee. Eventually the committee was appointed, with Mr Best's name added. RUBBISH IN THE USK. The Mayor reported that he had seen Mr I Cobb with regard to the rubbish in the Usk, and he was quite agreeable for the Council to take steps to have it removed. As to the rubbish thrown into the river below the bridge, he was prepared to support the Council in the prosecu. tion and prevention of people throwing things into the river. Mr William Williams Do you intend taking any steps as a Council to have the rubbish removed ? The Mayor It will be brought up at the Works Committee. Miss Morgan proposed that the matter be discussed at the Works Committee, and Mr William Williams seconded. Mr Hedger Mr Cobb did not say how far he was prepared to assist us in the matter ? The Mayor He is not prepared to assist us as far as the accumulation is concerned, but to assist us in the prosecution and prevention of people throwing rubbish into the river. Mr Conway Lloyd It is high time something was done. It was agreed to discuss the matter at the Works Committee. WORKS AND GENERAL PURPOSES. The Surveyor read the report of the Works and General Purposes Committee. This dealt with the estimated cost of constructing pave- ment and channelling around the new London City and Midland Bank and making up Victoria street, and recommended that the work be done. Certain drainage, eaves-troughing and cellar flap notices had been served during the month. Eight cottages had been inspected on change of tenancy and the housing notices bad been served as directed at the last meeting. Plans of the garage proposed to be erected in Market street for Messrs J. E. Nott and Co., and of two cottages to be erected in the Struet for Mr David Powell were recommended for approval. A letter was read from Mr H. Price Williams, Aberclydach House, stating that it was his intention to immediately build work. men's cottages on his Free street building site, provided the Town Council would obtain the consent of the Local Government Board to considerably reduce the width of the roadway from that required by the existing Brecon bye- laws and further requesting the Council to materially contribute towards the cost of the road and sewer. The committee recommended that a copy of Mr Williams' letter be trans. mitted to the Local Government Board asking for permission to relax the bye-laws to permit a less width of roadway, and that Mr Williams be requested to submit a plan showing exactly what width of road be required. A letter was read from Mr Roger L. Williams offering a contribution of iZi towards the improvement of the Dainter North road, provided the Council will adopt the said road. The committee recommended that the Council do not deviate from their previous decision. Ald. Powell asked what was the estimated 'r cost of carrying out the work on Dainter road. The Surveyor £ 40. I Mr Best said it was made clear on Saturday with regard to the second question of Mr H. Price Williams that they could not pledge themselves until they beard from the Local Government Board upon the matter. The report was adopted, on the motion of the Mayor, seconded by Mr Rich. Miss Morgan said she had been asked to bring forward the question of putting chippings on the tar pavement in St. John's road. It was stated the matter could be considered when the next half-year's estimate was under discussion.

No title

THE Board of Trade have issued a notice to employers and workmen in insured trades calling attention to the fact that the unemploy- ment books for 1913-14 cease to be current on Saturday next, July 18th, and must be exchanged for new books during the week ending July 25th. Under the Unemployment Insurance Regulations stamps affixed to 1913-14 books are not vahd contributions after July 18th. It is, therefore, of importance that the new books be obtained before July 25th. For the purpose of facilitating the exchange of books the local office at Brecon will be open until 9 p.m. on Saturday. July 18tb, and 7 o'clock on other nights during the week above J mentioned. Employers are also reminded that applications for refunds under section 94 of the Act, in respect of workmen contiouously em. ployed through the twelve months ended 14th July, 1914, must be made not later than August 14th next. The necessary forms of application and instructions may be obtained at any Labour Exchange or local office.

CONSERVATIVE DASH

CONSERVATIVE DASH. Next Week's Programme. In addition tp. the big round of open air Conservative meetings being held in Brecon- shire this week, Mr T. Maund, agent and secre- tary to the Breconshire Conservative Associa. tion, has arranged the following meetings for next week. The speaker at each will be Mr A. J. Hutson, of the South Wales Tariff Reform Federation Cwmdu, Monday, July 20th, opposite the Old Six Bells, at 7.30 p.m. Brynmawr, Tuesday,- July 21st, on the Market Square, at 7.30 p.m. Clydacb, Wednesday, July 22nd, on the Recreation ground, at 7 p.m. Tafarnaubacb, Thursday, July. 23rd, at 7.45 p.m. Beaufort Friday, July 24th, near the Globe Ian, at 7 p.m.

