Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Advertising

"L-iAn WT Resolve I to use .0000, m6

NOTES FROM ABBRAYBON

NOTES FROM ABBR- AYBON. The news of the death of Mr John Evans, C.M, teacher at Cwmavon, and of Caebaral, Ffosffin, who was killed on a railway cross- ing at Swansea on Saturday, July Srd, was received with marked regret, and there is much sympathy expressed with his be- reaved mother and his two sisters. His remains were interred at Llwyncelyn burial ground on Wednesday, July 7th. Mr Peter Jones of Aberystwyth, took the oath as county justice at Quarter Sessions, Laixpeter, on Thursday, July 1st. He was the only one to be enrolled at those Sessions. There was a pathetic and appropiate solitariness in the act, as there is uniqueness in his position among the public men of Cardiganshire. It is regrettable that these public honours or recognitions come so often in the latter end of conspicuous careers when they add no lustre to acknowledged merit. It is an old reproach against Calvinistic Methodists that they prefer men as deacons who are on the safe side of sixty years of age. The Lord Lieutenant and his advisory committee should be able to discern fitness for magisterial duties in people at a time of life when they may expect from them the fullest service of accumulating experience. At a meeting of the County Licensing Committee at Lampeter, on Quarter Sessions day it was mentioned that a sum of 9700 had already been awarded in compensation, whereas the sum in the fund to discharge the awards is not quite £100. Half the maximum levy only was imposed for the current year. If the full levy had been exacted the Sum realized would hardly cover the amounts already awarded. In the meanwhile some public houses are dying out. Others are lingering in the last stages of decrepitude. In these instances there will be no case for compensation. If the Licensed Victuallers Association would cease to oppose the imposition of the full levy, they would accelerate the extinction of useless houses and in one distinct sense promote their own interests. The number of convictions for drunkenness during the quarter ended 30th June was twenty-four. "Pen Trichrug" on Sunday was a Mount of Transfiguration. Men on the rim of the cairn loomed large, and made giant silhouette* athwart the western sky. One may go to a hill top a hundred times without seeing what he went there for the purpose of seeing. One goes to Trichrug in order to see Bard- sey, Cardigan Head, the Brecon Beacons, and Plunlummon and all the intervening spaces. The atmospheric conditions are rarely our allies for that purpose. But then there are other visions of even greater charm. On Sunday there were illumined thunder clouds. New Quay Head was lit up against a back ground of coal black sky. The Tregaron range was veiled in haze, giving it gigantic proportions. It is a mistake to seek only for a clear day. And there was the sea, in impenetrable gloom, more mystical than ever. "The far Aegean are but a part, A little part of a poetic world By Homer yonder hill were never s ung He saw them not! What would to him have been This Cader, had it thrown his shadow o'er His Cot ? Some grander Ida in his song, And o'er its height a day break of the gods. Oh! for the hand that on our hearts would grave Some awe-inspiring dream of thine, and search Each rock, and cloud, and distant fold of mist To find the mighty thoughts of mauy an age. The awful moans of Nature's inmost depths. Where her broad bosom to the sun doth swell The day, and to the suns beyond, the night." To "Hermon" the people came, one could haroly guess from where. The Sunday School was delightfully uncon- veutional. Heading the V Chapter of II Corinthians, we boldly inditted St. Paul for boastfulness, at any rate, if the ordinary standard which we apply to each other be adhered to In extenuation something was allowed for his ardent temperament, and missionary zeal and the artful and wicked misrepresentations of his traducers in Corinth. "Wag" came there for school and tea. I wonder whether it is the society of neigh- bours or the buzz of school voices, or the chance of some cake crumbs from the tea table, or a canine sense of Sunday observance and worship that brings him unerringly there. Mr John Morgan declared that his sheep dogs will do nothing he asks them to do on Sunday. As proof that it is no workman's claim to a day of rest if he but divesis him- self of his Sunday clothes, thus becoming responsible for secularizing the day, they will immediately obey his orders.

