Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
Advertising

jtMjj on n ntr dMnTMn mam ESTABLISHED 1854. DAVID TITUS WILLIAMS BOOEBINDBR, Etc, I SHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and ro-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. I I tlViø & Claw All- (glass fjpiiiwfS, dtotttdish Douse. 41 Kirig St-pect, GaFmepfeheH I A. H- STOODLEY, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. All Business will receive my Personal Attention. ) 1I8CR'ilN-¡ WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WOBK GUARANTEED -&T JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, OARMARTHEN. Established 1336. The Welshman's Favourite. lo JMABON Sauce $As good as its Name. I DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. V S Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Peter St., Cardiff. J ^XXXXX\\XXV\XX\\X\X\\XX\VAXXX\\S WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THB CHOICEST DESIGNS CABDS AND PRICES SUITABLE FOR ALL CLASSES W. S. MoRitis, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, O.A. R, Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST ABERGWILI THE ANNUAL will be held at the above place on SHOW & RACES THURSDAY, AUGUST 26th, 1915. ————— Numerous Classes for ————— FLOWERS, POULTRY, DOGS etc., etc. Cups and Medals. 125 Classes. ENTRIES CLOSE AUGUST 19, 1915. For Shedules apply to- T. D. DEMPSTER, Dolgwih, Carmarthen. ALL PROFITS TO VARIOUS RELIEF FUNDS. YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a Safe and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists, 4s Gd i RK f'Sl per box, or sent direct, post free, 11 for Sixty Penny Stamps by the o4;l P1LLIS £ S £ !9 £ £ & <» CARMARTHENSHIRE. VALUABLE PITWOOD FOR SALE. Growing on Forest-fach Farm, near Kidwelly, in the Paris of Llangendeirne. TENDERS ARE INVITED for the following Lots:— LOT I.-About 4b Acres of well-grown Pitwood, chiefly Larch, and numbered 2,301 on Ordnance Sheet. Boundary trees not to be sold. LOT 2 —About 3a. Or. Wp of well-grown Pitwood, chiefly Larch, and numbered 2,302 on Ordnance Sheet. Boundary trees not to be sold. Mr Jones, Forest-fach Farm, will show the Lots. The Trees are of excellent quality, and convenient- ly situated to roads, important Collieries and Railway Stations. Tenders to be sent to Mr G. GRIFFITHS, Surveyor and Estate Agent, Maeayffynon, Llandilo, on or before August 31st, 1915. The lowest or any Tender will not necessarily be accepted. August 10th, 1915. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE "REPORTER. No. of One Three Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. d a d s d 20 1 0 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 3 6 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 5 6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and "To be Sold by Private Treaty," clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWRENCE, at Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressed to the Reportet Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are sent. HOUSE TO BE LET at Michaclmas; No. 19 Spilman Street, Carmarthen.—Enquiries to Mrs Jones, 30 Quay Street. IN MEMORIAM CARDS—We have a large and assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit all clastses,-Repoi-ter Office, Carmarthen. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. VISITING CARDS from Is 6d for 50; Printed on Ivory Cards.—Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WANTED-A LAD; Good Prospect.—Lipton, Carmarthen. WEDDING CARDS—Prices and styles .to suit all Classes. Speciment Book, containing the Latest and Choicest Designs, sent on application.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WRITING PAPER AND ENVELOPES. Large quantity always in Stock.—Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WANTED, a clean, respectable woman as CARETAKER of the English Baptist Church. Applications to be sent to Mr Fred James, Leicester House, Secretary. WfANTED, an ERRAND BOY; full time. v Apply, Reporter, Carmarthen. WANTED, Board-Residence for two gentlemen, TT during first ten or fourteen days of September, in or near CarmaiVnen; Two Bedrooms, Sitting room and attendance. —State inclusive terms to, A.B.C. Reporter Office, Carmarthen. BMSHES