BRECONSHIRE ARBITRATION

BRECONSHIRE ARBITRATION. Mr Owen Price's Award. Mr Owen Price, of Nantyrharn, Cray, who was appointed to act as arbitrator, in a dispute between Mr D. T. Griffiths, owner of Penclyn Farm, in the parish of Modrydd, county of Brecon, and Mr Ll. Williams, the former tenant of the farm, has made the following award Mr LI. Williams is entitled to receive JE32 10a. 3d. from Mr Griffiths as compensation in respect of improvements and all other sums claimed by bim, and Mr Griffiths is entitled to receive from Mr Williams the sum of Xg 14s. 8d. as compensation in respect of his counterclaim. Each party to the arbitrate to pay his own costs and one-half the costs of the arbitrator. Mr James Gunter, estate agent, of Glasbury, and Mr Howell Powell, auctioneer, of Brecon, were the umpires who acted for the parties to the dispute.

ABERG WESSIN NEW BRIDGE

ABERG WESSIN NEW BRIDGE. Builth Rural Council's Enterprise. Mr Thomas Pugh, Wernfawr, presided over a meeting of the Bailth Rural District Council held on Monday, and others present were Messrs C W Woosnam, E Aubrey Thomas, Thos. Davies, S G Talk, Thomas Pugh (Necy- building), Rees Jones, Reea Davies, James Jones, David Davies. David Joogp, Edward Owen, Reginald J. Owen (clerk), Llewelyn Jones (highway surveyor), and William Evaus (sanitary inspector). The Committee appointed to inspect the two suggested sites for a, new bridge at Abergwesain reported that they met there on June 204b, present Councillors 0 W Woosnam, S G Talk, Thomas Davies, Isaac Thomas, Thomas Pugh and David Davies, together with Mr Llewelyn Jones (highway surveyor), Councillors Roger Evans, John J. Hope and Mr Thomas P Hope. Tbey carefully considered the points advanced for and against the two sites. Site No. 1, or the original site suggested was sitoated about 30 yards above the existing ford across the Irfon. The length of new rosd that would be required for this site would be some 110 yards, measuring from the right hand bank (looking up the stream) to a point where such new road would join the existing district road. The cost of making this road woald be very small, as it would be necessary to slightly alter the bed of the Gwessin and this would afford ample material on the spot for the road construction and for any oement concrete protection that might be required. The road. way and approaches to the bridge would be extremely good and free from sharp ends, and woold be constructed 00 good sound ground, well above flood level. Site No.2 was some 150 yards higher np the stream. The length of road to be made for this site would be some 286 yards, over one third of which would have to be out through meadow land, a portion of which was wet aud boggy, and this would require a large quantity of hard stone to form a good foundation. The approach to the bridge on the left hand side (looking up the stream) would necessitate a sharp bend in the road leading on to the bridge, while at the point where the road would again join the existing district road it would be necessary to cot through trees aDd fenoes of private property. The Committee were unanimous in recom. mending Site No. 1 as by far the most con. venient and the cheapest. They were also of opinion that a bridge at this point over the Irfon was urgently needed, and would point out that if erected the sum of from 940 to X50, estimated by the Surveyor as required to repair the existing old road, would be saved, as this portion of road would be rendered obsolete by the bridge. Mr James Jones proposed, and Mr Thomas Davies, Glancamddwr, seconded, and it was unanimously resolved that the report of the Committee be adoptod, that a bridge be erected on Site No. 1, and that the Surveyor take steps to prepare plans and specifications to be submitter to the Council at a future meeting. The ClerK was also instructed to serve the necessary notices, so as to facilitate the work.