ABERDOVEY

ABERDOVEY. Scholastic success.—Mr. Robert Rich- ards, of Aberdovey, has gamed lias B.A. degree at Aberystwyth by passing in Welsh, philosophy, and Greek. Mr. Richards was educated at the Council School, Aberdovey, and the, County School, Towyn, and was tor some time an assist- ant teacher at Aberdovey Council School. He has been a. student at Aberystwyth University College fer the past three years and intends to go in for the ministry.

Engagement of Professor Levi

Engagement of Professor Levi. The engagement is announced of Pro- fessor Levi, son of the Rev. Thomas Levi, Aberystwyth, to Miss Grieve, daughter of the late Mr John Grieve and Mrs Grieve, of Eastbourne. Miss Grieve belongs to an Eastbourne family, several members of which are serv- ing the country in military and other capacities. Hei* father was a man of a high and distinguished character. He was for many years engaged in India. Miss Grieve's grandfather was sugeto-n-general with the late Lord Roberts in India. Her mother has lately rendered valuable services in connection with wounded soldiers. Miss i Grieve's two brothers hold commissions in the army. She is a member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, East- bourne. Professor Levi is well known in legal, re- ligious, and political circles throughout England and Wales. He was educated at 'Oxford and the Inner Temple. While at Oxford lie was a member of the College boating crew for two years. He took double first and won the Carrington prize in jaw. Having obtained hrst-ciass at the Inner Temple, he was called to the bar at the head of all the candidates. He prac- tised as conveyancer for some time in Lin- coln's Inn until he was appointed the first professor of English law in tlia Lniversity College of Wales. In that capacity he has acted as examiner in law to the University of Wales and the. University of Sheffield. He has not only made a comprehensive study of EingKsh law, but also of Fliglisli, politics, particularly in relation to Wales, and has earned a popular reputation as an effective platform speaker. In recent years I he was invited to become the Liberal candi- date in East Glamorgan, Swansea district, and Gower, where his services as lecturer and speaker were greatly appreciated. He has also taken prominent part in the meet ings of the National Free Church Council and has during the winter addressed many recruiting meetings mmmtmmmmmmmmmammm/memsxamKmmmmmmma———i

Family Notices

girths, Jflaxriages, anb Berths MARRIACES. Davies—Harries.—On the 2nd July at the Register Office, Aberayron, before lr. John M. Howell, registrar, James Davies, Pantgwyn, Llanarth. and Jane Harries, Rhosgoehfacrh. Llanarrh, Edmunds—Evans.—July 7th, at, Dyff'ryn, Merioneth, the Rev. T. Edmunds, Aberdare, formerly of Aberystwyth, and Miss Elizabeth Evans, Coedybachan. Williams—Lewis.—On the 2nd July, at tho Register Office, Aberayron, before Ah-. John M. Howell, registrar, Thomas Williams, Dyffryn Arth, Llanbadarn Trefeglwys. and Margaret Anne LPWJ-S. Pantycefn, Nantcwnlle. Morgan—Jones.—July 7th, at the C.M. Chapel, Brynmawr, Brecon shire, Mr D. J. Morganfi B.Se., s'on of the Re v Rhys Morgan, Llanddewi Bren, to Annie, eldest daughter of the late Mr. William Jones, J.P., Brynmawr. Edwards—Owen.—July 7th, at Shiloh, Abcrystwyth, Mr. Owen Edwards, coal merchant, 42, Cambrian-street, and Miss E. A. Owen, 5, North-road. DEATHS. Evans.—July 5th, Mr Richard Evans, nautical engineer, son of Mrs Evans, Bronafon, Borth-y-gest, aged 25. Fox.—June 25th, L fr. William Kox, Cnwch Coch, aged 64.' Griffith.-On the 2nd July, suddenly, at the Beacon Hotel, Crowborough Camp, William Newling Griffith, of Glyn- malden and Penmaen, Dolgelley. aged seventv-one. h178 Jones.—July 2nd, at 2, Powell-sfcreet, Aberystwyth, Mr. John Jones, aged < fifty-four. t