CorrcpoudepceI

Corrc&poudepce. WOMEN S COUNTY AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE. To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Beporter. Si,r,-Having seen in your issue of last week an account of the quarterly meeting of the Carmarthenshire Chamber of Agriculture which was held on the 4th August, and at which meeting Miss La Mot-he, adviser to the Women's Labour Department Board of Trade, and Miss Straehan, of the Cardiff Labour Ex- change. Welsh Division, spoke on the ques- tion of Women's Labour on Farms. I thought it, might interest your readers to know that these ladies visited several centres in the county that week, such as St. Clears, Whit- land. Llanelly and Llandilo. and that as a result of their visit a. committee has been formed consisting of the following ladies, to which others will shortly be added from other districts :—Mrs Gwynne Hughes, b,. Llandilo; Mrs Harries. Drysllwynfawr, Llan- ii-thney Mrs Evans, Glassallt, Llangadock; Miss Ilees, Glanyrafonddu. Llandilo; Miss Phillips, Green-bill, Carmarthen; Mr D. Francis, auctioneer, C-,irmathen-to whom anyone requiring women and girls for work- ing on farm can apply for information. I p This committee will receive regular lists .)f applicants seeking work on farms and will be able to supply all details as to capabilities age, wages, etc.. and would recommend the the most suitable ones in each case. The Committee have now a'waiting list of some 25 women and girls all suitable for farm work, some fully trained in milking, dairy work, poultry and pig feeding, etc., some par- itally trained and some untrained willing to learn. Wages will vary according to training and capacity. I might mention that several of these women and girls have been trained at Agricultural Colleges receivng grants from the Board of Education. Gardeners also pro- vided. It is felt that with the present shortage of hands on the farms and the need the country has of an increased production of food stuffs. a greater use could be made of female labour on the land and that as a, supply of such laJbour is forthloming the experiment should be made and if proved satisfactory would go far to solving the labour question, and also serve to release a number of young men still kept on the farms who could go to join their bro- thers and comrades who have no nobly re- sponded to the call of their King and Country and I should like to see Carmarthenshire gilving a lead in the employment of women on farms and in gardens. Yours truly, BEATRICE GAVYXNE HUGHES. Tregeyb, LI-andilo, Aug. 16th, 1915.

DUKE OF NORFOLKS NATTOXAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF IN BELGIUM

DUKE OF NORFOLK'S NATTOXAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF IN BELGIUM. To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Reporter- Sir,—I have much pleasure in acknowledg- ing the following subscriptions to the above Fund:— £ s. d. Brought forward 14 15 6 Mrs Harris, Bryntowy, Carmarthen 1 0 U Miss Harris, Bryntowy 0 10 0 Captain W. Roberts, Llandilo 2 0 0 Mr George Henfrey, Tregeyib 2 2 0 Col. Gwynne-HugheSi, Glancothi 1 1 0 Rev J. John, Llanstepban 0 10 U Three Sympathisers, Golden Grove 0 5 0 Members Llancennen C.M. Chapel, Maesybont, per Mr D. W. Stephens, Capel Farm 1 0 0 Members Sunday School Capel Evan, Cilrhedyn, per Mr Thos. Davies, Cit- waunydd fawr, Newcastle Emlyn 2 3 0 Mrs Anne Jones, Rhoslyn Villa, Llandilo, per Editor "Welshman" 0 2 6 Yours faithfully, J. W. GWYNNE HUGHES. Lord Lieutenant County of Carmarthen. Tregeyb, Llandilo, 15th August, 1915.

MAYORS BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND

MAYORS BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND. Water Street Cliapel, tl5 English Congregational Church, t4 Parish of St, Peter's, t4. Tabernacle Chapel, £2. Bethaniia Chapel, £1.

MAYORS NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF IX BELGIUM

MAYOR'S NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF IX BELGIUM. 14th August, 1915. Dear Sirs.—On behalf of our Committee please allow me to congratulate you most heartily on the splendid result of your first collections (£50). You have certainly made a fine beginning, and we sincerely hope that your benevolent efforts will result in steady subscriptions throughout the winter. I am sending you samples of the new leaf- lets wliiiclh we have just published, and bhall be glad to send you a supply of these free of cost if you care to have them. Again with very many thanks for all you arc doing. I am, yours faithfully, (Signed) W. A. M. GOODE, Hon. Secretary. The War Relief Committee, Carmarthen. The Editor of the "Cairmarthen Weekly Reporter" begs to acknowledge the receipt of 8s. on behalf of "J. G., Uttoxeter," which has been forwarded to the Mayor on behalf o the Belgians, At Home Fund.

Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble

Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble. FREE TREATMENT. Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is mostly the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel and dropsy. The success of Estora Tablets for the treatment of rheumatism and other forms of kidney trouble, is due to the fact that they restore the kidneys to healthy action, and thereby remove the cause of the trouble, which necessarily removes the ill-effects that spring from it, and have curred numberless cases after the failure of all other attempted remedies, which accounts for them fast superseding out-of-date medicines that are sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. To prove Estora Tablets full warrant their descrip. tion -an honest lemedy at an honest price—one full box of 40 tablets will be sent to readers of the "Carmarthen Weekly Reporter" as a free sample on receipt of this notice and 3d in stamps to cover postage, packing, etc. Sold by chemists, Is ld per box of 40 tablets or 6 boxes for (is. For full box sample, address Estora Co., 132 Charing Cross Road, London, W.C.

AUGUST FAIRS

AUGUST FAIRS. 7. Llanboidy. 10. Llandovery, Sennybridge (sheep), Tal- garth, Haverfordwest. 11. NOT berth, Aberayroii. 12. Carmarthen, Knighton, Hay. 13. Carmarthen, Llanfynydd. 16. Llandilo Bridge, Swansea, Lampeter. 17. Maenclocliog, Whitland. 19. Cbnwil. 20. Newcastle Emlyn, Cilycwm. 21. C'aio. 23. Llandilo. 30. Llandilo.