NEWBRIDGEONWYE

NEWBRIDGE-ON-WYE. THE LATE MR B D LLOYD -On Wednesday afternoon week the body of Mr benjamin David Lloyd, of Newbridge on-Wye, was laid at rest in All Saints' Churchyard, in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends. Along the route from the house to the Church blinds were drawn as an evidence of the esteen in which the deceased was held iu the village. The chief mourners were Mrs Lloyd (widow), Mr Evans (father-in-law), Mrs Lloyd (mother), Mr Charlie Lloyd (brother), Miss Bessie Lloyd (sister), Miss Nellie Lloyd (sister), Mrs Evans, Mrs R Lloyd (sisters-in-law), Mr and Mrs Drew, (brother-in-law and sister), Mrs T Morgan, Bryncetbin (sister-in-law), Mrs Davies, Ystrad- Rbondda (niece), Mrs Evans (Llandrindod Wells), Mrs Boore (Llandrindod Wells), Mr James Jones, Mr John Jones and Messrs H and T Evans, Llwyncoibren. The bearers were Messrs Roberts, F Walters, J Davies, J Thomas, Fred Hammonds, and T Pritchard, Post Office. The coffin was of polished oak, with brass fittings, and on the breast plate was inscribed "Benjamen David Lloyd, died July 4tb, 1H14, aged 33 years." The Rev H C Edwards con- ducted a brief service at the house aud the Rev J H Griffiths, Vicar, officiated at the church and graveside. As the procession entered the church the organist, Miss Griffiths played "Oh rest in the Lord." The service was fully choral and tbe hymns sung were "God moves in a mysterious way" and ''For ever with tbe Lord." As the body was carried out of church Miss Griffiths played the "Dead March." Flowers were sent by the widow, mother, Bessie, Nellie, I and Charlie (sisters and brother), Sallie and t family, Ystrad-Rhondda, Thomas and Bella Morgan, Bryncethin, aunt and cousins at Birmingham, "Lil, Daisy, Violet, and Effie" (Somersetshire), Miss Venables, Llysdinam, Newbridge-on-Wye Football Club Committee, Mr and Miss Dyke and family, Tegfan, New- bridge on-Wye, from Tyllwyd, Mr and Mrs Howells and Miss Davies, Howey, Archie and M Strange, F and M Hammond, Glangwye, all at Llwyncoibren, the Rev J H Griffiths and Mrs Griffiths, the Vicarage, Mr and Mrs Fred Davies, Llanyre, "all at Peabont," I-Mid-Wales, Mr and Mrs M H Hope, "an old friend," Mr and Mrs Venables Llewelyn, Llysdiman, Mr and Mrs Cleaton, "friends at Porthllwyd," Mr and Mrs Bryant, and others.

BRECONSHIRE LADYS ACTION

BRECONSHIRE LADY'S ACTION. Dispute Over Family Estate. Two aotions having reference to the estate of the late Mr John Shaw, of Welbnro Hall, Yorkshire, who was a large colliery owner, and whose estate was valued at nearly £ 1,000,000, came before Mr Justice Wartington in the Chancery Division on Monday, and were beard together. The plaintiffs were the Hon. Ethel Mildred Devereux, of Tregoyd, Three Cocks, Brecon (wife of the Hon. R. C. Devereux), and Lady Garnock, of Caxton Hall, Yorkshire, and the defendant in both cases was Colonel John Reginald Shaw, of Cantly Hall, Doncaster, the administrator of Mr Shaw, who died intestate. The object of the actions was to obtain a declaration that £ 20,000 worth of debentures in the West Kirby, Featberstone, and Hems. worth Collieries (Limited) was as to X-10,000 subject to the marriage settlement trust of Mrs Devereux, and as to XIO,000 subject to the trost of the marriage settlement of Lady Garnock. Mr H. E. Terrell, H.C., M.P., and Mr Wilkinson appeared for the plaintiffs, and Mr Upjohn, E.C., and Mr Owen Thomson for the defendant. Mr Terrell, in opening both actions together, said that the late Mr Shaw was an exceedingly wealthy gentleman and a great colliery owner. He died on August 16th, 1911, intestate, and left five children. His eldest son, Colonel John Reginald Sbaw, defendant, was his lather's administrator. The deceased often expressed bis desire that his property should be divided amongst his children equally, but, unfortunately, since his death there had been a good deal of friction, and these were the thirteenth and fourteenth actions which had been brought. Mr Upjohn Commenoed by your client. Mr Terrell: In order to get anything like recognition of their rights. Counsel, proceeding, said on January 14tb, 1892, in anticipation of Mrs Devereux's marriage, a settlement was made by her father ¡' of X30,000 in trust for his daughter, her husband, and tbe children. In October of tbat same year Lady Garnock was about to be martied, and the father executed a similar' settlement upon her husband. There was no settlement on the marriage of Colonel Shaw, but in 1902 the father executed a settlement in favour of him and bis children. In August, 1903, bis father made a farther settlement upon Mr Deverenx of £15,000, and in Marob, 1904, a similar supplemental settlement of < £ 15,000. The intestate was very generous to his children. On or about November, 1907, the late Mr Sbaw intimated his intention of giving his daughters a further XIO,000 each to be settled upon them. It was decided that the I securities should be debentures in the colliery company. These debentures were issued by the company, and for a time the plaintiffs received the half-yearly interest from their father. It was now suggested, said counsel, that these were voluntary payments and not interest on the debentures which the plaintiffs alleged bad been given to them. I Mrs Devereux, in the box, stated that in the year 1907, in November, she was staying at I Welbarn Hall with her father. One day they 1 were out walking and her father said to witness that he proposed to give her gio,wi for a birthday present. He proposed to give her sister, Lady Garnock, a similar sum. Witness said that the matter was mentioned on sub. I sequent occasions and ultimately the deben. tares were issued and she and her sister regularly received a cheque in respect of the interest. Lady Beatrice Mary Garnock gave similar I evidence as to her father's gift. The hearing was continoed on Tuesday and I Wednesday, and eventually jodgment was 1 given for the defendant in both actions, with costs. I