Advertising

r I Spring and Summer. DICKS for BOOTS. The three things Men and Women look for when choosing their Boots are Excellence of Design and Fitting Good Wearing Quality, and Reasonableness in Price. DICKS meet these demands so completely and effectually that it will pay every man and woman to visit their ESTABLISHMENTS AT 12, Great Darkgate St.(Neit oSo"Po" ABERYSTWYTH IB^gh Street, Pwllheli High Street, Barmouth High Street, Lampeter High Street, Cardigan High Street, Carmarthen Seymour Street, Newcastle Emlyn Lester House, Llandyssul I Penrallt Street, Machynlleth I Victoria Buildings, Dolgelley I Bank Place, Portmadoc V Bristol House, Aberayron I High Street, Festiniog ■ —i .t. -III:I.'I!IiIIi1 RO B BTS T ABlE AlE Per Imperial Pint. Supplied in Screw-Stoppered Bottles. A. wholesome Ale, strongly recommended for familv use. BOTTLED BY Dd ROBERTS & SONS, Ltd., BREWERS, ABERYSTWYTH- <>720 81M = Thomas Ellis & Co. SPECIALISTS IN BLOUSES, 9 Neckwear and Ladies' Lingerie. Terrace Road, Aberystwyth. j TEL. 61. Under Distinguished Patronage ESTABLISHED 1900. J. LEVENSON Begs to draw the attention of the Residents and Visitors to the Up-to-date Commodious Hairdressing Saloon Adjoining his HIGH-CLASS TOBACCO ESTABLISHMENT, TERRACE ROAD, First-Class Artists employed and prompt attention given. THE FAMOUS New Hudson Lightweight Motor Cycles, 2:1 h.p., 2 stroke, 2 speed. Price from R32 IN STOCK AT C, GRAY JONES, Garage, Aberd ovey EDWIN KAY, Landscape Specialist, Garden Designer, &c Rock Gardens, Water Gardens, Old English, and other forms of Gardening of highest quality carried out. Old Gardens renovated. Plants, Trees and Shrubs supplied at reasonable rate. Advice given. Heather Bank, Barmouth. •48 L 42, TERRACE ROAD, ABEKYSTWYTH, THE Shop for all kinds of BOOTS AND SHOES. At the Lowest Possible Prices, REPAIRS promptly and neatly done ob the premises with the best bark-tanned Leather. Printed by J. Gibcon, and Published by him in Terrace-road, Aboryatwyth, in tk* County of Cardigan; at Ll. Edwar" Stationer, High-atreeli, Bala; and JAX Evans and nephew, Stationers, Glaiiy** House, Barmouth, in the omaty P Merioneth: and at Darid Uaj9% rw& madoc, in the Ovutf of CkiHlWi Friday, July 9, 1915-

Advertising

lip anb Powtt the toast [Selected.] NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS. "RADICAL."—The reason is probably that the operations of governments do uot touch the common people for good or ill. Wise governments leave room for the people to move freely. "BITCHIN." There is no greater or purer pleasure than to feel that anyone has been helped by you. The best way to success is to do well the duty close at hand. I know your town somewhat. "A YOUTH. "Nothing is more difficult than to learn to think. There are men who have taken academic degrees who do not seem to have learnt to think. Most people are afraid to think—very much afraid-but if you really wish to learn to think you must be patient and be willing to listen to your own mind when it tells you things which you do not like. The mind at first does not speak loudlly, and you must listen very carefully..Besides, it is not easy to put what the mind says into words. Take the subject of life-a big subject. Try to put down all that you can think of about life. It is not likely that you can think of anything original about life, but what you want to do is to learn to think. Try to express what. ever comes into your mind and be patient. Get to know the meanings of the words which you meet with in reading or conversation. It is impos- sible to think accurately without understanding the names of things. You are probably much more ignorant about words than you think you are. It is one of the defects of modern I education that more care is taken in teaching children facts than how to think about them.