K1DWLLLY NOTES

K1DWLLLY NOTES. St. Teilo's annual Sunday School treat took j place at the Velindre field (kindly lent by Mr John Thomas) on Wednesday, A ug ust lltli. As an" encourageme nt to attend Sunday School regularly, and as an inducement to increase the membership of the St. To.lo s Sunday School, Davies, the Plough, gave a treat on the above date, including a tea and prizes for the sports. Including a few friends invited by the donor, in all 80 persons 1 sat at table to partake of the delicious tilings provided. In the midst of very inclement weather, the afternoon turned out to be very fine, thus enabling all to partake of the sumptuous repast in the open. According to the unanimous "testimony of all, the treat was a great success. This was mainly due to the extreme generosity of Mrs Davies, who is never so happy as when she is doing good. The deepest thanks of Church people are due to her for the interest she has shewn. ••• A striking and warm-hearted welcome was I accorded Private Luther Jenkins, 1st Welsh Regiment, and son of Mr and Mrs Griff. Jenkins. Arlais Farm, on his return to Kid- welly on Monday evening the 16th inst. for a short furlough to recuperate after having been dangerously wounded in the left shoulder and side in one of the desperate encounters on the now famous Hill 60. Pte. Jenkins had been in hospital at Clevedon for over three months and was only discharged on the day of his home coming, Arriving by the 6.30 p.m. train the gallant fellow was received on the platform by his father, brothers and sis- ters, who, needless to state, greeted him with affectionate cordiality. The Mayor, Ald. T. Reynolds, and others, were also present, and hearty handshakes and expressions of welcome home assured the hero of the genuine delight which his return home occasioned. At the station gates a motor car, lent by Mr F. Sheippard and driven by Mr Harold Reynolds, the Mayor's only son, was awaiting, and Pte. Jenkins entered it amidst loud cheers from the huge crowd of citizens outside the station precincts. Other occupants of the car were the father of the wounded soldier, and the Mayor and Mayoress. The Mayor in a very Appropriate address extended on behalf of the citizens of Kidwelly a most cordial welcome home to the gallant soldier who had gone forth at the call of duty to do battle for King and Country. He had faced the greatest terrors, but had happily been spared to visit his home again, although he had been severely wounded When he (the Mayor) heard that Pte. Jenkins was due home on the 16th he resolved that his home coming should be worthy of the tradi- tions of the ancient borough of Kidwelly, and he had the hearty co-operation of all whom he consulted in making these somewhat hurried preparations (applause). Pte. Jenkins was the first of Kitchener's Army who had re- turned to the front to Kidwelly, and the re- ception accorded him that night would, he be- lieved be given to every one of Kidwelly's eons whose good fortune it would be to return (applause). He understood that other men who had been fighting in France had returned to the town, but he had had no knowledge of it at the time, otherwise he would have seen that their jariivql home did not pass unnoticed (applause). He hoped the young men who had not yet responded to the country's call would soon follow the example of their returned hero (cheers). A procession headed by the lown xranci, conducted !by Mr John Thomas, was then formed, the boys of the Castle School proudly bearing flags in honour of one of the old "beys" being immediately in front of the motor car in which Pte. Jenlkins sat between the Mayor and Mayoress. Behind followed the general public in vast numbers. Coun- cillors Henry W ilk ins and J. Morgan (W atei street) rendered valuable assistance in mar- shalling and controlling the procession which passed along Station road and West End, the houses of which displayed flags and bunting. A halt was made at the Pelican Square, and speeches were delivered by the Mayor, Rev E. J. Herbert, who also read some specially com- posed stanzas, Mr D. 0. Jones, who, at the special request of Pte. Jenkins, read some stirring verses which had been composed by a Canadian soldier in the trenches, the Rev H. R. Jones, Ooun. John Harries, Castle Farm, Coun. J. Morgan (Priory street), and Coun. Edmund Cole. Mr Jaimes Jones (Perenog) and C'oun. Harries (Castle) recited stanzas of welcome of their own composition. Hen Wlad fy Nhadau, the solo being taken by Mr W. J. Mansel, and God save the King, Mr Gwilym Thomas rendering the solo, were sung with great fervour, and the procession moved on through gaily decorated streets, lined with spectators smiling welcomes and waving handkerchiefs. Ferry road, leading to the hero's home, was exceptionally well decorated being spanned by numerous garlands, the whole presenting a veritable feast of colour. Amidst rousing cheers the, car entered the farmyard, where the modest hero briefly re- turned thanks for the magni,ficent rece)ption accorded him, remarking that if he had to go back to fight the foe he would do so with a brave heart, and if he had his way not one of the cruel Bosches would be alive (cheers). A few friends, including the Mayor and the

K1DWLLLY NOTES

Mayoress, were invited to join the family party at Arlais, and the healths Of the re- turned soldier, his parents and the other mem- bers of the family, were heartily drunk and suitable responses were made. Ill rough out the celebrations from the railway stat'on up to the Arlais Farm, P.S. J. W. Johns exer- cised admirable discretion, and the proceed- ings parsed off without a hitch. #*» There will be a distribution of Red C:o-s to successful members of the elis-i at the Castle School to- morrow (Saturday) evening at 7.30. and a pre- sentation will also be made to Dr T. 11. Griffiths, the instructor of the class. Those interested in Red Cross work are invited to attend the meeting;. A very able sermon was prea hed to a large congregation at St. Mary's Parish Church on 9 Sunday evening last by the Rev W. J. Jones. B.A., curate of Cyfarthfa, and a native of Kidwelly.