Llanwrtyd Wells Notes

Llanwrtyd Wells Notes. [BY JUNGLE-WALLAH."] t One hundred visitors were added to the I merry throng already present at Llanwrtyd I on Saturday last. One hundred and forty t trippers paid a visit during the week. but through an unforeseen circumstance the four hundred from Pantyffynon did not arrive. There was a great day at "Clyncae" on Friday last, the occasion being the annual shear. Two thousand six bondred animals were clipped, more than sixty shearers being employed. Mr William Jones, from Haver- ford west way, was present again this year, aod I daresay, adding those who accepted of the usual cordial invitation, olose npon ooe hun- dred peonle were provided for. The day was hot, and work appeared irksome, but all was over as soon as darkness set in, and the rattle of hoofs through Llanwrtyd about 9 p.m. was an indication that the shearings of our districts bad once more come and gone. At our Police Court, on Thursday laBt, Thos. Williams, Derw House, was fined 10s., including oosts, for being drank on licensed premises. P.S. Edwards proved the case. A rate case in I which Alfred Ernest Williams figured as de. fendant was settled out of Court. The attendance at the Auction Mart on 1 Wednesday last week was large, bat buyers < were scarce. Very little stock was disposed of ( under the hammer, but I bear that consider- able business was done privately. Prices were j as follows: fat lambs, 189 to 26s; weathers, 25s; cows and calves, iCl3 to £ 17; calveq-t Y.1 10s. to &4 15s. i To use a military shooting term oar local j section of Terriers are planking them on this season. At the shoot at Builth Olr Satar- day last, Sergt. Tom Davies, Corpl. G. W. Evans, and Privates Richards, Stanton, and j Ingram, were in good form. Tbe shoot will be j continued on Saturday next, after wbicb I hope ] to get a list of scores. ]1 On Thursday last the Llandovery and VSD- dilo branches of the Girls' Friendly Society visited Llanwrtyd, and the service, held at 12 30, at St. James' Charch, was taken by the Rev. D. Edmonds Owen, vicar of Llandovery, and an appropriate address was delivered by the Rev J. E. Lloyd, Vicar of Llanwrtyd Wells. The afternoon was spent in a visit to the Abernant Lake—a most enjoyable time. After tea, which was served in the pavilion, the party entrained home, much impressed by their visit to the Spa. The presentation to the Vicar and Mrs Lloyd is reported on page 6

No title

SOCTH AFRICAN FARMERS' TOUR. Ou Sat- urday, the 6th Jane, a party of Soaih Afris^ct t farmere lef5 Cape Town for a tour of Great ■ Britain and Holland. It is being carried cut on the initiative and the expense of Sir Owen Pbilipps, of the Union Castle Steamship Cow- pany. A stipulation has been laid down by tbe various Agricultural Unions wi-lich eleoted the delegates from all parts of Sooth Africa j that on their return they must be prepared to deliver lectares in the various areas of the dis- f triel-s they represent. Eich delegate has been famished with data enabling him to state fairly accurately the land which can be acqaired, what it is suitable for, where obtain- able, and tbe average price. A stock of easily conveyable and non-perishable samples is alss j being oarried..