YEARS DO NOT MAKE US OLD

YEARS DO NOT MAKE US OLD. The zest for life is not decreased by years. I Nor is life's glory dimmed by all the tears Which flow from sorrow's never-failing springs, Nor by the shadow of death's sable wings. This earthly house, where life's brief game we play, Will slowly change and crumble to decay; But we shall live beyond the bounds of time, And with new strength the hills of glory climb. Age knows that grief however keen shall cease, And that from pain at last will come re- lease; The deepest wounds to healing time will yield, And what life's sorrows mean will be re- 1 vealed. Youth to the future looks for fuller joy- For richer life, for bliss without alloy; The oild have learnt that they must live to-day, And with memoric joys they grace the way. Life is not sweeter to the young than old, Nor does death nearer come as years are told; Youth takes alarm at every fleeting ill, Which age has learnt can neither maim I nor kill. Age is less apt than youth to sink in gloom— To see blank ruin in the future loom. Age knows that fancied ills when met are slain, And that our loss can be retrieved again. Age sees with backward glance the way it came, Each hidden pitfall and each vanished aim; Youth has no past, and views with strange alarm An that the future holds of loss or harm. BEAUTY. I have tried my best to impress upon local governing bodies that uniformity in archi- tecture is not beauty. What is wanted in houses in a town is variety—individuality —and not sameness. Long rows of houses all exactly the same are not beautiful be- cause they are the same. What is wanted is that. the people should be enabled to work their character into their houses. Who is to teach the average town coun- I cillor that multiplied ugliness can never become beautiful, however uniform it is? BEAUTY WAS NOT 3IORE OR LESS. A tiny dewdrop By the sunshine lit Sparkled, jewel-like, On a crimson leaf. The leaf, quivering fell, The. dewdrop's glory died, But still the wintry sun From out the stormy sky Gave promises of hope, And other dewdrops shone On other crimson leaves, Quivering in the wind. Earth's beauty was not more For this dewdrop's birth, Or less because it died j When the north wind blew, j And it fell to earth the crimson leaf To be seen no more Sparkling in the sun. GREAT DEEDS. George Eliot says somewhere that "no great deed is done by falterers who ask for certainty." This is true, but it is also true that it is impossible for any man to ten what deed is great or small. Perhaps somewhere there is waiting one who will take this message of George Eliot's and will make use of it—one to whom it will be seed. It was George Eliot who also said that all fruit is seed. It is the great need that makes the great deed, for no deed could be great if there were no need. It is a vain quest to seek for certainty. The test of man's power is his power to act in doubt and his willingness to abide by the consequences of his acts. Sometimes for a moment the veil is withdrawn and the secret glory is revealeJ. We speak of what we have seen, and almost before the sound of our voice has died away we doubt whether we saw or not. Great deeds! The man who remains in his own place and does the work close at hand does a greater deed than he who shirks common duties and common tasks in order to reach high place. The world is full of great self-sacrifice, of renunciation, of help, of devotion by obscure men and women of whom no record will be made, but wtiose greatness sweetens and glorifies the world. It may be that a great deed shall be handed down through twenty generations before ft shall bring fame to one doer of it. I WOULD NOT CARE. If I could take thy face in both my hands And gently kiss thy weary eyes In which a world of sadness lies- If I could touch thy face with mine And round thy form my arms entwine- I would not care for time's swift running sands, For love gives more than death can take To him who dies for love's sweet sake. WHO TV A-8 CAUGHT? I had no words to say, And so I kissed her; Alarmed, she fled away, Ah, how I missed her. My sprightly, sparkling pet, How long I sought her! And then-what will you bet 'Twas I who caught her ? OBSERVATIONS. Let him who labours in any cause waste no time in looking for fruits. After the seed is sown there are floods, frosts, scorching winds, draughts, and blights. It is but seldom that he who sows the seed joins with those who sing harvest home. Between seed-time and harvest there are dark, dreary, hopeless days and nights, lighted only by flickering hope. In moral and social life, as in physical life, it is not the fatal organic disease that always causes the greatest disturbance and attracts the most attention. It is that which is plainly seen and acutely felt, and not that which saps the life, that creates interest and alarm. To judge fairly of men's acts it is neces- sary to forget all your own relations to the men. When symbols are put for men then moral logic is unbiassed. A man's true worth grows out of his grave. The art of bearing a burden is, not to win compliments for your strength, but to be asked how it happens that you are less weighted than other men. The potential, unrevealed being in us, of which, in crises, glimpses are sometimes given, astonishes us quite as much as it astonishes other people. The world erects standards of measure, and refuses to acknowledge those who do not pass under them. Some men spend their lives in padding themselves so as to reach these standards. Life ceases to be a struggle when it is lived in obedience to the laws of the universe. It is those who have made sacrifices for wealth and fame who realize most keenly how it is not what a man has, but what he is, that makes all the difference. He to whom the poor look for redress possesses honour and power that kings can neither bestow nor take away. The man who knows himself to be un- worthy of trust is ruined and incapable of noble effort, although the public have not found him out A religion of fear will always breed cowards. If men, instead of trying to improve their circumstances, would try to improve themselves, the results would be more satisfactory in many ways. The man who only seeks that which he really needs is soon satisfied. It is he who imagines that other men's possession" con_ fer some joy he does not feel that is driven through the world a lustful victim of un- gratified desire. There is scarcely one man in ten thousand who knows what, adds real dignity to him. The Coast.