Advertising

Spinal Trouble and Wasting. Helpless Child Completely Cared by Dr. Cassell's Tablets Mm. Watkin. 37, Fxlw aid-street. llf.csU', lfiiM, eajs-: "I thill never cease to prait'-e Dr. Ca-tU'c Tablets for the cure they effected in my little Gladys. £ he used to J suffer dreadfully with! stomach pains sutdl violent headache, and cli,, ete c-o little that she wasted away to a little frame of bones. tihe w,,ii Y(.ry nervoes, too. and would wake screaming with terror. Then she went quite .leipie^s, lost all power. I had to carry her up and down stairs. We were advioed to take her to hospital, as it was spiral trouble she had. This we did. but as the treatment did not belJefit (31adn; we had her home ftirnin, and commenced giving Dr. CasrsellV Tablets. She improved wonderfully, soon she could walk a little, and so it went on till she was Quite cured. She is now seven and ever GO bright and active." Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Dr. Cassell's Tablets are a ppntiine and tested remedy for all forms of nerve or bc-dily weaVnefe in old or j-onng. ComponnoNl of nerve-nutri>. nts and tonics of indisputably proved efficacy, they aie the recognised nudem home treatment for NERVOUS BREAKDOWN NERVE PARALYSIS SPINAL PARALYSIS INFANTILE PARALYSIS NEURASTHENIA NERVOUS DEBILITY SLEEPLESSNESS AN/EMIA KIDNEY DISEASE INDIGESTION STOMACH DISORDER MAL-NUTRITION WASTING DISEASES PALPITATION VITAL EXHAUSTION PREMATURE DECAY Specially val'rtNe for Nursing- Mothers, and during the Critical Pericdn of T/ife. Chemists and stores in all parts d the world sMl Dr. Cn.-Mii's Tablets Prices: 10'jd.. l/l'-id., and 2/9-the 2/9 size being the most economical. A Free Trial Supply will be Mint to you on reo?ipt of name :nd address and two penny stamps for postage and packing. Addrew: Dr. p..eN', Co., Ltd., 413, Cheeter-road, Manchester.