LLANGATTOCK LANDLORD VICTIMISED

LLANGATTOCK LANDLORD VICTIMISED. "Tom Pal" who was no Pal. I've won the bet; my daughter bet me a shilling that I should not be here by too o'clook, and it's DOW only just gone six," was the introduction thr; landlord of the Horse Shoe Ian, Llangattock, received on tha evening of Jane 2€tb laut, when Thomas Davies, a man between 60 and 70 years of age, called at tba bouse. The old man was broagbt before ft i special Police Court at Ctickhowall on Saturday last, having been arrested at Tredegar work. boosri, on a warrant issaed at the instance of J the landlord of the Horse Shoe Ion, Mr W Boilings Ramsey. The magistrates present were Mr E Pirie Gordon and Dr P E Hill. Mr Ramsey told the coart that the defendant, after introducing himself as above describsdt said bis daughter told him to go to the Horsa Shoe Ion and stay there until the following Thursday, when she would call for him and pay for what he bad there. The defendant remained nine days altogether. On the Thurs- day evening the daughter did not arrive, aod I the defendant excused her absence on the ground that she had sent a message by a Mr Walbyoff, of Brynmawr, tosay that she could 'I not get there until the foliowing Sitarday. After borrowing sixpence from witness on the- Saturday morning, and saying that he was going to Crickhowell to meet his daughter, who was coming by the motor buB, he dis- appeared and did not come back again. Witness wrote to defendant's daughter, a Mra Wheeler, of Nantyglo, srd she bad replied denying authorising her father to pledge her credit. In consequence of this, be issued a warrant charging defendant with obtaining by false pretences board and lodgings to the valud of 14s, borrowed money 12s 5d, and an ounce of tobacco 4 £ d— £ 1 69 9-,1,Id altogether. Mrs Wheeler, aod her sister, Mra E Davies, of Ebbw Vale, both attended the Court and denied authorising their father to pledge their credit, and the former denied sending any message to Mr Ramsey by Mr Walbyoff. The latter also said be did not deliver any message to the defendant. He knew the defendant well, having worked with him for thirty years. The defendant was then known as "Tom Pal." He (witness) never knew him by any other name. The defendant, who elected to be dealt with summarily, and pleaded guilty, was sentenced to seven days' imprisonment with hard labour, the Chairman remarking that the Bench were sorry to see the old man in such a position.