ABERYSTWYTH

ABERYSTWYTH Will.—Mr. Thomas Jenkins, 47, Great Dtarkgate-street, who difcd on December '26th left estate of the gross value of ( £ 1,135, or which the net personalty has been sworn at JE512. Drunkenness.-On Saturday morning before the. Mayor and Robert Doughton, Elsqrs., John Jones. 21, Portland-road, was charged by P.C. A. H. Jones with having been drunk and disorderly and \as fined 10s. Fair. — The monthly fair was held ou Monday when there was a small stock of cattle and prices appeared to have gone back a little. íearlilws fetched L9 to Lll, two year olds £ 11 to £ 13. cows and calves, JB15 to £ 18. There were but few horses. Pastorate. W. J. Clothier. B.A., B.D., of Tredegar, who has recently con- cluded h:s studies at the Theological Col- lege, Aberystwyth, has accepted a call to the pastorate of Gilfach Bargoed Caivm- istic Methodist Church, and ix-;il commence duties on August 1st. He obtained his B.D. degree last week, and is the first Bachelor of AiLs and Divinity produced by the Monmouthshire '(' Wales, headed by Major James, and .:1 se. ies of meetings will be held to recruit men for the 19th Pioneers and the Welsli Army Corps. The band of the Pioneers visited Aberystwyth on Tuesday, under the command of Major James and Lieut. Ixhvards and stayed for a few hours, hav- ing luncheon at Hotel 24, on the way to the headquarters at Conway. The band of the Cheshire Battalion billeted in Aber- ystwyth left on Saturday on a month's j recruiting tour. Appointment.—Nurse E. A. Morgan, 38, Greenfield-street, daughter of the late Mr John Morgan and of Mrs. Morgan, has been appointed assistant nurse at the Ber- rington Infirmary, Salop. ) Franca-British Concert. Next Wednes- ) day evening a Franco-British patriotic concert will be held in the Pavilion^ under the patronage of the Mayor' and Corpora- tion and of Colonel H. Stott and officers of the Cheshire Battalion. Next Wednes- day is the French national day, and the proceeds of the concert wilt be in aid of the French Red Cross\Pund. It is expedited that the concert will be well supported in appreciation of the valiant efforts of the French people against the common enemy, COUNTY SCHOOL GOVERNORS, Tuesday, July 6th. — Present: Mr. C. M. Williams, chairman; Professor Morgan Lewis, \he Rev. R. J. Rees, Mrs. Griffith, Captain D. James, Mr. Daniel Thomas. Mr. John Evans (clerk), and Mr. D. Samuel (headmaster). Resignation.