General John Regan and the Z5 Old Oak

"General John Regan" and the Z5 Old Oak." THE GROWTH OF A MYTH. Readers of Geo. A. Birmingham know the story of "General John Regan." An American comes to a little town in the West of Ireland and enquires whether they have a statue to General John Regan, the founder of the Republic of Bolivar, and a native of tti-pt town. The villagers had never before heard of Bolivar or of General John Regan, but the'' pretend they do. Relatives of the deceased general arc- produced, and a rno.t-neiit is set on foot to provide the monument. Beiore the business has been in hand for a weei", the villagers all bolieve it. The plot ;s we i wi.rked out. We have .something of the same sort in Carmarthen. It is President Adams of the United States and the Old Oak. Both are hoaxes. »*» Paragraphs have been going the round again about the Id Oak. One paragraph stated that the younger shoot of the Old Oak is decaying, and that there was a "rumour" that the town of Carmarthen will fall when the Old Oak falls. Then the snowball started. In its latest development the prophesy is said to be due to Merlin. Merlin is said to have stated that "When the Old Oak shall tumble down Then shall fall Carmarthen town." The Old Oak is also stated to have been planted by Mr Adams. a master at the Car- marthen Grammar School, who was an ances- tor of President Adams, of the United States. • TheTe are so many knots in this rope that it is a slow job to unpick them separately. First of all the oak referred to is not the Old Oak at all. Spurrell's History of Carmar- then apparently refers to the Old Oak as dead. The history was published in the year 1879. I saw the Old Oak in the year 1892. It was then dead and nobody denied it was dead. The Corporation in 1893 authorised the Sur- vey-or to build a dwarf wall round the stump and to fill it up with cement in order to keep the stump in its place. If anylbody cares to search the Corporation minutes he will doubt- less find the resolution. I was at the meeting. The late Mir Henry Cadle was Mayor, Mr H. M. Thomas was Town Clerk, and Mr John Morgan was Surveyor. I believe it was the late Councillor Daniel Jones who brought the matter forward. Nobody pretended that it was anything but a measure to preserve the dead stump of an historic tree. ••• About that time the Corporation was plant- ing trees1. The limes which are now so bushy on Picton terrace were planted before that- albout 1887. But the trees which are to be found in various other streets were all planted between 1895-1898. There was a. keen public appetite for trees at the time. During the four years of the Mayoralty of Mr H. Brunei White (now Town Clerk) trees were planted in every suitable spot about the town. During this period a young oak sapling was planted beside the stump of the Old Oak. It was planted outside the dwarf wall—about six feet from it. It was obtained from a nursery for the purpose. I remember writing a para- graph aibout the planting of the young tree. The Young Oak has grown well during the last twenty years and was last summer a healthy tree about eight feet high. But by no stretch of imagination can an independent young tree on its own roots be called a "younger shoot" of the Old Oak because it happens to be in the same neighbourhood. One might as well ciall one of the lime trees in Picton teirraoe a younger shoot of one of the famous limes in "Unter den Linden." It is not far to Priory street. let anybody go up and see for himself. Most people I fancy are prepared to believe the evidence of their own eye, ••• I want to make a remark or two about John Adams, one of the early Presidents of the United States of America. A good deal of misdirected ingenuity has been wasted in an effort to prove that. he was born in Carmar- thenshire and attended the Carmarthen Grammar School. The method of proceeding in such cases as very simple. You start with your conclusion and then hunt for evidence to back it up. Any evidence which does not fit the conclusion is rejected, and anything tending to support the conclusion is accepted without demur. It has been proved that there was a John Adams at the Carmarthen Grammar School in the year 1780. This is lal right so far as it goes. But John Adams, the President, was born in the year 1735, and it is unlikely that he left America—where he seems to have been busy in the year 1770 or thereabouts—in order to attend the Carmarthen Grammar School at the mature age of 45. As a matter of fact John Adams who was one of the signatories of the Declaration of Independence was born at Braintree in New England1. His family left Devonshire in the year 1632. The statement that the original Old Oak was planted by Mr Adams, a master at the Carmarthen Grammar School and an ancestor of President Adams is of course an off-shoot of the other tale. All this of course is the work of people who fancy that the modern Welsh family names "John," "Williams," "Rees," "Adams" are clan names. In Scotland and Ireland, names like "McDonald," "Campbell," and Fraser," like "O'Neil," "McCarthy," and "O'Donnel" have been handed down from father to son for six or seven hundred years, and each person of the same name is related (though distantly to every other)—just like members of the twelve tribes of Israel. But the hilstory of Welsh nomenclature is quite different. If you search through wills or old documents you find that until quite recently sons were distinguished by the Christian names of their fathers. Thus a man was called "Rees Thomas." You will find that his son William is called "William Reesi." His son Joshua is called "Joshua Wiltiamig. The latter has a son called James and he is name "James Joshua." The son of James Joshua is perhaps called Evan James. His son is called Thomas Evans. Rees-ap-Thomas is merely a name on the principle of Simon-bar-Jonah. The "Ap" is dropped after a bit, Ibut the principle remains. The Welsh got guyed about their "Aps" and dropped them in the same tide of Anglicisation which turned Mr O'Riley into Mr Riley and Mr MoGuiuness into Mr Guinness. At an early stage, Rocs the son of Thomas was called Rees-ap-Tliomas. At a later stage such a man would be called Rc-cs Thomas. About the years 1770-182G Welsh surnames became fixed. In the middle oi the eighteenth century you beg;n to find that the son of Rees Thomas is called John Thomas and the son of -John Thomas was David Thomas. The names tend to become stereotyped after that time. The boy "John Adams" who attended the Carmarthen Grammar School may have been a son of Adam Morgan, who was the son of Morgan Rees. The son of "John Adams" may have been called Thomas John. Names are wor-e than useless in tracing Welsh pedi- grees unless you understand the principle. Some great families had fixed names tirree or fou.r centuries ago but others had not fixed their names until early in the nineteenth cen- tury. The prevalence oi R'blVal names in Wales is ,110 proof 'that the Aueient Britons are the descendants of the Ten Lost Tribes. It results from the fact that the Welsh are a Bible-reading nation and named their chil- dren after the Id Testament patriarchs and Christian Apostles, So much for Adams. *>;•* It is about time we turn our attention to Merlin. Merlin is one of the characters in the Arthurian legend, being a famous magi- cvan of miraculous birth. The stories relate to the period when the Christian Britons Hero struggling against the heathen Saxons from Germany (sav 550-850). It is assumed that Carmarthen (in W elsli Caerfyrddin) means the "Caer" (fortress) of Mvrddin (tIle Welsh name for Merlin). 'l ite connection of Carmar- then with Merlin all rests on that theory, and legends have grown up in support of the theory. After all it is only a theory. The Romans called this place "Maridunum," cen- turies before the real or imaginary Merlin lived or was invented. The later name of the place evidently arose out of the union of the well-known prefix Caer with the older name. We first get" Kermerden." Then when the Arthurian legend arose, what a brilliant idea dawned. It is Caer-fyrddin—the City of Merlin. And the hill overlooking Carmarthen became Merlin's Hill. Once it was adopted the legend grew and grew. Spenser grows quite charming about the grave of Merlin on the hill. It is beautiful I admit; but it is quite untrue. This, of course, is to many minds a trivial technicality. The very latest development of the legend is that Merlin made this prophesy about the Old Oak. Now, even if the Oak were planted by the first master of the Grammar School I that would only throw it back to the reign of Queen Elizabeth. «*# Xow Merlin, who flourished about the seventh century (or who is is, invented by the Troubadours of the 13th century) could liarly have made a prophesy about a tree which was not planted in his time. If he made it at all, it refers to a very old oak—one much older even than the stump which is propped up in cement. As a matter of fact no reference to any old oak appears in any recognised Merlin literature. The inhabitants of Priory street had a great affection for the old oak, and an English journalist wrote the Merlin prophesy as a bit of gentle satire aibout the year 1880. A good joke is oitenthrown away, and it was accepted as one of the prophesies of Merlin. It is perfectly safe to quote Merlin's proph- esies. You can never get a copy of them any where, so you can't be caught napping. **» It is surely an object lesson in the growth of a myth that a tree which we saw planted in the year 1895 should actually be made to figure as a tree with which Merlin was acqu- ainted fourteen hundred years ago. Even the 1894 sapling is dying—tar macadam is a bad top dressing for trees. Some of us may see another sapling planted there next year and whoever lives for another twenty years will see the legend transferred to that "Old Oak. 9*0 When the Campbells stole the little Cawdor heiress in the 14th century, somebody pointed out that she might die before she grew up. The chief replied "She II never die as long as there's a red headed lassie oil the shores of Lochawe." The Old Oak of Carmarthen will never die as long as a n-urseryman can supply an oak sapling for half-a-crowii. A LETHEIA.