GLASBURY

GLASBURY. MlSSONARY EXHIBITION.—On Thursday, the 9b inst., the S.P.G. travelling exhibition van reached Glasbury. The exhibition was held in the Assembly Rooms and commenced at 6 p.m. The rooms on the first floor were given up to tbe snrioe of which there were over 2,000. The Rev. Lambert Rees spent one Itoar in explaining these, then in the large Assembly room, where a good audience bad assembled, a series of tableaux representing life iu the East and the work of the missionaries and medical missionaries was enacted by the children attending St. Peter's school. Before the curtain rose on each tableeux the Rev. Lambert Rees gave a vivid description of it and Mrs Hubert Griffith played soft symphonies while the tableaux were performed. The children of All Saints' then sang some native songs in native costume. These were beautifully rendered. Speeches were also delivered pleading the cause of missions of eight different countries by eight children from St. Peter's school and these were also effectively rendered. The whole performanoe reflected the greatest credit on those who had spent time on training the children. At the close tbo Vicar of All Siatst was thanked for presiding and the Rev. Lambert Rees for his interesting address. TEE LATF. MItiS HENRIETTA DAVIEs.-Wih regret we record the death at Hereford Hospital on Tuesday, the 7th inst., of Miss Henrietta Davies, eldest daughter of Mr Henry Davies, in the employ of the Breconshire Coal Co. and also Conservative agent at Glasbury. The deceased had been a great sufferer for the last two years, and although she passed away at the early age ofl 24, the end came as a release to one who could never be but a sufferer in this life. The corpse arrived in Glasbury on Wednesday evening, the 8th inst., and lay in the parish church, where deceased had been a constant worshipper all her life, awaiting interment. On Friday at J p.m. the funeral service took place. It was conducted by the Vicar (the Rev. H. H. Gibbon) and was folly choral, Mr Davies having been a sidesman at St. Peter's for a number of years. "0 rest in the Lord" preoeeded the service, "Jean lover of my soul,' was sung after the lesson, and as the cortege left the church the "Nuno Dimittis" was sung. After the Committal, "On the resurrection morning" was sung by the school children. The number of beautiful wreaths testified to the high esteem in which the departed and also the family are held in the neigbourhood. Floral tributes were sent by the following Father and mother; Tom, Bert and Percy (brothers); Elsie, Ethel and NoeUa (sisters); Mrs Davies (grandmother); Mr and Mrs Davies, Talgarth (uncle and aunt); Mr and Mrs Davies, Cefn (uncle and aunt) Mr Davies, Brynglessy (uncle) Fred and Cbrissie (cousins); Mr < Greenway (uncle); Cousin Polly; Mr Wm. Abies Alice Cullimore Miss E Jones; Miss Murrel; Mr and Mrs Francis Jones, Tyruohed Mr and Mrs Edward Butler, Aberliynfi Mrs Price, Pipton Mr and Mrs Davies, Porthamal; Mrs Powell, Park View; Mr and Mrs A P Gwynne; Mrs Jones and Brychan, the School Mr and Mrs Whitney Mr and Mrs Fred Smith Gwladys Jenkins; Teachers and scholars St. Peter's school; Mr and Mrs Linney; Ivor Morgan, Post Offioe; Mr and Mrs Morgan, Tyruched; Mr and Mrs Haynes; Miss Jane Watkins May Whitney, Cheltenham Mr Joha Jones; Mr and Mrs Jones, Velindre; Mr and Mrs Morgan; Miss Evans, Forge; May and Gwladys Meredith, Maesddu Mr and Mrs Willis, Builth Mrs Reading and family. Three Cooks Hotel Miss Abies, Kington; Mrs Ijynnock Mrs Williams, Aberliynfi; Mr and Mrs Ricketts, Three Cocks Alice and sisters Mrs Russel and Gertie, Velindre Will; Mr and Mrs Millburn, "velindre Mrs George Price, Velindre Beatrice Wood Mrs Cole and Nellie Mrs Mintcn Mr and Mrs Whittal and Family Mr and Mrs Morgan, Treble Hill All at Bridge Stores Mr and Mrs ?ngb. Typridd; Mrs and Miss Worthing; Mr and Mrs Fountain Uncle and Aunt, the Old Forest, Clyro; Mrs Morgan. Grove gate. The bearers were Messrs Haynes, Whitney, Morgan and Rickette. Mr A. F. Gwynne was: the undertaker.

j PONTSTICILL

j PONTSTICILL. SS0CK3N.; RAILWAY FATALITY—A shocking discovery wan made on the Brecon and Mertbyr Railway between Do!ygaer anS Pontstbilf 00 I Taesday afternoon last week. The driver of the en Brecon train, juat after the former station, aw a man baddled in a heap cbae to the ra i^. tseiog only 20 yards away when be sighted bim, the driver could not puli up. and be went en and reported the matter as rontsticiil. Ori officials Koing to the spot with a ligbt engine, tbe man was found fo b John Harley (43), 2G, Georga Street, j Dowlaisr who was lying dead, train having smashed bis bead. At tbe iuqutst held before Dr W. R. Joe. 8 ca Wednesily, tb- Conner reoufced t he driver, James Davies, for not -stopping tbs_ train; aid Ernest Ba;r, the guard. wsos&id he was responsible for stopping tbe trsta. was told by the Coroner tba: be was moon ic blame for not doing s-e. Dani-ol Pring, a feilow lodger of the deceased, eai3 be tbosaa; Hurley bad «one out for a walk in order to work off tba after-effects of a driukiog bout. A I] open verdict was returned.

ELAN VILLAGE

ELAN VILLAGE. Pb:lliaore> Llwynma<3oc, visaed the Elan Village Sob ol on Friday morniap ;agt aud examined the olnl/iren on the year's work jn Bible in^tructi-ia. Tb? syllabus was that, or the Irfoo Valley Association. After the esanuuatioa the pupils were each given a DJC and orange, and a half-holiday was granted.