—Miss B. ( Jones, physical instructress at the College, sent in her resignation as instructress ait the School and it was accepted. Mr. W. J. Pugh, temporary assistant master, wrcite that he had been awarded a university research studentship in geology tenable for two years at the College and would have to give up his position at ltlie School to taka advantage of it. He expressed his regret at having to resign lÙ; position as he had been very happy during tile, short time he bad been connected with the School. Entrance Scholarship. The Governors awarded scholarships or free places of the value of J35 each to the following who. out of forty-one candidates, were successful in the 1915 examinations;—John Gwesyn Edwards, Rhydypennau C. Gwyneth Pick- ard, Alexandra-road C. Percy Jenkins, do. William Owen Williams, Llancynfelin C.; David John Jones. Aberystwyth N., Arthur ap Gwynn, Alexandra-road C.; Gwyneth Edwards, Penllwyn C.; Gwladys Evelyn Mary Jones, Alexandra-road C.; Annie 01 wen Morgan, Mefenydd C. of E.; Annie Mary James, Alexandra-road C., Sydney William Ellis Roberts. Aberyst- wyth N. Glyn Owen and Maude Gwen- doline Mapp, Alexandra-road C. The candidate at the head of the Est had 190 marks out of a maximum of 200 in arith- metic and English and the last successful candidate on the list 115 out of 200. The lowest candidate in the list of forty-ono bad twenty marks only Olíf of a maximum of 200. Internal Scholarships.—It was resolved on the recommendation of the Headmastei to renew scholarships to Dorothy Ellis, Taliesin; James D. Joseph, Prospect- strceh: Gildes Tibbott, Tottenham House; David John Davies, Blue Gardens: T. E. D. Edwards, Dolcniw; Eleanor A. Lewis, High-street; Eunice May Stephens. Erglodd; Idwal Lewis, Portland-street Arthur James Smith, Greenfield-street; Henry Lloyd Jenkins, Buarth Hvwela Saer. Alexandra-road School; Ernest Puch, Taliesn: J. Reginald Edwards, Taliesin; Kenneth Jenkins. Quebec Villa; G. Gwyneth Richards, Devil's Bridge; Katie Muriel Jones, Llanfarian Catherine W inifred Isaac. Tabesin Aled Llew Evans, Glamafon-terrace; Ivor David Morgan. Taliesin: Blodwen Morgan, Glanfread; D. Edwin Williams, Borth; Benjamin Alfred Edwards, Llanbadarn Gertrude Owen Loveden-road; Glynne Ellis. South-road; Lizzie Chamberlain, Smithfield-road; Anna Mar a Jones, R.uel; W. Glynne Davies, Blaeitplwyf Olga Jones. South Gate: Har- old Edwards, Penparke; Annie Emily F. ancis. Alexandra-road Charles Basil Jones, Borth; Marian Jones. Bachyrhew; Einrvs Evan D. James. Buarth Winifred M. R ees, Gogerddan-cottage* Thomas J. N< ruhwcod, Penglaise-road: and J. W. S Griffiths. Llanbadarn. Internal scholar- ships were renewed for Edward Rhys Harries,. South-road: Winifred Davies, Trevor-road; Katherine Muriel iRees. Rhos; and Gwladys Jane Jones. Claraeli. New internal scholarships were awarded to Frances Mary Beanie, South-road; David Husrhes. Taliesin: David Llewelyn Jones. Borth; and Valmau Bordwood Evans. North-road.