The Question of Health

The Question of Health The question of health is a matter which to tare to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so provalent as it if just now, so it is well to know wbat to taxe to ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly aitar an attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters is acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealing with Influenza in all its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonic strengthening and nerve increasing propeities. It is invaluable for those suffer. ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill. ness, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of teøti. monials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s 9<1 and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemist or Stares, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which BIle are genuine. Sole Proprietors i Quinine Bitton Manufacturing Company, limited, llaneOjL Bouth Wales.

Preachers next Sunday at ICarmarthen Places of Worship

Preachers next Sunday at Carmarthen Places of Worship. UNION ST. INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Rev R. O. Jones, Beaufort, Mon. LAMMAS ST. INDEPENDENT CHAl'Eli, Rev J. Dyfnallt Owen (pastor). BABELL, PENSARN. Rev Daniel Evans, B.A., Cilycwm. BETHANIA (C.M.) Rev Thomas Lamb, Newport. PRIORDY INDEPENDENT C-iAPEU Rev E. Keri Evans, M.A. (pastor). PENUEL BAPTIST CHAPEL. Rev D. Davies, Abergwynfe. TABERNACLE BAPTIST. R.ev E. U. Thomas (pastor). WATER ST. C.M. CHAPEL. Rev J. 0. Jones, Bethania. ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. Rev D. J. Thomas (pastor). ELIM. Mr R. R. Thomas, B.A., B.D.. St. Clears. ENGLISH WESLEYAN CHAPEL. Mr W. R. Owen, West Hartlepool. ZION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Rev Prof. Morris B. Owen, B.A., B.D ENGLISH BAPTIST CHURCH. Rev George Evans. London, EBENEZEIt WELSH WESLEYAh CHANEL Rev J. Meorion Williams, resiuent minister. LIST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES. 1915. selpt. October 10.—Prior y Nov. 21-22.—English Cong e ti ] Church Dt\C. 12.—Zion Prcs-Vtci;iu h rei.