DOLGEXLaEY

DOLGEXLaEY. Forthcoming Marriage. An engage- ment is announced between ( orris William Evans, second-lieutenant, 7'th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment, son of Mr. William Evans. C.B.. late of the Board of Trade, and Phvllis Gertrude Bowen, daughter of Veie Douglas Campbell and Mrs. Camp- boll. and granddaughter of the late Hugh Campbell, M.D. r • r n *■ Rainfall.—The gaugings of rainraK at LUllfrion Gardens, made by Mr Brewer, show that for the month of June 1.84 inch of rain fell. Rain fell on eight days, the highest gauging being .50 on the 24th. War Loan.—Local Oddfellows have J11- vested £500 in the new war loan, and the ngci Aiding Friendly Glasdif Mine.—Work at Glasdir Copper 3line, which gave employment to about 100 men, been completely suspended, and the machinery has been forwarded to Anglesey. Scholastic.—Mr. R. O. Davies (son of the Rev. Owen Duvies, GanJIwyd), who matriculated to Aberystwyth three years ago, has been awarded a scholarship of £ 54' in agriculture. Mr. Richard Jones, Brouaboi another student at Aberystwyth, has had his scholarship increased from £10 co £15. Both are old boys of the Dot gelley Chunty School.—Mr. John H. Pugh, Trefeilian, has graduated with first-class honours at Bangor. Naval Promotion. Lieutenant-com- mander E. A Cunningham, son of Prof. Cnnni¡¡rltam dinbnrgh, has been pro- moted commander of H.M.S. Scorpion, which has accomplished deeds of ^9^ the Dardanelles, including the checking of a Turkish assault. He is a nephew of Mir, vies Froheulog. ur?t tm* chairman); Di. donn j0IieSj Morgan, Edwaid *'• p rrV John R. Davies, A. E. Hughes, H Paliy Jones. R. C. Evans. J. Jones with Mr. R. Barnett, clerk; and Mr. R. Edwards, surveyor. The Brewery. Tb-. Surveyor submitted an estimated cost ^of repairing the disused Brewe^ which had been offered tor sale_ to Council for £ 425.-In reply to tlie ice Chairman, the Surveyor stated that the house was literally not ht. The walls weie damp in consequence of the ^eing untenanted for many years.-The Chair- man said he had received a petition signed bv seventeen householders protesting, as ratepayers, against the proposed purchase by the Council.-Mr. A. E. Hughes pro- posed that in view of the report submitted bv the Surveyor the Council proceed to purchase the premises as it would be more economical eventually as a property of the Council at £425 than paving 20 per; num rent as at present. )\ 0 addition would bp made to the rates and the house could be rented. There was always opposi- tion in some quarters when a new project was mooted.—Mr. Rees Morgan seconded the proposition and said it was a suitable place for the Council.—Mr. H. Parry Jones proposed that the Council should not purchase the premises. Sctores of people had approached him to protest against the idea cf purchasing Caemarian was now the property of the Council and should JÑ uti'.ised as such.—Mr. A, E. Hughes There are only seventeen signat- ures against the purchase.— Mr E. Evans seconded the admendment that the Coun- cil do not purchase the property.—The Clerk It is somewhat insulting to have a proposition and amendment. Let the lat- ter he a diiect negative.—Dr. John Jones said that personally he did not think it prudent to purchase the property in the present national crisis. Scores of rate- payers had been to him protesting against the proposed purchase.—Mr. J. R. Davies concurred. —Mr. Rees Morgan: The offer is an ideal one and the property will prove a valuable :'sset to the Council.—Mr. H. Parry Jones pointed out that it was too far away from the town to suit the pur- pose as an electric light station. Caemarian would be infinitely better.—-Mr. J. Jones Williams: But it must be borne in mind that Caemarian was primarily intended for the holding of markets and fairs, not for the erection of huidings-Mr R. C. Evans: "Whether electric lighting locally becomes an accomplished fact or not, the old Brewery will be an acquisition to the town. The engines there can be sold and the pur- chase money will pay for repairs. It was a noteworthy fact that the people of Dol- gelley were averse to any enterprise and had a holy horror of speculation. They preferred arguments in street corners rather than study hard facts and figures. If the property was at present outside the Council's houndary, application had been made for an extension of the boundary. He was positive that the Council would never regret purchasing the premises which would in a few years time prove a profit- able investment. -Messrs. A. E. Hughes, Rees Morgan, R. C. Evans, and J. Jones Will ams voted in favour of buying the premises and the Chairman, Vice-Chairman Dr John Jones, Edward Evans, E. E. Jones, J. R. Davies, H. Parry Jones, dis- approved of the proposal, which was there- fore lost.

CARDIGANSHIRE MAIN ROADS

CARDIGANSHIRE MAIN ROADS. SOUTHEiRN COMMITTEE. The quarterly meetinp- was held at Xew Quay on Wednesday. There were present Mr. Thomas Evans. Llandugwydd, chair- man; the Revs. T. Arthur Thomas, Daniel Evans, Messrs. W. Jeremy, Thos. Davies, Troedvraur; D. Jones, Llangranog; Joseph Evans, Llanfair; Jenkvn Thomas, New Quay; E. Morris Jones, Llanon; R, Evans. Llangoedmore; Griffith Davies. Penbryn; John Davies, E. Lima Jones and John M. Howell, Aberayron; John Jones, Felinfach E. J. Davies, New Quay the Rev. W. Griffiths, Llanllwchaiarn: Jenkyn Davies, Llansilio; the Rev. J Williams. Cardigan; B.. X,. Davies, Aber porth; EVan Evans, clerk; Ivor Evans, deputy clerk; and D. Davies, surveyor. The summary and estimate of £ 1,300 for the ensuing quarter were received It was resolved to defer consideration of the expenditure of L6,CW on the Cardigan IÓ) Cenarth road, agreed to be advanced by the Road Board for three months. It was, however, decided that the pot holes be filled with chips and tar. It was reported that the improvement of the road at Manorafon, and the widen ing of the road at Aberarth, had been satisfactorily carried out. The work at Rhydybeillen Bridge was progressing: Permission was granted to Mr. Jones, Pwllmelyn, Blaenporth, 'to fence a pond on the roadside. The Cbmmittee appointed to inspect and to report on dangerous curves on tha Lam- peter to Tregarcn road was convened on the 19th June. Mr. Inglis Jones met them at Olmarch, and was willing to give the required land for widening and improving the road and straightening the curves. It was resolved to proceed with the work and bo thank Mr. Inglis Jones. It was agreed to pay the promised contri- bution and the proportion of the extra f;6 for the work done at Ddolwen Bridge in Cardigan district. In view of the restriction of loans owing to the war the proposed new bridge at Rhyd. near Aberayron, was deferred. In the meantime, the Rev. W. Griffiths and the Surveyor were asked ito arrange with Mr. James Evans, one of the landlords on the spot, as to the land required for the purpose of straightening the curve, in anticipation of the time when the work already sanctioned by the Finance Com- mittee will be taken in hand. Lampeter Rural Council having resolved to erect a bridge at Capel St. Silin aIt, a cost of JB190 applied for the usual contri- bution of one third from the County .y Council. Mr. E. Lima Jones proposed an view of the call for retrenchment owing to the war, that the contribution should not be granted. For a thousand years they have gone on without ithe bridge, and he held that it was not the time to undertake work which could be done without. Mr. John M. Howell proposed that the usual contribution .should be made. Rural Councils might. be relifcd on to exercise economy. When a ruiral. council com- posed chiefly of farmers had deliberately agreed to undertako two-third of the cost- the Courfry Council might surely assist with one third. Mr. John Jones, Cwmero, seconded Mr. Howell's proposition, and said the work should not be delayed. The Rev. Damiel Evans said ha was SOL v he could not support Mr. Howell and seconded Mr. E. Lima Jones. On a division, the grant was refused. A sub-committee recommended :hat a sum not exceeding t20 should be expended to build a protectine wall at Nantderi. The landlord was willing to give the required land. Mr J. M. Howell, proposed that the recommendation should be: adopted, though the people apparently had been without it for a thousand years. (Laughter.) Mr. E. Lima Jones. seconded the pro- po ition, remarking that it was for the protection of the public. The proposition was carried. The terms of the landlord for the acquisition of a strip of land for \the purpose of the proposed widening at Llandy.ssul wli(jh worked out (remarked the Rev. T. A. Thomas), a!t about £1,2010 an acre, were considered prohibitive. If a projecting barn close by could be acquired, a great improvement would b" affected. The Rev. T. A. Thomas, was authorized to negotiate and to report. The Road Beard applied for the services of roadmen for urgent road work in Pem- brokeshire, at the request of the Military Authorities. The Surveyor was authorized to render what assistance he could. lr. D. J. Morgan, B.Sc., county agricultural organizer, appealed for leave for roadmen to assist in harvesting oper- ations for It wo days a week. The Rev. John Williams proposed that leave should not be granted. The Committee must draw the line somewhere. Bearing in mind the wretched stake of many of their roads, they could not in addition to the leave already given, afford to allow more roadmen to leave work. Mr. Jeremy seconded the proposition; but on a division leave was gi\'pn.